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Canadian Rail 243 1972

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Canadian Rail 243 1972

1Qa2 . 1978
40.11. annJv.raary
IVC:>~ 243
aPR-XL 1..972

THE
CANADIAN RAILWAY
MUSEUMS?
TENTH YEAR
IT C.S.Cheasley.
Jl n the past year, the Canadian Raih/ay
Museum-,t.1usee Ferroviaire Canadien ,
Saint-Constant,Qu6. celebrated its
Tenth Anniversary. Considering that
the Museum is only ten years old,it
has certainly proved to be a very
viable enterprise and significant
progress has been made in every as­
pect of activity during the past
year.
In commemoration of the Museums Tenth Anniversary,certain
SPECIAL EVENTS vlere planne d. In May, the Hays Memorial Archi ves/
Library Building was partially opened to visitors and a special
display was organized on the main floor for the occasion. The
exhibition viaS highlighted by a photograph of the late Charles
H. Hays,accompanied by a description of his many accomplishments
and honours. .
During the month of August,specially-invited guests and mem­
bers came to the Museum by special train to attend a celebration
consequent upon the arrival of the ilorking replica of the steam
locomotive JOHN NOLSON. This celebration also recognized the con­
tribution to Canadas railways of one of the early industrialists
of Montreal. After this initial celebration, the JOHN MOLSON vIas
in operation on the long weekends in September and October. The
response from the public vIas most enthusiastic.
————-
GRACHJG DUll COV::::fl THIS l·l0NTH IS THe:: OTTAliJA DI/ISIOf, S SP:::CIAL TRAIN
standing in CP RAILs station at Manlwaki,Quebec on October 3,1971 •
Unit Number 4075 leads five 2200-series coaches over this branch over
whiCh no scheduled trains now operate. This Qperation attracted wide
attention. Photo courtesy Dick Carnegie.
~ ALTHOUGH THIS PHOTOGRAPH W,S TAKEr~ 8Y TO~1 i10NTGOI~ERY & KEN PAPmEAU
in 1971,it wont be lorig before the exercise will be repeated at the
Canadian Railway ~1useum-Ilusee Ferroviaira Canudien,Saint-Constant ,QU8.
CANADIAN
1013
R A I L
CONSIRUCTION at the Canadian Railway lYluseum continued. As men­
tioned above,one floor of the Hays Memorial Archives/Library Buil­
ding was completed with a temporary exhibit. In addition, the ceil­
ing and vlalls of the upper floor Jere finished and it was antici­
pated that the library would be partially installed before the
Huseum opened in the spring of 1972. .rhe construction of the model
railway in the lo,er floor area of tl10 Hays Building cor.tinued
through the winter montlls, not beir.g actively pmsued in the summer.
Completion of part of the system llas programmed for Hay, 1972.
The platform of Barrington Station vms extended and a r.e! one
Ims built for the Hays Building. Both the Hays Buildir.g and Barring­
ton Station exteriors were painted. The grounds at the Museum Nere
,ell-maintained ar.d some necessary improvements Hore made. A new
four.dation Ilall >las constructed at one er.d of Barrington Station to
prevent movemer.t of the building by the frost.
The RESTOHATION COHMITTEE had ar. incredibly successful year at
the Canadian Railway Huseum,Iiith a total of fourteen exhibits re­
ceiving restoration treatment, ei tiler ir. whole or in part .rhe allard­
ing of an Opportunities for Youth grant enabled the Huse um to hire
junior college and university students to carry out restoration Iork
:Jhich
Vias of great assistance to t11e restoration programme.
Among the exhibits receiving attention ,ere Canadian Pacific
caboose 435288, Canadian National Railllays 2-10-2 No. 4100, Canadian
National Railways D-E rail-car No. 1582
1
f,Canadian National Railways
4-6-1f No. 49,Canadian Pacific Railway 4-6-0 No. 492,Montreal & Soutll­
ern Counties Car 611 and Quebec,North Shore and Labrador Railway
2-6-0 No. 1112. These exhibits were completely restored exteriorally.
In addition,work was in progress on otl16r exhibits,under the direc­
tion of the Restoration Committee.
In addition to the ACQUISITICN represented by the JOHN HOLSON,
the ASSOCiation received the donation of a gas-mechanical shunting
engine fxom HYDRO-QUEBEC. This donation Jill be very useful in the
conduct of light sJitching operations at the Museum. This locomo­
ti ve as in service for its entire life at the Chelsea POll/er Sta­
tion of HsUro-Qu6bec,not far from Hull, Qu6.
Ottalla Transportation Commission car No. 854 was transferred to
the National 1,luseum of Science and Te clmo10gy, Ot tawa, Canada, at the
request of the Ottawa Branch of the ASSOCiation. This car is an ex-
act duplicate of Otta>Ja Transportation CommiSSion car No. 859 at
the Canadian Railway I-1useum and therefore was avaHlg,b1e for dispos­
ition.
Throughout the year, the Museum continued to receive,on behalf
of the Association,many documents, manuscripts, photographs, models
and books from many members and friends,for lhich the Canadian Rai1-
.. THE VISIBLE Rt:SIlLT OF A SUMr~ERS HARD WORV, ElY THE RESTlJRATION COM­
mittee at the Canadian Railway Museum-Mus~e Ferroviaire Canadien.
Canadian Nati8nals 4-6-4 No. 5702 and 2-10-2 Number 4100 pose for
a portrait, together with Canadian Pacific 4-4-4 Number 2928. Mr.
Bob Linney provided the photo.
..
• ,
~
J

i
I
THE ESSENTIAL ELECTRIC RAILWAY ASPECT OF MUSEUM ACTIVITY ~LSO RECEIVED
attention in the summer of 1971. Former Montreal & Southern Counties
Railway Number 611 emerged at summers end in a glossy new coat of
bottle green. John Doyle kindly supplied the picture.
————-
way Museum Commission wiches to extend their thanks. The Commission
would
like to remind the members of the Association that donations
of artHacts,manuscripts,documents and photographs pertaining to
railways are most lelcome.
During the second half of the year, the lease of the property
on which the Museum is located was annuled and the property was
purchased outright from DOMTAR Limited by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association.
Last year was most successful with regard to l4USEUM OPERATION.
The total number of visitors increased nearly 40% over 1970.The de­
rivative increase in revenue permitted the hiring of more staff in
order to provide better service to the visiting public. There was
also an encouraging increase in the number of school tours during
the period May 15 to June 30. Nearly two-thirds of the tours which
could be accommodated during this period were booked before the
Museum opened to the public in the spring. The Montreal Protestant
School Board has added a Visit to the Canadian Raillvay Musewn to
the Canadian History curriculum for Grades 6 & 7.
The Museum was also used as the locale for numerous advertise­
ment-photograph productions and was one of the lion location Sites
for an up-coming feature film.
The increased revenues derivative from all Museunl activities
enabled the COmmission to achieve and surpass the budget forecasts
made early in 1971.
CANADIAN 111 R A I L
Vhile 1971 vias a very good year -perhaps the best to date –
for the Canadian Raihray JIluseum, its continuing expansion and growth
imposes a constant strain on both human and financial resources. In
order to provide for continuing, orderly expansion during the next
several years,it 1ill be necessary to plan and undertake a campaign
for financial support in 19{2. Indeed,this step has already been
put in motion and is well under way at the present time. Nevertheless,
the Museum 1li11 continue to need more volunteers to participate in
the many and varied activities it offers.
The Canadian Rail1ay !-1useum Commission urges every member to
come to our I!useum and join in the fun. Perhaps you iiould like to
bring a friend iiith you. Please feel free to do so,or to suggest to
your friend that he come by himse If, if he wishes. Remember, if you
are over tiielve years old, you can participate in many of the projects
at the Canadian Raihmy Museum.
Why not telephone us at 632-2410 and join in noii?
————-t
A SHOW OF (DIESEL) POWER AT THE CANADIAN RAIU.JAY MUSEUM-~1USEE FERROVIAIRE
C~nadien. CRM Number 9 (right), 8x-CNR No. 15824 and faithful I No. 77 after
undergoing a class 5 repair. Bob Linney provlded the picture.
~ft,,a etJ@~(rJJ 11. .,,~~tJ~
~@~~ ~@@®~~~~~®~~ @
., lMI 11. .. , (iIJ 11 ~ -~ Ift 1.0)} •
t3~~~~~~~~~~ ~~Jlr~~~
!~!!
)7
®~. Rp··
. .. . .
. .. . .
A.S.Halbridge.
Members of the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association should be
pleased to learn that the finan­
cial status of our Association at
the end of 1971 was an excellent
one. The Balance Sheet and Statement
of Surplus, audited by Winspear,Higgins,
Stevenson and Doane,Chartered Account­
ants of Montreal, ,~ere presented to the
Annual Meeting of the Association,held
on January 26th.,1972.
Fifteen hundred Regular and Associate :t-1embers paid total dues
of $ 10,300 for 1971. Allowing for the cost of the December issue
of CANADIAN RAIL, paid for in 1972,revenue and expense per member
was:
per Regular Member
Dues
received
Expenses: CANADIAN RAIL $4.41
Membership Servo .52
Audit .67
General expense ~
Excess of Revenue over Expense-197l
$10.00
Eer Associate member
$6.00
$4.41
.52
.67
.40 6.00
NIL
==-
The Associations reserve at December 31,1971 amounted to $ 1,916.00.
Sales of publications totalled $ 4,275. A surplus of $ 1,450 thereon
provided the Canadian RaihTaY 1,luseum witb $ 1,000 for capital purpo­
ses.
The Trip Committee operated six trips which netted a surplus of
$ 3,550. Canadian Railway Museum capital projects benefitted by
$ 1,900 from this surplus.
In 19(1,the Canadian Raihlay Museum welcomed 22,750 paying guests.
Gate receipts,train rides, vending roachine revenues and the Museum
Store generated a surplus on operations of $ 1,440. The Huseum
began to receive the benefit derivative from an endo~~nt of $25,000
made to cover the cost of maintaining the Hays Z,lemorial Arcbives/
Library Building.
CANADIAN 113
R A I L
In 1971 for the first time, surplus funds from Museum operations were
available for capital projects, to a total of $ 900 •
The
largest capital project payments in 1971 lere:
Operating replica: JOHN MOLSON final instalment v
Hays Memorial Archives/Library final instalment!
Canadian Railway Museum property:acquisition
Employment: Wages and salaries re
Opportunities for Youth,a Government of
Canada-sponsored summer llOrk project for
junior college and university students:
$ 16,100
$ 5,900
$ 23,400
$ 7,700
The most significant omission from the Financial Statements is the
dollar-value of the thousands of man-hours of time spent in voluntary
llOrk on Association projects such as:
CANADIAN RAIL : Editing,publishing and distributing, each month;
IviEMBERSHIP SERVICES: Receiving and answering hundreds of pieces
of mail, each ,.eek;
CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM: Construction of track & si tches;
ASSOCIATION COMMITTEES: Attending,advising and planning;
~iEMBERS MEETINGS: Planning, conducting and improving;
BRANCH LIAISON: Planning,advising,promoting,assisting;
ADMINISTRATION: Performing clerical, legal, engineering, railay
and accounting functions;
OTHER: Patching the roof of the caboose at the Museum!
I-Jithout
the free and willing donation of all of these hours, the Hem­
bers of the Association would not receive all of the benefits llhich
they presently receive.
The Treasurer recognizes and appreciates the considerable assistance
received from members performing related duties.
A copy of our Associations audited financial statements awaits your
1tlelcome communication with th~ Treasurer,at the ASSOCiations address.
Stephen Walbridge
Treasurer of the Association.
IN OTTAWA
IN 9
71
Duncan duFresne.
interesting year,yes. But not unusually
so. Yet progress was made. Our member­
ship held its own and we even picked up
a few new
younger members who will be a
great asset to the group.
Administratively,the relationship between the ottawa Br­
anch and the Bytown Railway Society was clarified, which
was considered to be a major milestone in the history of
the Branch. The result of this has been the easing or
elimination of encumbering legal problems associated with
the operation of equipment, the running of excursions,etc.
and has done a great deal to make life more enjoyable for
members of the Ottawa Branch executive.
In addition to 12 general meetings during the year, eight executive
meetings .Jere held and these ~ere mostly lengthy and lively, as well
as essential and productive. In an encapsulated resume of the events
of the year, the following events may be mentioned:
1. A trip to the Canadian Railway Museum at Saint-Constant, Que.
2. Five days of operation of the National Museum of Science &
Technologys 0-6-0 steam yard locomotive and the handling of
over 6,000 passengers during the period. The first of these
five occasions saw Canadian Nationals famous locomotive No.
6218 on
the Museums spur,along with ex-STELCO 0-6-0 No.40.
The crew of No. 40 -members of the Ottalra Branch -had the
pleasure of switching a car of coal to refuel No. 621~ and
then offered a steam salute to this grand Northern on
this,her final visit, to our Nations Capital.
3. An excursion to Manhraki,Quebec,vdth a five car train. It
was a beautiful occasion -our greatest undertaking yet-and
unquestionabl
J
T
an unqualified success!
4. In June and October,~Te rejoiced in the operation of our ex­
Central Vermont auxiliary stearn crane. iJe enjoyed all the
smells of steam locomotive operation and thrilled to the
sound of a Canadian Pacific steam locomotive whistle -now
securely installed on the steam crane.
5. Restoration continued on most of the equipment belonging to
the Ottalra Branch,including the rebuilding of an ex-CPR
handcar which was operated on the double track parallel to
and in conjunction Hith the operation of ex-STELCO 0-6-0
No. 40 -to everyones delight 1
————-
.1v.USEUrl OF SCIENCE P.flD ECHNOLOGY S EX-3TELCO r·IUtlOt:~ 40 I~ADE 11A~JY YOUf!GSTERS
happy in 1971,as she went through her paces under the able direction of the
Ottawa Divisions President,Duncan du Fresne. Photo courtesy J. Langevin.

LOCOtIOTIVE: R:::STORATION AT THE 1;ITIDr!;:L 1-iLlScU~ OF SCI[r~CE Ar~D TECHM1LO:;Y,
Ottawa,with Ottawa Division members Rolly Lafleur, Dick CarnAqie, Ron
Roncari, Bob Millikin, Bob Elliot, K. Lenton and bunc du Fres~e instal­
ling a new pilot beam on ex-Canadian Pacific D-10 Number 926. One worker
was missing from the picture: Doug Campbell. Hes husy taking the picture!
ON A~ OP~RATING DAY FOR EX-STELCO NUMGE:R 40,DUNC DU FR£SNE PUTS THE LIT­
tle lady through her paces,to the wondering eyes of the younger m[,mbers
of the audience. Photo courtesy J. Langevin.
————-
6. A Hithin-the-Branch group of juice
ll
fans,,,,ho by their in­
dividual efforts managed to get ex-Ottawa Transportation
Commission car No. 854 back to Ottawa, promoted its purchase
from the Canadian Railroad Historical Associatj.on and reali­
zed its sale and removal to tlle National l·luseum of Science
and Technology.
7. The continuing restoration Hork on steam locomotives belong­
ing to the National Museum of Science & Technology resulted
in plaudits from Dr. David Baird,Director of the Museum and
tile erection of a Sign aclmOllledging the contribution of the
Brandl members by tileir voluntary efforts.
On the debit side of the ledger, .Ie were so:cry that our immediate
Past President,f.iajor Bob Elliott,decided to reside tn the United King­
dom after his retirement from the Canadian Armed Forces. Although tile
decision to reside there may be reversed, vIe arc boping that he 1ill
be back. Tile Branch is about to lose another of its members,t1r. Fred
Barbcr,Editor of our publication THE BRANCHLINE,lJho is also a Squad-
ron Leader -lith the Royal Air Force. Fred is being transferred to
Great Britain (home) after many years absence and, ,hile He know that
he and his life are looking forward to the ret urn -li th pleasure, we

regret that he able to the Branch his assistance
in the cOming years.
Our best wishes go dth both Major Elliott and Squadron leader
Barber.
And we anticipate a more successful year of planning, operation
and accomplishment in 19721
————-
l
EX-OTTAWA TRANSPORT.QTION COHHISSION CAR 854 RETURNS TO OTTAWA. IT IS 1030
hours, August 15, 1971, as Number 854 is slowly lowered onto her trucks on
home ground. CRHA Director Ken Heard made the scene. Bruce du Fresne pre­
served the Bvent on film.
OTTAWA DIVISIONS EX-CENTRAL VERMONT RAILWAYS AUXILIArjY NUf:BER 4251 SEEN
here in action. Bob Elliot signals Dunc du Fresne to lower the big hook.
Dick CR~nRojp took the picture.
—-..::::::::-~,,—
Our Association· Today
and Tomorrow.
C.W.Kenneth Heard.
in 1971
Asso­
fourth
formed
SUrelY, the major nefT development
with respect to Branches of our
ciation is the possibility that a
branch, centered in Toronto,may be
in 1972. The name proposed is the
ONTO AND YORK BRANCH.
TOR-
Two former Directors of the Association,Messrs. Wal­
ter Bedbrook and Peter Shergold,resident in Toronto,
have undertaken to respond to the requests from mem­
bers in this area to organize a nel branch. Messrs.
Bedbrook and Shergold presently have in hand the
necessary application,Nhich requires the signatures
of ten members for submission.
It should be emphasized that this new branch, when formed,is not
intended to compete lith present railway enthusiast organizations in
the southern Ontario area, but rather to complement them.
!/ioreover, tlO conditions are essential if a branch is to be via­
ble in this or any region. These are,a sufficient number of enthu­
siastic Association members in the area, vlilling to organize it, and
a role for the branch. There are certainly enough Association mem­
bers in the Toronto-London area to provide th.e manpower to organize.
As for the role of the branch, the Association members in the Toronto
area who are promoting the branch, presently -lish to confine their
activities to the research and study of Canadian railNay history and
similar projects.
They consequently are not requesting authority to acquire and
preserve large items, such as raihTay rolling stock, and do not en­
visage undertaking activities similar to those of the Upper Canada
Railway SOCiety.
Conversely, as an alternative to the formation of the Toronto
and York Branch,the Associations Board of Directors might well
investigate the possibility of concluding a formal affiliation agre­
ement .Ii th the Upper Canada Rail~vay SOCiety of Toronto, under a pro­
vision which -from the pOint of vie. of our Association -vould be
permissible and enabled under the new General By-law,presently in
preparation. Such an arrangement could offer advantages to the
members of both organizations.
As most of the members present at tIle 1971 Annual General Me­
eting are no doubt a>vare,I have been ~ngaged for the past two years
in a comprehensive study of the structure of our Association, with
a view to preparing a ne General By-law,to supercede the present
By-law Number 3. This broad assignment has taken much longer thar
originally anticipated, but it is nevertheless my hope that it wil:
CANADIAN
120
R A I L
be concluded sufficiently ir. advancE. of May 19,2 so that the mem­
bers may consider its terms before the er:d of that mor.th. It has
beer: sl1t;gested that a Special Ger:eral Meetir.g of ;;he Associatior.
at Thich the proposed By-la;q HouJ.d be discussed -might be held ir:
conjur.ctior:: wi to. ott.er activities of interest to the members, such
as a Members Day at the Canadian Railway Museum or an Association
excursion, to take place on a suitable 1Jeekend.
The
general terms of the By-law which I shall propose Iere out­
lined in my Annual Report for 1970 and 1Iere presented in summarized
form in the March 1971 issue of CANADIAN HAIL.
In vie1-1 of the future importancE. to the Associatior. of the str­
ucture embodied in the ned proposals,I can make available to inter­
ested members a fevi copies of my 1970 Annual Repor.t.
As le 1001<;. tovmrds the future, one of the most significant de­
cisions taken by your Board of Directors in 1971 Vias to submit an
application to the Government of Canada for a series of grants for
a total amount of $ Y(O, 000. This sum was reques ted for capital ex­
penditures at the Canadian Railway Museum.
It is,of course, impossible at the present time to determine
whether or not this request fjil1 be granted. It is my private opin­
ion,however,that it will be the better part of a year before any de­
cisior. Hill be forthcoming from the appropriate agency of the federal
government.
The application for this sum of money coincidentally raises a
number
of questions, which must surely be resolved as part of the pro­
cess of reaching a decision on the application. For example,it would
seem important to clarify the concept of the Museum as a whole.Those
members ~/ho are intimately inVOlved in the construction and opera­
tion of the Canadian Raihmy Museum may have -in their own minds –
a
clear idea of what this over-all concept is, but it is not apparent
to the casual viSitor. Unfortunately, comprehensive visual aids to
exhibit identification -vlhich ,;ould assist in j.nforming the visitor
of the complete concept of the Museum -are,in general, lacking.
In addition, there is not at the present time a logical acquis­
ition policy. Such a policy is important,llith regard to the future
space and structural requirements. Obviously, the present ten-acre
site is not large enough. to house and exhibit the present collect­
ion,except under warehouse conditions. vlliile the policy of afford­
ing r~imum covered storage for restored exhibits is essential, the
display in conditions which can only be described as confined, is
regrettable, In these circulllstances,should not a deciSion be taken
as to l pt to achieve? Or whether, concurrent with changir.g museum concepts
and riSing standards of display, the Museum should earnestly try to
generate in the visitor a clearer idea of what raihlays were and are
and how they l1ere, are and .!ill be relevant to Canada. In sum, what
is required is an understanding more effective than can be presently
evoked by a series of static displays of raill,ay /1IOtive povler and
rolling stock.
Finally,the crucial question raised by the request for public
CANADIAN 121
R A I L
monies is whether or not the present method of managing the Museum
will continue to be viable if the expansion implied by this grant
application takes place. In the last fourteen years, mountains have
been moved by volunteers. Indeed,the J:I.1useum would not now exist wi­
thout these efforts and they will always be required.
But while the vOlunteer-type of effort is essential, the volun­
teertype of thinking is no longer adequate. Further expansion will
necessitate a more mature, more informed, more expert direction of
the Museum. The Association is today the proprietor of a property
having a value conservatively estimated to be lorth $ 600,000. If
present plans materialize, this same project will have a value five
years hence in excess of $ 1 million. There are very few persons
who car: appreciate this figure. Most of us would claim to be ri~h if
we had one -twentieth of this amount. The management of this estate
is no sinecure. Its direction is,frankly,quite beyond tlle capabil­
ities of any group of amateurs and we must surely face immediately
the problems associated with the appointment and remununeration of
a permanent staff -even a modest one of two or three people -head­
ed by a professional museologist,if indeed one can be found who is
willing to supervise our particular spe~ialty.
In grappling with such questior:s,it is essential to avoid the
insularity of outlook which has manifested itself on occasion over
the past three or four years and which has ever: resulted in the ne­
edless alienation of people vlho wuld have been useful to the As­
sociation. It has also been said on many occasions that our Asso­
ciation is national in scope. This has yet to be proven. VJhile we
may presently have an excellent archives and a communications medium

CANADIAN RAIL -permitting the dissemination of much valuable in­
formation relating to the history and development of Canada I s rail­
ways, our Association by no means has a monopoly of knowledge and
expertise on the subject. At times,it seems impossible for us to
recognize this fact.
The Canadian Railway Museum -and indeed the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association -is one of several similar organizations in
Canada which may have a legitimate Claim on any funds ;Ihich the Gov-
ernment of Canada may make available to publicly-sponsored as
opposed to government-sponsored -museums. Our application therefore
will be judged according to the same criteria as all of the others
and it should be recognized at once that ,fe have some very presti­
gious companions. One example is the Royal Ontario Museum of Tor­
onto.
One area of Association activity, considered by the Board of
Directors as deserving of more attention is that of publicity and
pub
lic relations. On several occasions in 1971,the Board discussed
this subject. The excellent progress made during the year by the
Public Relations Board of the Canadian Rail:lay [/luseum was noted and
the hope was expressed that this Board could also become the Public
Relations Committee of the Association, I-lith responsibility for pub­
lici zing both the Association and the l-luseum -although not neces­
sarily both at the same time.
l~hile the membership may have increased in 1971, it is sti 11
CANADIAN 122 R A I L
somewhat lower than the all-time high,established some years ago.
More important -it is safe to say that our membership does not ex­
ceed 25% of the total membership potential. In other lOrds, there
are at least four times as many people interested in the railways of
Canada = past and present -than can be counted as members of our
ASSOCiation. This potential must be exploited -and as soon as
possible. A well devised, imaginative publicity drive and membership
campaign -coupled with improvements in our product,Association mem­
bership -should be devised and implemented. Inherent in this propo­
sal is the assurance that the Associations Branches would also de­
rive benefit and the possibility of forming branches elsewhere wou­
ld be enhanced.
Further,it should be emphasized that among the Associations
initiatives in 1972 should be an earnest effort to strengthen and
increase our membership in the francophone sector of Canadas pop­
ulation where,at the moment,it is notably weak. The Board,ever con­
scious of this situation,Vlhould arrange to meet with francophone
members,to insure their more meaningful participation in the affairs
of the Association. vfuerever possible the transactions of the Assoc­
iation should be communicated in both of Canadas official langua­
ges. Hhere a demand can be ShoND,the Associations publications
should also be bilingual.
To summarize, the problems facing the Association in the 60s
seemed at the time to be insuperable and yet, they were resolved or
mitigated. However, the problems of the 70s will be no less formi­
dable and very likely entirely different. If they are to be resolved
rapidly and expeditiously -and to the best advant.age of the Assoc­
iation -nOlI is the time to undertake the study of their probable
nature and to thereby prepare the plans essential to their efficient
resolution.
TRIP COMMITTEE
REPORT Jl97Jl
F.F.Ar!gus
A
t the first meeting of the Board of
Directors in 1971,the formation of
the Excursions and Special Activities
Commi ttee was approved. The members of this
conmlittee ,ere t.1essrs. Angus,Doyle,Leach and
Jvlurphy. Mr. R. Rivet was subsequently added
to the Committee.
TIle first activity was the February 6 SnO Excursion,an ac­
tivity organized by the committee in the preceeding year. This trip
by CP RAIL ran from Montreal to L2.belle, Quebec,and return, the train
consist.ing of CP HAIL diesel-electric unit Number 4071, four mod err:
coaches and the dome-observation car Revelstolte Park. This was in­
deed a sno, trip as the photographers discovered at the various
photo stops, but those ~ho braved the deep snow obtained pictures of
the rare sight of a scenic dome train in the picturesque Laurentians.
An innovation on this occasion >las the provision of a bar and re-
freshment service in the dome car, vlhich added to the enjoyment of
the excursion.
1<1i th the cOming of Spring, another excursion viaS planned. Thi s
time it Ilas by Canadian National and Central Vermont Railways, from
Hontreal to St. Albans,Vermont,to take part in the annual Maple Su­
gar Festival being run by the Vermont Maple Festival Council. As
April 3 approached, ticket sales soared and more and more coaches
~Iere added to the planned consist of the train. During the last
week before the event, the committee members were kept busy all even-
ing until late at night answering hundreds of telephone inquiries
about the excursion. By April 3,the train had grown from a project­
ed five to eleven coaches,pulled by t,JO CN diesel-electric A units
and an unprecedented 650 passengers were aboard! The train was com-
pletely sold out and regretfully, at least 350 people vJere dissa-
pointed at not being able to secure tickets. The success of this
excursion Vias due in no small measure to the great cooperation of
the Vermont Tourist Bureau, v,hich helped to publicize the excursion.
Saturday,June 5,was the date of our Apple Blossom excursion
to Granby and Haterloo, via Canadian National RaihTaYs. The trip
follol/ed the line of the old Montreal and Southern Counties electric
line to Granby and then on to Waterloo. At Granby,passengers had
————-
.. UIST OF ABBOTSFORD, QUEBEC, or~ THE FORMER LHJE CCLC:CTRIC) OF THE MOiJTRE/~L i-iND
Southern Counties Railway, the Spring-Time or Apple Blossom Special paused
for a picture -but, alas, the apple blossoms had faded! S.S.Worthen.

CANADIAN 125 R A I L
the shoice of either going on a specially organized tour of the
Granby Zoo or else continuing on to Haterloo. Motive power on the
trip was CN road-Svlitcher 3900 and ALCO A unit 6750, both units of
considerable interest to the diesel enthusiast. Weather was perfect
for the trip, although unfortunately the apple blossoms were absent!
1971 1aS the tenth anniversary of the Canadian Railway Museum
and a special banquet and barbecue as held at the Museum on Aug­
ust 14. As part of this celebration, a special train of two CP RAIL
Dayliners (9114 and ne,,,ly renovated 9116) went from Hindsor Sta­
tior. to the Huseum and eventually,at the close of celebrations,re­
turned. Ihis party vTaS noted for the official unveiling of the fu11-
sized replica of the locomotive 11 John Molson 11, which lIas under steam
on that day. It should also be recorded that the occasion was also
the last ASSOCiation excursion from the old 11 Hind sor Station, since
the neVI tracks Situated farther Test are no! in use and the last
rails vrere removed from the old trainshed late ir. November.
The 1971 tour to other museums VIas billed as a double feature:
a trip to the trolley museums at Branford and Warehouse POint, Con­
necticut. As it turned out,it TaS a triple feature,since a trip was
also made to the steam-p01!ered Connecticut Valley Railroad near Old
Saybrool{, Conn. Both trolley museums featured the operation of Can­
adian streetcars and those who attended were able to I1ride d01m
memory lane on lvlontreal dOUble-enders, one of the I1golden chariots 11,
Montreal & Southerr. Counties No.9, two Toronto cars and a variety
of othel equipment, including the world I s first PCC car.
This year,the annual Fall Foliage Excursion was held again af­
ter a lapse since 1969. Followir.g tIle success of the Maple Sugar
Trip,it was decided to go via Canadian National-Central Vermont once
again and our destination ;as vihite River Junction, Vermont. A sell­
out crowd of 370 passengers enjoyed a great trip through the scenic
Green Hountains in perfect feather. Once again we had the vlhole­
hearted support and cooperation of the Vermont Tourist Bureau and
the Central Vermont Raihlay. This trip completed the excursion pro­
gramme for 1971.
~
Excursion EXEenses. Revenue
February 6 11 Sr.m,, Excursion
$ 2,349.73 $ 2,924.41
April 3 Maple Sugar Trip 4,132.40 6,134.69
June
5 Apple Blossom Tour 1, 213 .3~ 1,213.93
August l~, Museum Members I Day 629.50 629.50
September 18 Trolley Museum Tour 390.31 360.00
October 2 Fall Foliage Excursion 3,963.24 5,481.10
The success of the 1971 excursions is reflected in the financial
statement,part of hich is shown above. As revenues exceeded expenses
by more than $ 3,500.00 -an unprecedented total -it vIas possible
to transfer $ 1,900 to the !I1useum capital fund, where much of it ill
be used in the progranune of restoration of exhibits.
————-
~ EAST OF GRAIJ!3V, qUEBEC, CAN.~DIAN NATIONAL UNIT r~UMBER 3900 PAUSED BRIEFLY
for a photograph and then hauled the train onward to Waterloo. 5.S.Worthen.
ELECTIONS AND
APPOINTMENTS
FOR 1972
F.F.Angus
T HE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE
Canadian Railroad Historical As­
sociation was held at McGill U­
niversity,Montreal,Que., on Wed­
nesday,January 26,1972.
Approximately 40 regular members,as well as a fe.·/ associate
members and friends were present. The reports of the various Di­
rectors and Committees ~ere read and questions were asked regard­
ing the functions of the Association during 1971. Summaries of
many of these reports are included in this issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
The
scale of fees for the several classes of Association mem-
bership were ratified by the members and the scale for 1972 was
unchanged from that of 1971.
Nominations for Directors for thirteen candidates for the 12
positions of Directors of the Association for 1972 I/ere received .Ac­
cordingly,an election was held and the following candidates were e­
lected to the Board of Directors:
Angus,F.F.
Beatty, J .A.
Cheasley, C • S.
Doyle, J.
Latour, D.
Leach, J;,.O.
Mosher,K.D.
Murphy,M.P.
Nicholls,R.V.V.
.Jalbridge,A.S.
Webb,R.W.
Worthen,S.S.
After the election, the firm of Winspear,Higgins,Stevenson and
Doane was
appointed as auditor of the Associations accounts and,
follovTing this, the meeting was terminated.
The r.e,l Board of Directors of the Association met on January 31
and February 7 and the following officers were elected:
President
Vice -Pre sidents
Treasurer
Secretary
C.Stephen Cheasley
D. Latour S.S.v!orthen
A. Stephen Walbridge
Frederick F. Angus
CANADIAN 127 R A I L
Honorary Officers of our Association were elected at
meetings:
Donald F. Angus
these
Honorary President
Honorary Vice-Presidents 11 .R .Crump, Chainnan, Canadian Pacific, Lilni ted j
It.C .Day ,
Chairman, Toronto Trar.sit Commission
L. LAllier,Chairman,Iviontreal Urban Commun-
ity rransportation Cornmissionj
N.J .Maclv!illan, Chairman and President, Cana­
dian National Railwaysj
David
SteVlart,President,Antiquarian and
Numismatic Society.
The
following areas of responsibility were assigned to the Dir­
ectors of the Association:
Membership
Publications Sales
Editor,CANADIAN HAIL
Chairman, CANADIAN HAIL Conuni ttee
Meetings &: Special Activities
Excursions &: Trips
Corresponding Secretary
J.A.Beatty
L.O.Leach
S.S.Horthen
M.P.Murphy
D. Latour
F.F.Angus
J .A .Beatty
All of the Directors with the above portfolios were authorized
to form committees to assist in the carrying out of viork in connec­
tion with these portfoliOS.
Hembers vdshing to participate in any of these activities are
urged to contact the Director concerned.
————-
EDMONTON
ENERGETICS!
Text &: Photos
Don Scafe.
~HE DRIVER-TRAINEES OF 154 COMPANY, ROYAL
Canadian Army Service Corps, heaved
sighs of relief late in the afternoon
of November 13,1971, when the y were told
that they would not be returning to the
Alberta Pioneer Raih/ay Association mus­
eum
site again during the year,
Lending personnel and trucks beginning in September,
154 Company helped to complete the APRA1s n~jor pro-
CANADIAN 128 R A I L
ject for the year. Corronencing on a rainy Saturc.ay in
June,tie-hauling became a muscle-tiring weekend
activity that continued until the ties for two miles
of track had been transported to the future home of
A.P.R.A .Park.
Before outside activities began for the year, refurbishment
of former CN 4-6-0 steam locomotive No. 1392 and former
Intercolonial Railway baggage car 8029 was started. The
successful hydrostatic test on No. 1392 brought the oper­
ation of a second steam locomotive in Edmonton much closer
to reality. The 91-year accumulation of paint on Car 8029
yielded sometimes easily, other times reluctantly,as mem­
bers prepared her for a return to Intercolonial colors.
Although members of the Rocky Mountain Branch are keenly interested
in the operation of steam locomotives, they are mindful that first­
generation diesel povrer is beginning to succumb to the scrapper I s
torch. The A.P.R.A. is pleased that Canadian National Railways hon­
ored its request for donation of CN unit No. 9000 -the first com­
mercial road freight A unit built for a Canadian railway.The unit
is in operating condition.
The roster of the A.P.R.A. has expanded with the arrival
of the follO~ing equipment:
ex-Crm 9000 F-3A built by GM-EMD in 1948
ex-CNR 50122
Pile-driver built by Dominion Hoist & Shovel
model 408-Bl
ex-CGTX 1102 Tank car Built December,1926.
Statistic Edmonton
Ties moved to Museum site
Passengers carried -3 occasions
ca. 5,500
4,550
The
site for the A.P.R.A.Museum has been se­
lected, but no equipment has been moved from
Edmonton, since tile connecting switch with the
C.N.R. has not been completed.
Johnny Cash was given an honorary membership
in the A.P.R.A.
Copies of the print of ex-NAR No. 73 that he
is holding can be purchased unmounted from
the A.P.R.A. at :p 2.00 each •
• THE C1ErJTLE: I1EtlOVAL OF THE THRllTTLE PRECEDES Afl IPJTErlN,lL HlSPECTION OF EX­
Canadian National Railways Number 1392s boiler.
AFTER THE SUCCESSFUL INSPECT InN AND HYDROSTATIC TEST OF NUMBER 1392,FIBRE­
glass lagginQ is applied over the boiler.
A WAVE TO THE: CN RDC RAILINER TO ST. PAUL?AL8ERTA MAKES A OREATHER FOR THE
APllP, mBmbers Ilauling ties to tile museum site in summer 71.
r~::ri8ERS P,ili:: Pl!STiOO AT TflACI~-SIDE TO aiSURE THAT EX-f!ORTHERN ALBERTA RAIL:~AYS
Number 73 doesnt climb the rail unnuticed,when backing into thB barns at the
end of a weekend of operRtion by the APRA and the Rocky Mountain Division.
THE MODERN RECREATI, N OF A ONCE-FAMILIAR OPERATING PROCEDURE. PASSING ORDERS
on the fly is one] of the demonstrations presented to visitors at the APR!..
,

THE
COMPET
IT
IONS
(CN)
TRAIN N
UHBER
4
ROLLS
by
APRAs
Number 73
and
combine
at
Edmonton,
Alberta
on
the
Labour
Day
(1971)
weekend.
TRACK-LAYI
NG BEGINS IN
TO
THE
APRA
MUSEUM
SITE
from
the
ne
l
~ly-installed
switch
on
the
C~
J

s
main
line.
W~LL-IiNO
W
N
COUNTRY
£ND
1!JESTERN
SINGER,
JOHNNY
Cash,
receives
an
honorary
membership
in
the
APRg
-and a
print
of
Number 73 –
prior
to
his
summer
71
concert
in
Edmonton,Alberta.
Photo
courtesy
J.
Rysdyk.
THE
ACQUISITION
OF
THE YEAR!
EX-CANADIA
N
NA-
tional
F3A
Number 9000
is
moved
slowly
forward
by
CN
Number 5172
prior
to
the
official
pre­
sentation
to
the
APRA
on November
27,1971.

CANADIAN 135 R A I L
WlllI11S
Editorial Staff CANADIAN RAIL
APRIL,
1972 •
• orIE OF I~l!.ll INDUSTRIES UPCO!J:mG !-10DC:L5 IS GUESS ltJHAT? WE RE:PRmUCC: HEREUITH
an artists sketch of an M42!J-TR. Mr. Philip fvlason,who did the sketch, was
of the opinion that the real thing would be outshoppad before the sketch
appeared in CANADIAN RAIL.
————-
PA-1S IN THE SNOKING DEPARTMENT:
Jim Shaughnessys observation on the-then D&H PA-ls in the
December,1971 issue of CANADIAN RAIL has elicited the
following comments from Mr. B.A.Bigelow of Montreal:
The excessive volumes of smoke emitted by the ALCO
PA-ls is not a low-speed phenomenor:,but is related
to the transient prime-mover loadir:g when the unit
is being r:otched up. Take, for example, the situa­
tion {nvolved in going from throttle r:otch 2 to
notch 3. The demand for more power resulting from
this move causes the electrical system to command
ir:creased prime-mover rpm, with a resulting increase
ir: horsepower output.
The fuel control system reacts by increasing the
volume of diesel oil injected into each cylir:der •
However,
the volume of air required to burr: tllis
increased amount of fuel completely is increased at
a much slower rate.
The volume of air required for proper and complete
combustion of the fuel is partially sucked into
each cylinder,as it is ir: any 4-cycle internal-com­
bustion engine. It is also charged or pushedinto
the cylinder by a fan.
The fan is driven by a turbine, >Ihich is ir:stalled in
the exhaust gas flow and driven by the force of the
exhaust gasses,expelled from the cylinders. The
speed of the turbine -and therefore of the chargir:g
fan -depends on the speed of the exhaust gasses and
thus increases in proportion to exhaust gas speed.
This process is,of necessity,a slow one.
The whole arrangement of turbine and fan is called a
IITurbocharger •
The
time required for the necessary increase in turbo­
charger speed -necessary to achieve complete combus­
tion of all the fuel, with simultaneous elimination of
smoke -may be several minutes.
Ideally,a demand for increased power, resulting in in­
creased prime-mover rpm, should result in an increase
in fuel volume with a simultaneous, adequate increase

CANADIAN 137 R A I L
in air volume, thus achieving complete, smoke-free com­
bustion. If this were possible, there would be no smoke
or incompletely-burned fuel particles from the exhaust
stacks.
ALCO engines which smoke suffer from two major illnesses:
(a) some of the exhaust gasses may bypass the turbo-
charger,due to leaks in the exhaust manifold. As
a remedy, many railroads use non-standard exhaust
manifolds on their units;
(b) the smoke-control device may be faulty. It is re­
regrettable that ALCO failed to develop a device
which could be maintained in proper operating con­
dition by the average diesel-engine maintenance
shop.
lhe ALCO prime-mover has a rapid response in service, but
is costly to maintain, as the carbon from the incompletely
burned fuel -otherwise smoke -contaminates the lubrica­
ting oil. A good engineman will throttle up, notch by no­
tch,allowing the prime-mover to stabilize in each notch,
thereby minimizing the amount of unburned fuel (smoke) •
The smoke
production is obviously at its worst when the
throttle is notched up rapidly, preventing stabilization
of the prime-mover at each throttle position.
While comparisons are generally odious,it must in all
fairness be pOinted out that General Motors Diesel prime­
movers,due to their 2-cycle design, require that the air be
charged into the cylinders. In this type of design, the
charging fan is driven from the crankshaft so that there
is -practically speaking -no time-lag between engine
speed demand, fuel volume and available air volume. This
type of crankshaft-driven fan is called a supercharger •
The
latest GMDL prime-movers use a turbocharger which
is gear-driven in the lower throttle notches and unclutch­
ed (not gear-driven) in the higher throttle notches, being,
in the latter conditions, driven directly by the exhaust­
manifold gasses. At higher prime-mover speeds, the speed of
the exhaust-manifold gasses is sufficient to power the
turbocharger directly through an exhaust-gas turbine.
A gear-driven turbocharger at low prime-mover speeds,
plus a direct-driven turbocharger at higher prime-mover
speeds, makes smoky-exhaust GMDL diesel-electric units
extremely rare.
THE FIRST OF CARTIER RAILWAYS THREE NEW M-636s
came
out of MLW Industries on January 27, 1972,
and was loaded on board ship at Montreal on Feb­
ruary 2 for the trip down the St. Lawrence Ri-
• THIS PICTURE OF JII1 SHAUGHNESSYS MIGHT BE TITLED IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS OF
Steam on thE] Delaware & Hudson 1 • r,orthbound Train 35 was growling up the
line at Saratoga Springs,N.Y., on July 23,1969 – a veritable pillar of cl­
ojd by day!
CANADIAN
138
R A I L
ver to Port Cartier, Quebec. It was thought that
shipment would have to be delayed until spring,
but this was not so. The first unit -road num­
ber 71,was followed later by Numbers 72 & 73.
Ken Goslett.
IDLY THUMBING THROUGH THE YELLOW PAGES OF THE CURRENT TELEPHONE
directory for Montreals Lachine-Dorval-Pointe Claire Lakeshore
area, John Welsh recently discovered with some surprise that under
the heading RAILROADS,there was just one listing and that was
for -of all things -the Boston & Maine Railroad, (with offices) on
Cate de Liesse Road in Montreal!
At the beginning of February,1972,Algoma Central Railways
second-generation power had arrived at Sault Ste.Marie,Ont.
Pierre Patenaude reported that the three sD40s had serial
numbers A-2561 to A-2563 and carried road numbers 180,181
and 182. They were equipped with dynamic braking.
Mr. Patenaude also reported that Quebec,North Shore & Labrador
Railway ordered forty (40) SD40-2s from General Motors
Diesel of London, Ontario. Twenty are scheduled for spring
1972 delivery, wi th the remaining 20 to be delivered in the
spring of 73. Serial numbers are A-2613 through A-2632 .
Road
numbers will be 221 through 240.
AFTER LORNE PERRYS ARTICLE ST. LAMBERT SUMMER
appeared in the December,1971 issue of CANADIAN
RAIL,a flood of letters of congratulation ensued.
Among them was one from Mr. Laurence Gagnon of
Amherstview,Ontario which said in part:
I have seen few presentations that match Mr.
Perrys effort in terms of writing style, in­
formation, atmosphere and some … ,hacking good
photos. Many writers tend to overdo the sen­
timent in looking back to the steam age, but
Mr. Perry supplied a documentary which is
outstanding. There are no formal books on
railroading that can match the observer who
is thoroughly familiar with a particular
area. I hope Mr. Perry will contribute an­
other article before too long because I am
sure a good many other readers have been
impressed by st. Lambert Summer.
Mr. Earl Roberts of St. Johns,Newfoundland,points out in
his letter of congratulation, that the caption on page 347
of the December 1971 issue, for the photograph of Canadian
National Railways engine No. 6173 is incorrect. Mr. Rob­
erts is -quite right and the Editor accepts the responsi­
bility for the error, since he typed the caption.
Mr. Roberts reminds us that the CN Northern at the CNE
Grounds in Toronto is class U-2-g No. 6213,sister engine
{
CANADIAN R A I L
to No. 6218 of recent !a~. No. 6173 unfortunately was
scrapped at Turcot,Montreal in October, 1961 ar.d was writ­
ten off CNls books that same month. Thank you,Hr. Roberts,
for setting the record straight.
MR. GEORGE A. MATHESON TELLS US THAT CP RAIL DAYLIHER NO. 9l02,PIC­
tured 1n the December.l971 issue of CANADIAN RAIL, used to be as­
signed to the Saint. JOhn,N.B.-McAdam-Woodstock-Arrostook-Edmunston
train service before it was withdrawn in November,l963. DAYLINER No. • 9199,now
on the E&fi on Vancouver Island, was one of the last DAY­
LINERS on Trains 201_206 of CP RAIL, from Montreal to Sherbrooke and
Megantic. No. 9199 ran up until mid-July.1970 and the last run of
Train 206 was made by CP RAIL DAXLINER No. 9111 on July 31,1910.
YOU MIGln HAVE THOOOHT THAT THE GlIosr OF MON­
treal_New York City passenger train service
had been finally and thoroughly laid to rest
by New York state Governor Rockefellers res­
olution -ratified by the voters -not to pro­v
ide any more State funds for intrastate pas­
senger train operation. Not so.
New Yorker Joseph V. MacDonald, buyer of cap­ital
equipment for Continental Can Company and
ex-V
ermonter from st. Albans -he left the
state in 1932 -is agitating for a resumption of
the former CN-cY-New Haven-Pennsylvania
Washingtonian and Montrealer
n
passenger ser_
vice. With AMTRAK already operating trains from
Washington to Springfield.Mass.,Mr. MacDonald
saya it would be a snap to turn a buck on the
proposed serv1ce, since the New England route
is financially sounder because of the far gr­
eater market through densely-populated south­
ern
Hew ~ngland,compared to the barren Hudson R
iver route.
Subsequently.Mr. MacDonalds proposal was es­poused by
several Governors of the New England
States~who auggested that they might be wil­
ling to consider subsidies for passenger train
operation -presumably through their individ­
ual states. It seems to be unlikely,however,
that passenger service north of Springfield,
Mass. would be viable~since the centres of
population in Vermont are few and Interstate Highway
Number 91–89 parallels the railway
for the entire distance to the Canadian
border. S.S .Worthen.
—–_ ….. _—-
ONCE IJPON A TIMC::, rulB.E:R 0-1 (0 rOR DIESEL,1 F~ r.tJESS UlAn) rF THE
IJ!!tional Harbour!! BIlard-CaMsell dell Porta r.ationeUl( on the Hontrelll
Wllterront wes I! centre-cab job. The Editor dOesnlt know anything
I!Ibout it, except the dllte was July 12,1948. CRHA Arcnive8,
~.k.Toohey Collection.
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S
CAN.A.ntAN R.AIL
P.n,U.h.d Ql/ … he
WAIlt1N RAlUOiIIlI!:iOI!.!C.Al ~so::::u.nmf ::.::.~.:~-…
~OQ … . U.rnber.htp tnoluclln.
~C&nadla.n Rall e 00 annually
z:crIOR. B.B VVorth .. n PRODUCTION
ARCHIVES
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OPEN UA Y -BBlPI.
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