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Canadian Rail 242 1972

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Canadian Rail 242 1972

leae -1978
l..V<>~ 242

~
. )I N rl! NfN !{ AL
• ~ I -. Ii. I -. I I I I. •• it
• • •• • • •• • • • I • •• •
. . .. . . ….-… .
.,
~
The Completion of the European and North
American Railway in October ,1871.
C.H.Anderson.
Editors Preface
ajor C. vlarren Anderson, Corresponding Member of
the New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, N.B., and
Member of the Association,has traced the his­
tory and construction of the first railway from
Ha1ifax,Nova Scotia to Saint John,New Brunswick
via Truro and Moncton,~n previous issues of our
magazine (No. 206,January,1969;No. 215, November,
1969) •
This Provincial Gauge
ll
(5 Teet 6 inches) railway was in­
tended by its builders to link the Port of Halifax with
the City of Montrea1,but not by the route later adopted
by the Intercolonial Railway Company of Canada. Instead,
it was proposed to extend the line from Saint John south
across the International Boundary to Bangor and Portland
in the neighbouring State of Maine,from whence traffic
would be carried northward to Montreal over the rails of
the Atlantic & St. Lai-/rence-St. lawrence & Atlantic Rail­
way -completed in 1853 and immediately leased by the Gr­
and Trunk Railway Company of Canada.
Thus,in 1867 -the year of Canadas Confederation -the sole remain­
ing portion of the rm1ifax-Montrea1 railway yet to be constructed ,
laS that part betv/een Saint John, N.B. and the International Boundary
to the west of City Camp -1ater,lo1cAdam,N.B. Major Andersons present
article describes the construction and completion of this portion of
the international railway.
The completion of the European and North American Rail­
way was the realization of the dream of John Alfred Poor,
native son of Portland, Maine and early proponent of the
St. Lawrence & Atlantic-Atlantic & St. Lawrence system,
who,with foresight far beyond his time, predicted that
the future transportation history of his native port-city
lay with Canada, rather than with the territories of the
eastern United States.
r :c :2C ::
OUR COVER IS A GENTLE REMINDER -AS IF ANY OF US NEEDED IT -THAT THE
JOHN MOLSON of 1971 will operate at the Cana~ian Railway Museum-Mus§e
Ferroviaire Canadien on May 20,1972 weekend. Designer Gordon Small is
at the regulator. Peter Layland took the picture.
…. Y8sterday s Brundages Point -today s IJest field Beach; n8ar the place
where the ERNAs first locomotive CARLETON, Number 2,was placed on the
rails in 1868. Photo courtesy New Brunswick Museum.
CANADIAN
72
R A I L
The success of the European and North American
Railway was the vindication of his belief. It
is of the completion of this undertaking that
Major Anderson writes.
~ith the opening of the European and North
American Railway between Saint Jobn, New
Brunswick and Bangor,Maine -the centen­
nial of which was observed on October IB
and
19,1971 -the great dream of one man
was realized.
To appreciate fully the significance of this
event,it is necessary to go back in history
to the great railway convention of July,
IB50. Convened at Portland in the State of
Maine by the Honorable John Alfred Poor, it
was attended by many distinguished persons
from the eastern United states,as well as
from New Brunswick,Nova Scotia and the Can­
adaS and it affirmed that a railway should be
built between Portland and the east coast of
Nova Scotia,as a means of shortening the dis­
tance of travel by sea between American and
Europe.
We may scarcely add that by its completion, it places
Saint John, N.B. (and 1ill very soon, Halifax) in d1r­
ect railway communication with Montreal by the Port­
land Branch of the Grand Trunk. The road has there­
fore especial value to Canada as giving a more direct
route of travel between its eastern and western pro­
vinces.
At the end of the conference, two companies were incorporated,
one under the laws of the state of Maine and the other according to
those of the Province of New BrunsWick,each Company to retain the
name European and North American Railway Company. The Saint John
to Shediac,N.B. line, recently projected, was now merged with the
larger scheme.
On September 29,lB52,a contract was entered into between the
Province of New Brunswick and the European and North American Rail­
way Company and the English construction company of Peto,Betts,Jack­
son and Brassey,for the bw.lding of a railway from the boundary of
the ~cate of Maine to that of the Province of Nova Scotia.
The Government of Nova Scot:l.a undertook to make the surveys
from Halifax to the New Brunswick boundary. The first sod of the
line from Saint John to Shediac was turned at Saint John on Sep­
tember 14,lB53 amL~ much celebration. Construction was begun im­
mediately by Messrs. Peot,Betts,Jackson and Brassey,but in IB56,the
European ·and North American Raih/ay Company in New Brunswick was
CANADIAN 73 R A I L
CARD OF INVIT.l~TION,
NOT T RAN S FER A 8 L E.
~l/ f/tc; CCrlt~ll7 /l/vtirrilo (/llfr! tie ?11fI 1.0 EUlopeG.n and North American Railway, NI I/o Ijd fINd /fJd C/,1JI1
7 t!Zlu;:~P 1I0l.
e:l CJf!/xirleNic,), th I cfil/ :!lAOttlct cp:tald f.mel otl;: J
r!ijtti:jl/.l;/oC! jlcJI-t!cm&/t 1I,tll h tt;, ,fI/ob ,/,t!c yg:t;t 0/ J!llal:/oi. I.w,!
cIttlti:,? Ik r/51 t;tie ?ttlt Ie cze1Cldt!.) ,1tltttl!:Ic jot tke OCCCWtOlt.
f!;l Q7j;d:Jri~y, tf;; If I/ //71 (5lWI:JfC1l-r;i.7;;,,1/ lP,1I taN,
~/l:f!UP fop dJflt? r?/!,/ at C~fli cc;:c;{, 0t eft.
An nnSWe7 is /espectfnlly sob:cited.
President.
Bnngol, jl1aine, Oct. 2, 1871.
The Eastern; the Boston ancl jJlc~ine, nnd the jJ:[nine Central Rail Roads,
,,,ill pass the holder of this Carel, ooth ways, on presentntion.
CANADIAN
74 R A I L
bankrupt, falling victim to the financial recession consequent upon
the Crimean llar.
The following year, the Government of New Bruns~
wick salvaged as much as it could of the under­
taking and went ahead with the completion of the
railway between Rothesay and Moncton,N.B. The
last linIe in this section -Sussex to Moncton –
1aS finished and opened on August 1,1860, com­
pleting the first portion of the whole project
as planned -that of a railway between Shediac
and Saint John.
Meanwhile,the Province of Nova Scotia had completed their
portion of the undertaking between Halifax and Truro(1854-
1858),incorporated as the Nova Scotia Railway. But there
still remained sections to be completed: Truro to the New
Brunsvdck boundary and onward to Moncton; Saint John to
the International Boundary near Vanceboro,Maine.
The Legislature of the Province of New Brunswick in 1864 incorpor­
ated a new company for the avowed purpose of building the exten­
sion from Saint John westward. This was the resurrected European
and North American and this portion -reflecting the intent of the
incorporators – Ne1 Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the State of Maine all voted subsi­
dies for the construction of the other portions of the trunk line
remaining unbuilt. Enthusiasm ran high.
Mr. E.R.Burpee of Saint John made a survey of the line of the
road~ in 1864 and subsequently received the contract for the ninety
miles of railway from Saint John to Vanceboro,Maine,passing through
Hartts ~tllls and City Camp. The first sod on the Western ExtenSion
was turned in Jones Field,South Bay,by Mr. J.H.Gray,~~yor of Saint
John,on November 9,1865. As usual,a luncheon was afterwards served
at Rothesay House,with Major H.B.Robinson acting as the chairman of
the celebrations.
In the fashion of the times, nothing much happened thereafter
for a few years. It was not until August,1867 -the year of Can-
adas Confederation -that serious construction was started.
Confederation of the four provinces of Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick,Quebec and Ontario -as the two Canadas were
thereafter named -changed the railway aspect of things
somewhat. The portions of the E&NA built by Nova Scotia
and New Brunswick -as well as other public railways in
these two provinces -~lere taken over by the new Federal
Government to become the nucleus of the future Intercol­
onial Railway Company of Canada. The many missing sec­
tions between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were con­
structed either by the Federal Government or by provin­
cial authorities, acting with the means supplied by the
new Dominion government. But the European and North Amer­
ican Railway, organized to build the Western F.xtension ~
CANADIAN
75 R A I L
was still functioning independently. In fact,by statute,
the City of Saint John had become a shareholder in this
railway company.
The
first locomotive to be placed on the rails between Fair­
ville and City Camp (later,McAdam),was the CARLETON, Number 2. She
was
brought from Portland,Maine in the schooner R.M.Brookins for
the Western Extension Railway Company. The locomotive was fitted up
at what was then known as Brundages Point, today called Westfield
Beach. Her date of arrival was August 10,1868 and after she was
assembled, she was used on ballast and track-laying trains.
The R.M.Brookins
ll
, a schooner of 169 tons, was commanded
by a Captain Douglas and her cargo was consigned to Scam­
mell Brothers,a famous old shipping company of Saint John.
The piece of land over which the CARLETON was moved, between the
Saint John River and the railway line was,at one time, mowed regular­
ly during the summer months and presented the appearance of a well­
kept lawn. It was dotted with short evergreen trees, carefully sha­
ped in various ways. The field was kept in this condition as a mem­
orial to the landing of the locomotive, but today, through negligence,
it has returned to its wild state. However,even today, the site is
quite unmistakable.
By August l4,1869,the railway had been completed from Saint
John to Hartts Mills,today known as Fredericton Junction, and
there was no doubt in the minds of the Directors that traffic would
be moving between these pOints by Movember 1st. The track had been
laid, the buildings erected and nearly finished and the turntables
installed. The bridges remained to be completed and the track to
be ballasted. By this time, there were five locomotives and gravel
trains at work on the line. After completing the ballasting and
right-of-way construction, it appeared that,in about two weeks time,
one engine and train would not be required on this end of the Wes­
tern Extension. The time was fast approaching when some thought sh­
ould be given to the operation of the road.
At this stage of construction, the following
rolling stock was recorded a.J being on the
road :
Engine CARLETON The Portland Company New 1868
Engine EAGLE ROCK The Portland Company 2nd.-hand 1869
Engine ST. CROIX The Portland Company 2nd.-hand (7)
Engine YOHO The New Brunswick Co. 2nd. -hand 1870
Engine WM. PARKS The Portland Company ex NBCo. New 1869
Passenger Cars 4 first-classj 2 second-class
Baggage Cars 2
Boxcars
Platform Cars
l5,all built prior to 1870 at Saint
John,by a Mr. Harris,under an
agreement between him and the New
Brunsdck CompanYj
50, purchased by the New Brunswick Co.
25,purchased by E.R.Burpee by the NBCo.

CANADIAN
77
R A I L
1.·or Extension rrolll Saint .TolIn VTes~vard.
NCOPORATEO BY ACT OF ASSEMBLY.,
Yfrtl,r/ /2,l1tl{1, tll7f7. ——:gr;.tjt4atiJd?td ~vt.&I al litl cae
~~iG is 10 ~Crlif1! thatcJt{ ~ ~.. ….. . . …
Of~;~. S~ ~~~ …… islJopl,ietor
of r;vy. $-_. Sharc.s, Nwnbel dk-l2! Z-78 tJ u…~ .. _.
of the CAlIJ.!lL STOCK of /.he Ewopkn g JYOlth .!lmerieun Raitw(ty Company,
fol Extension from Saint John TYestward, snbject to assessllwnt from time to time
iontil Fifty Do/leas per 8hwe shall hnve been jir.lly paid np thenon; slwject also
to
the Regu.lations altd Bye Lctws of the said Compa,ny, the Laws of the P,ouilwe
of New B7loJl.swicle, (Uul those in force within the same; aJUI that the said Shale-l
~ tNtli,sfc/1able. by aosigmnent endmsed hereon, Iecold thcrcof being made by
the Secretary in the 1,ansfel Boole of the Company nnd on the sUlrcndeling this
Cellijlcate,
IN TESTDIfONY WHEREOF, the President and SeclctalY haue
heleunto Signed theil
names wul nfji.1:cd the Seg(ot;,tlJ!L..aid
Compu,n~ !jamt John, JYew Bllonswwlc, thi~ ~,?c.. …
dny of ~~ .II D, I!j7()
.4–1 . .d
~/..·>-Y:–.~
,~ 9.l3~–;- 1,;.,,/. I
• .~ry
~~~~,~¥It:~~~~~:~r~~~~
…. THE SCENe: AT THE INTERNATIONAL BOUrJDARY Hl 1869 -MATTAl!!AMKEIG,MAINE.HERE
pictured is Engine No. 3,M.H.Angell of the European & North Amerllcan
RailtJJay,a broad-{jauge 4-4-0,ex-Grand Trunk Railway Nulhegan.Built by
the Portland Company in 1853.Cylinders 14×22,drivers 60 o.d. The
l:I.H.Angell lilas never standard-gauged. Photo courtesy George L. Brown.
c : x::
On Wednesday,November l7,1869,an excursion was held -on invitation
only from Mr. E.R.Burpee -for the opening of the Western Extension
of the European and North American Railway,between the r~vers Saint
John and St. Croix and -in additon -the Fredericton Branch Rail­
way (CANADIAN RAIL No. 2l5,Q.v.): Fairville to St. Croix,N.B., and
return.
The Western Extension was formally opened for
traffic on Wednesday, December 1st.
Most complete and comprehensive arrangements were made for the ap­
propriate celebration of this important event. The programme con-
CANADIAN
78 R A I L
sisted of the trip from Fairville to the St. Croix River and return
during the day and a grand dinner in the car-shed at Saint John in
the evening.
At sharp nine on Wednesday morning, about 300 invited guests
assembled at Fairville station and, although the previous
day and night had been extremely wet and the rain contin­
ued to come down in torrents until eight oclock -and at
that hour,prospects for a clear sky were not very good
all the guests were determined to enjoy themselves to the
full. Owing to the very heavy rain, considerable delay was
occasioned in starting and extreme precautions were taken
in examining the track along the right-of-way.
At 9.40 a.m.,the excursion train left Fairville,preceded at some
distance by an engine and tender, running as the pilot. The two tr­
ains ran at a moderate speed for 10 or 12 miles, ,.,hen they were de-
1ayed a short time while a weak spot in a very steep embankment
badly -lashed by the rain -was tested. After the train crews and
the contractor had assured themselves that the railway was safe,
the trains again started -separated by the same interval -and
reached Brundages Point (Westfield Beach), 18 miles from Fairville,
at 10.20 oclock. From here to the junction with the Fredericton
Branch Railway at Hartts Mills -today, Fredericton Junction -sev­
eral stops were made to allow the passengers to descend and view
the scenery -albeit somewhat rainwashed. At the Junction,the Fred­
ericton train carrying about 100 excursionists awaited the arrival
of the train from Fairville. AmOng the most distinguished guests was
His Excellency Governor Wilmot, who l!laS greeted with hearty cheers
by the Saint John delegation.
From Hartts Mills to City Camp, the road was remarkably
straight and level and the distance was performed at a
good
rate of speed, The origin of the curious name City
Camp is not known, but this place was renamed McAdam
Junction about 1869, in honour of the Honorable John
McAdam, representative for Charlotte County in the fed­
eral government of Sir John A, Macdonald.
Owing to the delay in leaving Fairville,the reduced speed between
that place and Brundages Point and the stop for the inspection of
the weak spot in the track, the time of arrival at City Camp -80
miles distant -was considerably later than intended in the original
programme. It was therefore decided not to run the remaining six
miles to the end of construction, but to return at once to Saint John
so as to be on time for the dinner in the car-house, At City Camp,
c -:t= -;:,e =
~ E&NA ENGINE NO. 4 OLD TOhJN, BUILT BY HINKLEY LOCOMOTIVE CO~1PANY IN
1869,brings the first train into Oldtown,Maine in 1869.
Photo courtesy Charles D. Hezeltine.

CANADIAN
80 R A I L
the number of participants was further increased by the guests from
St. Andrews,st. Stephen and from the neighbouring State of Maine.
The return trip to the Junction was made at a fast rate
of speed,but thence to Fairville,at times the train ran
at a snails pace. As dusk fell, the speed was further
reduced and twice the train was stopped and the line in­
spected to avoid any possible accident. Those passengers
who had not made the eastward journey, nor inspected the
line previously on November 17, lCl69, iere surprised at
some of the great engineering difficulties overcome dur­
ing the construction of the railway. At South Branch,the
train halted to provide an opportunity for the passengers
to disembark and examine the truss bridge over that stream.
In parentheses, it can be said that the stati0n houses on
the line, which had been completed,were designed similar
to those on the other E&NARy. The first-class passenger
cars were built by James Harris of Saint John. They had
monitor roofs and were handsomely furnished and well ven­
tilated. Great credit was due to Mr. H.D.McLeod,Superin­
tendent,and other officials -as well as all employees on
the train -for caution and attention given to the safety
and comfort of the passenger-guests.
A bountiful dinner awaited the guests on their arrival at the car­
shed at Saint John. It was set out in this building on City Road,
the structure and interior being tastefully decorated with ever­
greens and bunting. About 500 guests were present, who did full jus­
tice to the bill-of-fare,which was prepared in the most sumptuous
style. The usual toasts to Her Majesty and the Royal Family were
followed by a toast to His Excellency the Governor General,who re­
sponded to it in his eloquent style
ll
• Many other toasts follOled.
Governor Wilmot proposed the health of the host,Mr. E.R.Burpee,Con­
suIting Engineer and. referred to the enterprise, indomitable perse­
verance and engineering skill shom by him in the building of the
railway and referred proudly to the fact that he was a New Bruns­
wick boyll. This toast was received with much enthusiasm and was re­
sponded to by Mr. Burpee in a suitably dignified and demurring man­
ner. Subsequently,the merry company dispersed,entirely satisfied
with the days enjoyments.
In the neighbouring State of Maine where, under separate
legislation, the prolongation of the European and North
American Railway was being constructed from Bangor to the
International Boundary,the line was completed to Milford
e ::Ie:: :::Ie :::
~ THE ARTIST S CmJCEPT10N OF THE GREAT Di1Y AT THE BORDER -COTOBER 19,
1871. General U.S.Grant,President of the United States,drove the last
spike and E.J.Russell of the Canadian Illustrated News published his
sketch in the November 4,1871. Sketch courtesy New Brunswick Musew
m•

EAILY LOCOiVlOTIVC (0·4·0) OF THE OLD EUROPEAN AND NORTJ I· A~·ICRJCfN HAII.W .. Y.
.. E&.NA ENGINE NO.6 LA TOUR BUILT BY BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE UORI~S IN 1871.
T Originally built as an 0-4-0 tank engine;then converted to an 0-4-0
tender engine. The La Tour became No. Fi of the St. John &. Maine
Railway in 1878,No. 29 of the New Brunswick Railway in 1882 and No.
506 of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1888. She was scrapped in Octo­
ber,1895. Photo courtesy C.W.Anderson Collection.
c: :Ie :c: ::::a
in l86~ and to Mattawamkeag the following year.Ironically,
the building of the E&NARy. destroyed the usefulness of
the oldest railroad in the State of Maine, the Bangor and
Piscataquis Canal and Railroad Company, 12 miles long
later the Bangor,Oldtown and Milford Railroad -which had
been built and placed in operation about 1836.
The European and North American Railway nevertheless acted fairly
by this latter Company,by buying in September of 1868 its property
and by acquiring as much of its rolling stock,rails,etc. as could
conveniently be used, and the abandoned right-ot-way. Thereafter,
trains between Bangor and Oldtown operated along the bank of the
Penobscot River over the E&NA tracks -the same right-of-way that
is used today by trains of the Maine Central Railroad.
Chief Engineer Burpee made a tour of inspection over the
whole line of the railway prior to November,1870,and re­
ported to the Company officers that everything was work-
ing satisfactorily. The grade from Mattawamkeag to King-
man -on the way to Vanceboro and the International Boun­
dary -tas expected to be ready for the rails by Novem-
ber lst.,~dth the exception of two deep and difficult
cuts, which would be ready by April,187l. Beyond Kingsmans –
today shown as Kingman on the MEC map -every cutting had
been completed and the grade ~1aS ready for the rails, as
fast as they could be supplied. On the line east of the
Keag from Calais Road,gangs were ,.Iorking on every mile
and the work of grading las progressing very quickly.The
same could be said for the construction from Calais Road
to the St. CroiX River at Vanceboro,whlch was expected
to be graded by December lst.,1870. Nearly eight miles of
CANADIAN
83 R A I L
this section were graded and ditched at the time of Mr.
Burpees visit -ready for the rails. Between 500 and 600
men were constantly employed on the construction of the
raihray and the work was being pushed to completion as
fast as possible.
To assist
the State
in this construction, the European and North American
of Maine had upon its roster,in 1870,six locomotives:
No. 1 ORONO Hinkley New 1868 No. 2
WINN Hinkley New 1869 No. 3
M.H.ANGELL eX-NULHEGAN, 1869
Grand
TrlU1k
Railway:
Portland Co. 1853 No.
4 OLDTOWN Hinkley New 1869 No.
5
DIRIGO (note) 2nd.-hand 1870 No. 6
BANGOR Portland Co. New 1870
DIRIGO was purchased second-hand from the East­
ern Maine Railroad. She was built by Hinkley in
1869.
in
Seven more locomotives were added to the roster in 1871, including
four new ones: 2 Bald1lins and 2 Portlands -and three second-hand
from the Bangor,Oldto1ln and ~lilford Railway,when this line was pur­
chased.
Hork continued at an accelerated pace throughout the summer and
fall of 1871 and everything pOinted towards the meeting of the rails
early in October. This happy event was finally celebrated at Bangor on
October 18 and at Vanceboro -on the Maine side of the St. Croix
River,the International Boundary -on the 19th.
This was,in many respects, one of the most notable events ever wit­
nessed in the state of Maine,with an international flavour attached
to it, not only because the European and North American Railway con­
nected two countries in a sense foreign to one another, but also be­
cause both the President of the United States and the Governor Gen­
eral of Canada -the recently-formed Dominion -honored the occas­
ion with their presence. No President of the United States had ever
~ before travelled to the northeastern portions of the country of
which he had been elected Head of state . The Union Jack of Great
Britain and the Stars and stripes of the U.S.A. were flown to­
gether everywhere, How the town and country folk flocked in, full of
enthusiasm for the great pageant they had come to see. As the time
for the gala parade drew near,the streets of Bangor were gay with
school-children, firemen, mill-workers and the military, each group
seeking their place of assembly.
The parade was quite prompt, every part of it
being in place at the appointed time.
The whole military force of the state was pre­
sent -ten companies in all. The Portland Me­
chanics Blues acted as a bodyguard to the
PreSident,by whose side sat Lord Lisgar.
u
·
· ·
STATIONS.
BANGOll,
VEAZIE,
13 ASIN :mLLS,
OHONO,
WEllST.iWS,
GREATWORK~,
OLDTOWN,
CANADIAN
,~,:t~~
~f-~ ,If: …. ~!;
84
R A I L
Fo} the Government and Information of EmpZoyees only.
TJ.-llSS paisa ~V(,l)tT){. l·Tu.r~·s (}Ol~G 50r:lT1.
So. 2. 1,.,. .. :I. U. 1. S • No. 2. .. y() . … ~·fJ • IS.
l(l:i … ellUc., .FrI.:i!}, ZO:1sfmucr. Pa.Ut:IIUt.J· Pass!:I1!!!:. 1It;iUltt. rll~SCUU:1.
A,IY.L A,M, A,:r.~, P,M, A:IY.L lJ .. l!~:. A.m.
Lea. 7,45 10.()0 11.80 5.00 Arr, 7.00 8.50 J.1.10
7.57 10.22 lU.l 5.17 6.43 8.30 10.55
11.54
5.25
Arr.lO,40 Lea.8,15
S.08 Lel1O.50 11.57 5.28 6.32 Afr.S.05 10.45
12. iI. 5.33
iU2
Arr. B.2:l 1 !.lO 12.10 5.45 Lea. 6.15 7.40 10.30
1to. 7.
J(I$t!clI:Jcr.
P.li-I.
2.40
2.25
2.18
2.15
2.12
2.03
~.()O
THE IIE.I· HGCltES ;udie:ltc d];1t the liniu:; P,s:; ut tlw.t point. ST;I101~ marked with il :;br [] l!e
Flag Stalions, fit which trains will stop (,nly whcll there a;e paS~C!lg0r;; tc get 0!1 or a if.
TK .. IlNS No. 1 ~l> 2, ioili no! do;; 1t .i/ta!) S{aNoll8.
A HF.ll fLAG hy day, or reel light by lIight (l~notcs d:
gcr. auLl all Lmills must at once stop.
Ar,L lR.U1~ ill COlllC to [. 101.1. ::TOP hefore passing the bridge orer Kenduskeag ;Stream.
No PASSF.:iGEIIS will be carriell 011 Freight Traills.
·WH.r::,En;R 11:.11 No.3 does not tllTiYe nt. OltOO on time, the train which pnsses it at tlw.t point, wi]l
wait nt 01:10 ]!j minute, :lftcr hieh lhe Passenger Train ,,,ill have the. right to the tr~ck. :ltd the de·
tained Freight Train ml~i; kecl out of its way. This rule also applies to toil! No.4.
WUENIEK ANY TI:.[: is ullavoidably occupying t.he track 011 Ihe time of another train: such d(~tnitl­
t;.l train lilust hiLve ;.; Fl.a~-IIlilll: Ht lC,i.6L ::OGO ff::6( ill ;il.lvai.,Ca;; to Y,,;.t
tilt: /PlfHl.t:hilJg t.rain.
Tr..ITS WILL l:(;1! by B .. IGo:: time, und the clock in tl;e Sup~illter.(icns Office will be the st:t;o~!anl.
EOlPL()rEES MUAT JlE !mLL~Cl IYI~lI THFSE RULES.
B,I..:;GOR, Se;,Jtr.mber 24th, 1·5GB
z:::: :c: ::x
~ AN Er~PLoYEES TIMETABLE OF 1868 OF THE EUROPEAN & rJORTH AIIERICAN RAIL­
way of the State of Maine,U.S.~.,governing the part of the road between
Bangor and Oldtown. Collection of C.~J.Anders·on.
CANADIAN
85
R A I L
A multitude of other distinguished guests occupied a ~hole convoy
of carriages. Companies of Firemen from Bangor and the surrounding
communities were present and a large number of red-shirted lumber­
men from the nearby savnnil1s attracted much attention, being an en­
tirely unique feature of the pageant. They presented a splendid lo­
oking body of men and marches like veterans.
The President was hailed with loud cheers at
every corner along the route and was greeted
by the enthusiastic school-Children, all gai­
ly uniformed. It las an altogether pleasing
sight.
A light luncheon at the Norombega Hall might appropriate­
ly have been described as a banquet. The large hall was
nicely draped and the tables were we11-wupplied with com­
estibles and service was efflcient.
Mayor Dale of Bangor presided. President Grants little speech was
something almost droll, delivered in apparent bashfulness by the
hero of many battles. Lord Lisgars response made a most favourable
impression. Governor Perham of Maine made some admirable impromptu
remarks ihi1e Governor Hi1mot of New Bruns-lick expressed him.se1f in
an energetic and litty speech that called for many outbursts of ap­
plause •
After the luncheon, the President of the United
States received the people in the square near
the Universalist Church and a regatta took place
on the Penobscot River and a r~1itary review in
another part of the city. In the evening, rain
prevented a display of fireworks, which had been
a,lai ted with keen anticipation.
On Thursday morning, the 19th., in bright, cool October ~lea­
ther, the excursion train departed from Bangor Ii th fif­
teen cars, including four Pullman Palace Cars. Crowds
appeared at every station along the line and, at each
stopping place, President Grant good-naturedly appeared on
the platform of the rear car to acknowledge the cheers of
the assembled citizens.
The Town of Vanceboro -on the easternmost border of the Unite~
States, beyond which President Grant did not feel free to go -was
in 1871 a little settlement named for a Mr. Vance, who was owner of
the township at the time the town was organized.
A mammoth tent had been pitched a few yards from the rail­
way line, under which tables Iere set to accommodate 1,300
guests without crolding. Each guest had before him a menu
describing the luxuries of the feast. The caterer was Mr.
G.D.Robinson,formerly of Bangor,Maine.
When it came time for the speeches,it las impossible to hear the
voices of the speakers from the farther portions of the tent.In an
attempt to both hear and see the guests of honor, people began stand-
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CANADIAN
87
R A I L
ing on the chairs and, all order being lost thereafter, some bolder
persons climbed upon the tables and the remains of the repast. In
their eagerness to see President Grant and Lord Lisgar and to hear
the speeches, many erstwhile ladies dragged their skirts in the rem­
nants of the ice creams, salads and coffee. The pandemonium and lit­
ter was incredible,as the dishes and food were trodden upon and
crushed underfoot by the rowdy throng. A Vanceboro lOman created a
sensation by deliberately climbing onto the head-table itself and (
tugging her child through the food, dishes and decorations to a spot
directly in front of the President.
President Jewett of the European and North Amer­
ican Railway was chairman of the celebration.
President Grant,Governors Wilmot and Perham, with
many others, made appropriate speeches before the
days celebrations 1ere brought to a disorganized
conclusion.
Many of the guests were unable to accept a cordial, supplementary in­
vitation to visit the City of Saint John,New Brunswick, but those
that did were tendered a dinner at the Victoria Hotel by the Direc­
tors of the Railway Company in that City. The Governor General,Lord
Lisgar,and some 200 guests, were present.
To John Alfred Poor -the Msn of Maine and
genius who had conceived the iaea of a great
raihtay from Halifax to Portland, Maine and Mon-
treal -and to E.R .Burpee, lithe Boy from New
Brunswick,who had translated this idea into
reall ty, too much praise and D.c-claim cannot be
given
ll
• The building of this international rail­
way was a great enterprise, attended by Juany dif­
ficulties both physical and financial, but fi­
nally -as attested to by the events at the
International Boundary on October 19th.,187l –
the great undertaking was brought to a success­
ful conclusion.
PO STSCRIPIUM
In l875,by act Cap.No. 71 of the Statutes of the
of Canada, the European and North American Railway
in Canada was consolidated With the European and
American
Railway Company in the State of V~ine,
August 3l,1878,the bondholders of the Canadian
::a;: 2
Dominion Company
North
but on company
… ON THE OCCASION OF THE GREAT CELEBR,qrrON AT THE INTERNATIONAL BOUNDrlRY
on October 19,1871 -with Cansdas Governor General and the President
of the United States attending -this was the menu presented by Mr. George
D. Robinson of Bangor,Maine,the caterer. ColI. C,W.Anderson.
Maine Central Completes Purchase of
E. and N. A. Railway
j IN 1882, THE STATE OF ~·lAIfC: FORTION OF THE EIJROPEl~j & rJORTH AMEflICAN
~Railway was leased to the Maine Central Railroad Company for 999
years. The Maine Central finally purchased this portion of the E&NA
on November 17,1955 for the sum of $ 3,114,500.Photo Maine Central RR.
=-::::x C ::::::z:: ::x
foreclosed on the rail~ay property and by act Cap.No. 92
of the Ne,>l Brunswick Statutes for 1878, these bondholders
were empO~ered to form a new company called the Saint John and
~~ine Railway Company, for the purposes of operation
and further construction.
The New Brunswick Railway Company leased the line of the Saint John
and Maine
Railway in 1883 for a period of 997 years and finally, in
1890, the Ne~ Brunswick Raihlay Company leased all its holdings to
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company for a period of 999 years. In
the previous year, the Canadian Pacific had begun to use the line of
the New Brunswick Rail>lay from the International Boundary at Vance­
boro,Maine through McAdam Junction to Saint John,as part of their
Short Line from Montreal.
After the foreclosure by the bondholders, the
reorganized European and North American Rail­
road Company in the State of Maine from Bangor
to Vanceboro was leased to the Maine Central
Railroad Company (formed in 1862) for a per-
CA NAD I AN 89 R A I L
iod of 999 years from 1882. The Canadian Pa­
cific Railway Company secured running rights
on the portion of the line from Mattawamkeag
to Vanceboro,Maine,in 1889.
In the elimination of the last of its leased lines, the
Maine Central Railroad concluded the purchase of the last
remnant of the European and North American Railroad on
November
17,1955,after several months of negotiation.
The final page in the history of this international railway waS pen­
ned when President E. Spencer Miller of the Maine Central presented
a cheque for $ 3,114,500 to President George F. Eaton of the Euro­
pean and North American Railroad. In return, President Eaton handed
President Miller the deed to the property, which included 114 miles
of main line track, from Bangor through Mattawamkeag to Vanceboro, as
well as Bangor Union station and 10 locomotives which had been in
storage at Rigby Shops,Portland,Maine,since their replacement by
diesel-electric units. The hundred-year history of the European and
North American Railway was complete.
SOURCES:
Newspapers:
The RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCER Saint John,N .B. December 3,1869
November 18,1870
The TRANSCRIPT Bangor, Maine October 28,1871
Reports & Journals:
Seventh Annual Report: European & North American Ry. 1864
Report to the Railroad Comm1ssioners,State of Maine 1876 The
MAINE CENTRAL RAILROAD MAGAZINE December, 1955
Other:
A Statutory History of steam & Electric
Dorman
The 14a.ine Central Railroad 1847-1947 Wheeler
Railways in Canada 1836-1937.
1937
1947
L IN OCTOBER,1971,THIS IS THE ~y THE J01~T r1ifHJE. CENTRAL-CP RAIL BRIDGE
, over the St. Croix River at Vanceboro,Maine :ooked. The middle of the
river is the International Boundary. The photographer waited and wait­
ed for a train to come along,but not one didl Photo S.S,Uorthen.
Same
~ CPRail 3000
F.A.Kemp
~J he third set of Canadian Pacific­
CP RAIL engines to carry numbers
in the 3000-series has been out­
shopped recently by General Mo­
tors Diesel Limited of London,
Ontario.
Classed as GP-38 by the builder and DRS-20a by the railway
company,the first 8 units will be supplemented by an additional 24.
It is expected that they will replace some of the existing C.L.C.
(Fairbanks-Morse) units and begin the phasing out of MLW units hav­
ing 244-type diesel engines. The new units are generally similar in
appearance to the GP-35 (5000-series) units, but differ from them in
the placement of the exhaust stacks,horns and snow-shields.
The first Canadian Pacific Railway locomotives to be num­
bered in the 3000-series were of the 2-6-0 wheel arrangement orm6-
gul type, built between 1886 and 1890 and renumbered into this ser­
ies in the C.P.R.s 1912 renumbering. The last of these locomotives,
No. 3011, was scrapped in 195h.
The numbers 3000 to 3004 were vacated by 1926 and in 1936
they were assigned to the Jubilee 4-h-h-type,higb speed passenger
locomotives, built in that year.
These semi-streamlined locorootives with 80-inch driving
wheels,lightweigbt running gear and 300-psig boiler pressure were
seldom used to their full speed potential and their low starting t~
active effort and slippery characteristics necessitated substitu­
tion by other locomotives when train tonnages increased. They re­
mained in service until 1958,the last one -Number 3004 -being re­
tired in that year.
Their diesel-engined successors may be neither as attract-
ive (to some) or as speedy, but they certainly w:l.11 have a h:l.gher
starting tractive effort and tonnage ratingl
= ::::se 😡 = ::::z
…. CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILhlAV Er~GINE NO. 3009,class J-2-a,huilt in 1888
was photographed in 1910 at Calgary,Alta •. Photo L.D,Leach coll.

I.,
A PRAIRIE
TYPE
2-5-0
ENGINE
NO.3029
OF
CANADIAN
Pacific
Railway.
Photo
courtesy
Canadian
Pacific.
ANOTHER
VARIETY
OF
THE
PRAIRIE
TYPE

NO.
3053
of
Canadian
Pacific
photographed
at
Smiths
Falls,
Ontario
on March
18,1947.Photo
coll.
L.O.
Leach.
CqNADIAN
PACIFIC
JUBILEE
TYPE
4-4-4
ENGINE
NO.
3000,class
F-2-a
on
Train
37
at
Ayr,Ontario,at
7.15
p.m.
Photo
by
L_E_Hampel.
HAULING
ONE
OF
THE
MOST
VARIED
CONSISTS
IMAGINE­
able,an
unknown
Jubilee
type
roars
across
the
Canadian
countryside
on
its
way
from somewhere
to
somewhere.
CRHA
E.A.Toohey
Collection.

CANADIAN 95 R A I L
MAKING THE SCENE AT ST-CLET,QUE8EC,ON CP RAILS hJINCH.::STER SU8DIVISION arB
GP 38s Nos. 3000-3001 by GMDL. Philip Mason froze them on film be­
fore they went west in November,1971 for service between Edmonton and
Calgary. The photo was taken in May,1970.
PROBABLY THE [lOST 8EAUTIFUL OF THE ENTIRE FAMILY OF CANADIAN PACIFIC-CP
RAIL 3000s were the Jubilee 4-4-4s of which No. 3004 at Qu~bec City,
~u~. on February 29,1948,was an excellent example. CRHA,EA Toohey Coll.
Wl111L1S
Editorial Staff CANADIAN RAIL
March,
1972.
THE LAST OF PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAYS SEVEN
M-630
1
s left MLW Industries, Montreal on January
13,1972,en route for Vancouver. This order was to
be followed closely at MLW by three M-636
1
s for
Quebecs Cartier Railway,unfortunately derated from
the outset-in the same manner and for the same rea­
son(s) as the recent order of M-636
1
s for Canadian
National Railways. (K. Goslett)
EX-CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS I SWITCHER NO. 7470, THE PROPERTY OF
Mr. Dwight A.Smith,Editor of liTHE 470 of Portland, Maine,U.S.A., –
after a variety of experiences, including a starring role in a Holly­
wood movie -has been transferred from Maine Central Railroads Rig­
by Roundhouse in South Portland to the former Boston and Maine Rail­
roads roundhouse at North Conway,New Hampshire. Here,it will await
the organization of liThe Conway Scenic Railroad and/or the demo­
lition of the B&M trackage to North Conway and Intervale from Mt.
Whittier,New Hampshire ( ca. 12 miles),in the shadow of the Ossipee
Mountains. (THE 470)
AFTER OPERATING FOR ABOUT SD{ MONTHS WITHOl1l AN AP­
proved Railway Transport Committee boiler certifi­
cate,ex-STELCO 0-6-0 Number 40 from the Museum of
Science and Technology,Ottawa,has been brought dead
to Canadian National Railways I Point St. Charles
Shops, Montreal, where boiler retubing is to be at­
tempted. As of mid-January, work had not been start­
ed. It is rumored that Canadian National is using
this project to determine whether larger steam loco­
motives can be retubed at the Point. (K. De Jean)
MORE ON THE FABULOUS PA-lS:
At press time, General Electric of Erie, Pennsylvania, had received a
total of l86-plus requests for the two ex-Santa Fe,ex-Delaware and
Hudson PA-lIs,recently turned in by D&H on an order for U-Boats –
U-36-c
l
s • After considerable head-scratching,GE-Erie came up with
a truly SOlomon-like decision, proposing sale of one unit to the
highest bidder and DONATION of the other one to a deserving railway
museum. Sale price for the one unit would probably be governed by
the allowance generally given on a trade-in unit in operating con­
dition, ~lhich is in the v:!.cinity of $ 10,000. GM-EMD is known to have
an agreement with its scrap-dealers, which stipulates that units to
be scrapped MUST be scrapped and not resold to diesel unit leasing
companies for rebuilding and/or repair to running order, thus de­
priving GM-EMD of the sale of a new unit. No doubt GE-Erie has a
similar agreement with its scrap-dealer.
Oh,yes? You wished perhaps to know the identity of the fortunate
railway museum to which the one PA-l will be donated? GE has not yet
decided Ithich museum will get it, but it will probably not be the
same organization that buys the other. Thus GreenbriarRailroads
current classic lash-up will continue to be unique.
CANADIAN 97 R A I L
AFTER A CHRISTMAS-HOLIDAY TRIP FROM OTTAWA TO THE MARI­
times,Phillip Fine reported that Canadian National Rail­
ways have installed flashing orange lights on the roofs
of many of its main-line passenger service diesel-elec­
tric units. The sleeping car conductor on CNs SCOTIAN
said that the purpose of these lights was to warn pedes­
trians and motorists of the approach of fast t~ains, as
well as to provide advance warning to the crews of other
trains on adjacent lines. These warning lights operate
continuously night and day and, according to Phillip,
II really add an exciting atmosphere to the overall ap­
pearance of the train. All they require now is the ad­
dition of a siren
ll

ONE RESULT OF THE FORMATION OF THE GRAND TRUNK CORPORATION BY CAN­
adian National Railways is now unmistakably obvious. The new GP38
1
s
being delivered to the Corporation by GM-EMD of La Grange,Illinois,
are in a startling new paint scheme. The overall design of GTW is
retained -with the ends of the units in bright red -but the pre­
dominating colour on the units is IlBandeen I s Blue I, reportedly sim­
ilar to the Boston & Maine Railroad IS blue, before it becomes flFaded
ll

(K. Goslett)
MEMBER DEREK BOOTH OF BISHOPS UNIVERSITYS DEPARTMENT
of Geography,Lennoxville,Qu~.,is checking up on the few
stations remaining on certain lines in the district be-
tween Montreal and Sherbrooke,Que. In particular, he is
anxious to know which stations still stand on:
Penn Centrals Adirondack Jct.-Athelstan line;
Canadian Nationals Longueuil-Nicolet sub.;
Canadian Nationalls st. Hyacinthe-Sorel sub.;
Canadian Nationalls Coteau-Noyan route;
CP RAlLIs Stanbridge-Saint-Guillaume line;
and in other assorted towns and villages like
Brigham,West Shefford,Knowlton,Roxton Falls &
South Durham. While Quebec
Centrals station at East Angus is still used,
are the stations at Ascot,Saint-Gerard,Weedon,Disraeli and
Black Lake demolished?
If observant readers will communicate these situations to
the Editor of CANADIAN RAIL -together with photographic
proof,where possible -the survivors will be listed in a
future issue of the magazine.
IN
THE DEAD OF WINTER, THERE .JERE OFTEN MORE LEASED THAN COMPANY­
owned units on CP RAIL freights around Montreal. For example, one
day
in January, Train 96 for Quebec left St. Lue Yard with a
derated GP35 on the point, followed by a PRENCO IIPaducah Rebuild
ll
Geep and trailed by an aged Boston & Maine RS3. Bellequip Com­
panys Geeps were ubiquitous; in December 71, one was lIencourag­
ing CP RAILs incredible anachronism, CLC -FM 2400 hp. ITrainmaster II,
No. 8903 on an outbound freight. (K. Goalett)
CANADIAN
98 R A I L
THE REPORT THAT THE CITY OF LONDON,ONTARIO,HAD SOLD
some of the ex-London & Port stanley Raihiays cars,
presently held as the nucleus of a science and trans­
portation museum,is entirely unfounded. Apparently,
the story originated when the London Museums Board
put out some feelers in the summer of 1971,to see if
the cars could be sold if such action became necessary.
Perhaps these feelers sounded too positive and the
organizations which were approached hastened to an­
nounce that they had acquired the cars. It was not
so. The rolling stock is being retained by the City
of London,in anticipation of the eventual organiza­
tion of the museum of science and transportation de­
scribed in a previous issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
(C .A. Andreae)
SHARP-EYED OBSERVERS MAY HAVE SPOTTED A BRIEF NOTICE WHICH IS PRIN­
ted alongside the GMDL-London builders plates on Canadian National
Railways SD40s,road numoers 5224-52l.J·0.The notice says that these
units are o~med by General Motors Diesel Limited,as indeed they are.
For the moment, anyway. The units were ordered by CN for 1972 del­
ivery but, due to excess production capacity,GMDL decided to build
them in late 71. Thus,during the interval until the contract de­
livery date, CN may be operating the units but GMDL still owns them and
probably receives a very satisfactory lease payment for their
use by CN until the specified delivery date arrives. (C. De Jean)
THE RECORD SAYS THAT THE LAST REGULARLY-SCHEDULED ,
revenue service passenger train in the United sta­
tes of America,hauled by a steam locomotive, regular­
ly rostered for this run, was Train 56 -the Inter­
national -of the Grand Trunk Western Railroad Com­
pany, llhich ran east from Durand, Michigan to Detroit.
The date was December 27,1960 and the engine was a
GTVI 6300-class,probably No. 6323. It would be inter­
esting to know if the train and engine numbers are
correct and if a similar date and data can be estab­
lished for the last, regularly scheduled steam-hauled
passenger train that ran in Canada. (S.S.W.)
ON-AGAlII, OFF-AGAIN PENN CENTRAL TRAINS 60 & 61 -NEW YORK-ALBANY­
Buffalo-Cleveland-South Bend-Chicago -which ,lere discontinued be­
yond Buffalo when AMTRAK erupted on May 1,1971, were subsequently
restored on l~y ll,when the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Indiana and Illinois promised to help subsidize operating losses •
After six months of operation, AMTRAK reported fewer than 45 pas­
sengers a day on the trains, ,lith a resulting operating loss of some
$ 3 million annually projected. When the states along the route did
not come through with the promised subsidies, AMTRAK discontinued the
two trains effective January 6,1972. Erie,Pa. and Cleveland, Ohio
both very large cities -were once again without a passenger train
service. (J.J.Shaughnessy)
CANADIAN
99
R A I L
Mr. L. Kei11er of Dorva1,Que.,observed in January,1972,
that Canadian National Railways had removed the rails on
the siding leading from the Lachine Industrial Spur -for­
merly the main line ,.,rest of Canadian National -to Lachine
Wharf,some hundreds of feet south across Notre Dame Street
to the wharf on the shore of Lake st. Louis. Mr. Kei11er
believes that this is the last sentence in the one-hundred­
and-twenty-four year history of the Montreal and Lachine
Rail Road,opened in 1847 from Bonaventure station on Cha­
boi11ez Square,Montrea1 to Lachine Wharf in the village of
Lachine. This extension to the wharf was probably the last
portion of the original railroad of 1847,the remainder of
the line from Bonaventure station through Saint-Henri Jun­
ction,C$te-Saint-Pau1,Turcot Yard -East,Centre and West –
to Vi11e-Saint-Pierre,Rockfie1d,Convent and Lachine having
been very considerably rebu11t over the years by the Grand
Trunk Railway Company of Canada and totally obliterated in
the Vil1e-Saint-Pierre -Turcot section in 1966, when the
Bonaventure Autoroute was constructed.
Roger Boisvert·s report that the new CP RAIL units from General Mo­
tors Diesel,London,schedu1ed for 1972 delivery, would be SD40-2s
caused a good deal of discussion among diese1-e1ectric locomotive
Ilexperts. Several reasons for this new model number lere advanced
but it took Ken Gos1ett and Charlie De Jean to unravel the Why and
Wherefore. At the time the SD45 was announced,GMDL decided to use
the E~ID-designed SD45 frame on Canadian-made SD40 units, thus saving
one potential design change. The natural variant on the SD45 design
was a passenger version,which had a 3-foot addition to the frame
to accommodate the steam generator. Nee61ess to say, there weren.t
many takers for this passenger model.
Ken and Charlie point out that the SD40-2s will be different from
the normal SD40 in three ways and these differences should justify
the creation of the _211 sub-model. Number one: the SD40-2s will
have modular electrical and automatic airbrake systems. Number two:
the SD40-2s will ride on the improved design EMD IIhigh adhesion
trucks -not DOFASCOs IIHIADII truck, which MLW Industries uses on
its M-series units. Number three: the SD40-2s will have SDP45 fra­
mes -longer by three feet than the conventional SD40 frame -to
permit additona1 fuel capacity a 1a Illinois Centra1s SD40-A. The
new SD40-2 carbody should be reproportioned accordingly or the crew
will have added outdoor recreational facilities readily available
on either end of the unit. Baseball to the front! Football to the
rear!
EASTERN CANADA IS NOT THE ONLY AREA THAT CAN BOAST OF
leased power on CP RAIL. Be11equip, BAR and even some B&M
units have been seen in (of all places) southern British
Columbia. Contrariwise,Montrea1 rarely if ever sees the
units from the Du1uth,M1ssabi & Iron Range Railroad or
those from the Lake Superior & Ishpeming. Leased units on
GP RAn. … 1111 be a fact of life for some time. Some B&M

CANADIAN
101
R A I L
units have been on lease to CP RAIL continuously for over
two years and the Bellequip units received in October,1971
are on an 18-month lease. (R. Boisvert)
WRITING TO THE EDITOR OF CANADIAN RAIL, READER JOHN WELSH CONGRATULA­
ted Mr. Lorne C. Perry on his excellent article in the December,1971
issue of the magazine. Mr. Welsh brought to the attention of the Ed­
itor that there is another non-AMTRAK passenger train service opera­
ted by a Canadian Railway in the United States. The trains in ques­
tion are Canadian National Railways Trains 687 (Monday, Wednesday &
Friday) and 686 (Tuesday,Thursday & Saturday),between Thunder Bay,
Ontario and Winnipeg, Manitoba, via Baudette,Minnesota and Warroad,in
the same State -36.4 miles, according to CNs October 31,1971 public
timetable. Presumably,CN is locked into a 5-year situation here, as
CP RAIL is in their northern Maine operation. Just in case you would
like to explore this ex-Canadian Northern line, Train 687 departs
Thunder Bay,Ontario at 0930 hours on the days noted and arrives at
rlinnipeg at 2005 hours on the same day,covering a distance of 438.3
miles at an average speed of about 41.7 mph.
OF SPECIAL INTEREST THIS WINTER ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
CP RAIL were six Precision National Corporation (PRENCO )
units -three GP7s,Nos. 969,970 and 971,all high-nose,and
three Paducah Rebuilds. These latter Geeps had been re­
built by the Illinois Central Railroad in their shops at
Paducah, Kentucky. The prime movers were put together with
645E-series components, revised air-intake systems with pa­
per air filters, modified electrical systems and low-noses.
Road numbers are 3419,3445 and 3634. All units arrived at
CP RAILs St. Luc Yard,Montreal in December,1971 and were
painted in a colourful green and yello.!. (K. Goslett)
ROBERVAL & SAGUENAYS ORDER FOR TWO M-42OTR END-CABS -rumored
to be IIgiant switchers -originally progranuned
by
I4LVl Industries for January,1971 delivery, have been
once again set back to February, 1972 delivery, The frames
,,,ere not on the erecting floor as of January 17,1972 and
the cabs and carbodies had not been started. Interspersed
on the erecting floor were some of the units of a 54-unit
MLVT Industries export model for Nigerian Raihlays, said to
be similar in design to the order for the East African
railways, completed in 1971. (K. Goslett)
= :::::c -::c: =3
ONE OF CP RAILS 21 UNITS, BUILT BV CANADIAN LOCOMOTIVE COMPANV,KINGSTDN,
Ont.,classsd as DRS-24,unit No. 89n1 -a Fairbanks-Morse TRAINMASTER -WBS
caught by KRn De Jean at Hochelaga Vard,Montreal,on November 4,1956.This
unit was an FM model H-24-66,developed 2,400 hp. and had a 12-cylinder
o-p 850 rpm hrime mover. It is now retired from service by CP nAIL.
CANADIAN 102 R A I L
IT COULD BE SAID THAT THE QUEBEC,NORTH SHORE & LABRADOR RAILWAY IS
one of the largest customers of General Motors Diesel Limited. Now
that the order for fifteen SD40s has been completed (October, 1971)
QNS&L has decided that it needs forty more -20 for spring 72 de­
livery and 20 for spring 73. Ferrocarriles Naqionales de Mexico
is booked for ten SD4os -the order having been transferred from
GM-EMD,La Grange,to less busy GMDL -and British Columbia Hydro
is in line for two SD38s. Another consortium of Mexican railroads
has declared for 28 M-line units from MLW Industries, divided into
eight M-636s and twenty M-630s. Betleen times, GMDL is building
such horrors as three SW-1200-MG electrics for the Iron Ore Com­
pany of Canada -1200 hp. motor-generator electric switchers. In
the days of silicon rectifiers, choppers and thyristors,an electric
locomotive with a built-in motor-generator set is something of a
curiosity. Perhaps these nei units will disprove -once and for all­
the often-quoted claim that while GMDLs prime movers are great,
their electrics stinkl (Goslett -De Jean)
• SAN FRANCISCOS BART SYSTEM, SCHEDULED TO OPEN IN HARCH,1972,GOT A
setback in January,when a strike at Rohr Industries plant in Chula
Vista,California,stopped work on the 60 cars essential for the open­
ing of the Oakland-Fremont line. Only one of the production model
cars had been delivered ~nd 12 lead cars were needed ahead of the
scheduled delivery date.s to test the train control operations. Two
of the test cars were badly damaged in a collision November 2,1971,
when a train of Cars 104 & 105 slammed into a parked train of Cars
102 & 103 at the 73rd.-San Leandro station. The train was under man­
ual control at the time. The first official passenger train was a
10-car Directors Special
u
on December l7,197l,on the occasion of
the opening of the new BART headquarters in Oakland. Train consist
was Car 504 -a production model -and 9 test cars. The dummy model
car, used for display for the past six years in the Bay area -has
been sold to Atlanta (Georgia) Transit for $ 1,000 to help Beat the
Drum for rapid transit in that southern city. (WESTERN RAILROADER)
WARNING
For your own protection it is advised not to use the Rail­
road Bridge
that spans the Rideau River (the bridge
from Vincent Massey Park to Carleton)
The C.P. police have within the last week charged two
Carleton
students with tress passing on Rai lroad Property.
The
police are within their rights to do this.
If charged with this offense, you are liable to a fine.
-Ombudsman office.
The CHARLATAN, Carleton University
Ottawa. December,1971
e ::xc :r :::::r;
ONCE UPON A TIME,NO.77 I~A5 CNS I!O. 7700 ON THE uJIRE TRAIN AT TURCOT CENTRE,
Montreal,June 20,1947. Photo courtesy C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.

FROM THE ASSOCIATION e
C.lLNADIAN RAIL·
publl.ned by -he
ARCHIVES
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EDITOR. B.S V DISTRIBUTION
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