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Canadian Rail 240 1972

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Canadian Rail 240 1972

401.h annlVeU· .. ary
:rT<>~ 940
J.A.1VYJ.A.F.V
1972

IIII~ IIIIIIIIIL S
S
Illii
S-IIIIEIIII~
IIII~
1IIIIt
weston Langford.
is an easy temptation to extoll
the virtues of a railway scene
outside the Americas by boast­
ing of the presence of active
steam-locomotive power. At the
other extreme, one may stipulate
the similarity -to a degree-
with present-day Mexican and
Central American practice to
arouse a modicum of interest.
IIIILIllil
The state of Western Australia -most westerly of the pol­
itical divisions forming the Commonwealth of Australia -offers a
little of both of these extremes,in that steam operation is still
a significant factor in the operation of the government lines in
the south, whilst two of the three new industrial lines on the north­
west coast are operated by standard North American diesel power, as
opposed to modified export versions.
The railways of v]estern Australia may be divided into three
groups. The se are the Ylestern Australia Government Raih,ays (HAGR),
,hose operations are confined to the south,est part of the state
the western portion of the Commonwealth Railways transcontinental
line and the private iron-ore lines on the northwest coast.
The 1>1AGR, whose operations date from 1879,now operate 3,720
miles of 3 6-gauge right-of-way and 440 miles of 4 8~-gauge li­
nes. Ur.til 1917, the 36 -gauge system. in Vlestern Australia was iso­
lated,but ir. that year,the Commonwealth Railways line was opened,
thus affording a connection with the lines in the east. Unfortunate­
ly, the CR s line was 4 1 8~ -gauge, so that no through running was at
that time possible. In 1968,a ne,,, standard-gauge line, operated by
WAGR, ~;as opened betvreen Perth and Kalgoorlie, replacing the former
narrow-gauge (3
1
6) line and,at last,a through cor.nection was pro­
vided to the eastern states of the Commonwealth.
—THE FRONT COVER THIS MONTH PORTRAYS WrlAT IHGHT BE CONSIDERED A.S THE
typical Canadian diesel. General ~;otors Diese11s GP-9 is represen­
ted by CP RAILs class DRS-17b Number 8535. Photo courtesy CP RAIL.
~ DD 592 Up A.R.H.S. Special, Perth City Station:
The appearance of a typical perth,W.A. steam suburban train was re­
created on 14-II-70 for an excursion by the vlestern Australia Di­
vision of the Australian Railway Historical Society. The engine,
L~-6_4T no. 592, was built by the 1rlAGR at Iud land Junction vlorkshops
ir. 1946. Photo 14-II-70. J,.A .Joyce.
CANADIAN 4 R A I L
At the present time, there are approximately 100 steam loco­
motives in daily service on the HAGR 3 G-gauge lines. Of the st­
eam pOler still viable in recent years, most was of post-l-TVl II con­
struction by British builders -the most numerous types being lj·-6-2
Pacifics and L~-8-2s.
The V class Mikados -24 in number -were the last
steam engines to be placed in service (1955/6). They weigh
new
134
(long) tons and are the largest non-articulated engines to operate
on the government narrow-gauge (3 6) in Australia.
Suburban passenger services out of Perth were operated by
t10 closely similar classes of Lf-6-4 side-tank locos. A particular
feature of steam locomotive design in Hestern Australia las the pro­
vision for burning the low-calorific-value Collie coal.
The first narrow-gauge main-line diesel units were placed in
service in 1954. These were rather unorthodox, double-cab 2-D-2s
built in England by MetropoHtan Vickers. Initially, these units were
not successful and it was not until significant modification had be­
en undertaken that the 48 new units were of any real use.
Subsequent ma:tn-line locomotives for both gauges have been
Australian-built General Motors and English Electric models.
General Motors models built for the narrow-gauge so far have
been variants of the G12 series and five G16 2,000 hp. units
now on order.
The
all
are
The English Electric R class 2,000 hp. C-C hood units vlere
the first narrow-gauge units in this power range in Australia. Pos­
sibly the most significant recent development on the HAGR has been
the introduction of the standard-gauge L class,which is a modi­
fied form of the Gr.f domestic-production snLro model. The Principal
difference is the reduction in vleight to accommodate an axle I.eight
of 22.5 long tons.
On the rails of the HAGR,the main commodities handled on the
governments system are grain and mineral ores. ~Ihilst grain is e~
ported from all of the major ports -Albany,Bunbury,Fremantle and
Geraldton -most grain is transllipped at various intermediate pOints
on the standard-gauge line and then hauled in block (unit) trains to
Fremantle. The newest equipment in this service is aluminum grain
cars Vii th a tare weight of 1·7 long tor.s and a capacity of 75 tons.
This represents an increase of 10 tons over steel cars with the
same axle Ieight.
Iron ore from the Dampier }>!ir.ing Companys operatior. at Ko­
olyanobbing – 282 miles east of Perth on the star:darcl-e;auge line
is the most important item carried. This traffic is llandled by 96-
car unit trains, hauled by three of the Clyde-GM 3,000 hp. units.The
total cycle time,including loading ar.d discharge, over the 312-mile
route from Koolyanobbing to Kwinar.a -r.ear Perth -is 25 hours.
There are two smaller unit-trair. operations, both on the
narlow-gauge and both from mir.es worked by thE; {estern Minir.g Com­
pany. One is for iron ore from Hestmine to Geraldton and the other
for bauxite from Jarrahdale to Kwinana.
CANADIAN 5 R A I L

.lest.ern Australia

500 miles -=I
C===~======~==
,

,/AGR lines, net,lork
ilest of
Kalgoorlie
Comrnonl1eal th lj.ne, East
of: J(algoorlie
The latter operation is of particular interest. The
have a
gross trailing load of 4,500 long tons and are hauled
of the 2,000 hp. English Electric units. Although the haul is
of only some 40 miles,its real significance is the scale of
operation for a 3 6
11
-gauge railway.
trains
by 2
short,
the
Passenger traffic plays a minor but important role in the
overall picture of ilAGR activity. The two major operations are the
Perth suburban service -more than three routes totalling some 40
miles -and the Kalgoorlie to Perth portion of the transcontinental
service. The suburban runs are operated with diesel-hydraulic rail­
cars with additional d iesel-ur.i t-hauled trains in the peak periods.
CANADIAN
6
.11estmine

PGRTH
FremanCIe
Klinana
1
(
Western Australian
Government RailYlays
R A I L
3 I 6 gaur;e
4 I 81z gauge
Kalgoorlie
dual [;8uge I t I
Map showing lines of the Western Australian Government
Railways. Courtesy of the author.
-. W 910 & s 544 on Train 104 at Collie, 1,<1 .A. :
On June 14,1970,one could photograph a typical stearn-railroading
scene on the HAGR. The lead ing er~gine is one of 60 built in 1951/2
by Beyer Peacock,most of Hhich are still in service. The second
engine – S 544 -another 4-8-2,was one of 10 built by the HAGH. at
Midland Junction Horkshops betwep-n 1943 and 19L~7. Note the diminu­
tive water-car between the two locomotives.
Photo 14-VI-70 J.A.Joyce
I
I

CANADIAN
9
R A I L
t
AB 1533 at Ivlid land 1 1 .. / .A OJ on standard-gauge bogies:
Hith the completion of the transcontinental standard-gauge line,
the delivery of new units to the Hestern Australia Government Rail­
lay las greatly simplified. Manufactured at Clyde Engineerings
worlcs at Granville -near Sydney,N .S.H. -this GM unit was hauled
on star.dard-gauge non-powered trucks to the VlAGR r s works at Mid land,
near Perth,where the 36-gauge,3-axle power trucks were fitted.
Photo 26-XII-69 J.A.Joyce
… Unit 5461+ at Mount Newman:
~1ount Newnan Minings Goodvlin-ALCO C-636 no. 5461-1· at Mount Newman,
W.A.
Since the termir.ation of production by ALCO in the United
States, component parts from that source for these units are now
manufactured by MLH-Horthingtor.,Limited,Montreal,Canada.
Photo VII-70 J.A.Joyce
A nominal passenger train service is operated,in addition,
betleCn the state capital of Perth and the cities of Bunbury, Albar.y,
Kalgoorlie,f·1ullewa and Geraldton, but with the exception of the Bun­
bury service,these trains have gradually assumed the character of
fast freights with passenger equipment tagged on to the rear.
The iron ore raihTaYs on the northvlest coast represent a
complete departure in practice from that hitherto known in Australia.
Two of these lines could be said to resemble North American-style
CANADIAN
10
R A I L
railroading, both ir. scale and ir. lforking methods. Three lines, all
standard-gauge,are no{ in operation. These are:
-Port Hedland to GoldsvlOrthy 70 miles
operated by the Mt. Goldsvlorthy Mining Company;
-Dampier
to Mount Tom Price 182 miles
,i th an extension to Parabadoo 62 miles
under construction
operated by Hamersly Iron Company;

Port Hedland to Mount Newroar. 265 miles
operated by Mount NeYTman Mir.ing Company.
The
Goldsl.,orthy operation is small by comparison with the
others, its diesel unit fleet meing composed of 950 hp. ar.d 1,950 hp.
English Electric units.
On the other t10 lines, the main motive power is the Austral­
ian-built ALCO C-628,Clyde-EMD F7 and ALGO c-4l5 (one) demonstrator
unit. Present-day train loads on the Hamersly and Mount Newman lin­
es are of the order of 10,000 long tons and on the Hamersly line,
train loads of 30,000 long tons are plar.ned.
Since 1965,more than 900 route miles of railway have been
opened in Ylesterr. Australia and more nelf lines are planned. This in
itself is something of a record and it would be interesting to de­
termine how many years have passed since this amount of mileage was
brought into use within the boundaries of a single territory.
yet in the midst of this up-to-date development, toe preser.­
ce of reminders of former times is refreshing. Until recer.tly, it
was possible to see a diesel unit, similar to an sD40 and a steam
locomotive in revenue freight service on adjacent tracks simultan­
eously and there was then no other place in the world vlhere this
remarkable view was possible. It is probable that at the beginning
of the seventieth decade of the twentieth century, joint steam and
diesel working, even in Vlestern Australia, is a very rare thing,
indeed.
The author Vlould like to acknowledge the kind assistance
of Mr. John Joyce, Perth, Vlestern Australia, vlho provided
the photographs and Mr. John Hearsch of Melbourne,Vic­
toria,in the preparation of this article,
The Board of Directors of the Canadian Railroad Historical Associa­
tion have requested that the following statement be published in an
issue o£ CANADIAN RAIL:
The
opinions expressed by the Editor and by Authors in
CANADIAN RAIL are those of the Editor and/or the Authors
and are not necessarily those of the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association.
N
DIESELS
~–~IEAST
FIRST SECTION
S
Chris Martin.
C !-IRIS HARTIN, ASSOCIATION MEaillER
from London, Ontario -flome of the SD-40
and. other fabulous monsters -sends llS
a selection ot pictures of motive p01ler
used by raihlays in and around Ilis home
tovm.
Its 1500 hours on June 15,1970 in the picture
opposite and CP H.AILs Extra 4208 rest, ,qith
100 cars is heading for Hindsor,Ontario. Power
on the point is Number !~208 – a C-42!~ -backed
by twin Number 4209 and a GP-35,Number 5003.
Only tile latter was at Ilome.
Later the same day,CP RAIL Extra 4222
-lest rolled another 100 cars of mixed
freight towards Halkerville,Ontario
and thence-to Hindsor Yard at the
Hindsor-Detroit Gateway. power was a
pair of C-424 , s -Numbers 4222 & !~207.
In the tllird photograph, second-generation Canadian
National Rail,~ays power hauls a heavy train of
automobile parts over the summit at Lobo, several
miles west of London. PONering tile train ~as an
SD-40, Number 5020, an M-636, Number 2327 and a sec­
ond SD-40,Number 5025. In this case, the home-made
products llad the edgel
The May 1,1971 excursion of the Forest
City Raillay Society, from London to
Goderich,Ontar10,over Canadian National
Raihray I s Strathroy, Exeter and Goderich
Subdivisions, rounds the curve at Hyde
Park in the last pllotograph. Hyde Par],
is the junction of the Strathroy and
Exeter siDs -otherwise the main line
to Sarnia and the conr.ection betl-leen it
and tlle Goderich Sub., which the branch
.joins at Clinton Junction, 45.6 miles
farther on. Power on this occasion ·as
a unique FPA-4 and an RS-18 team.

0
Til IlltSTOI
LOCOMOTIII WOIIS
IIS8 ~ 1919
1r F.A.Kemp
~n the midst of all the wailing and eulogies attending
the demise of ALCO Schenectady, descendant of the once-great Ameri­
can Locomotive Company, another once-great Canadian steam and not­
sO-ltfellknown diesel engine builder has quietly closed its doors,
almost unnoticed, except by the 600 people who lost their jobs and,
possibly,by the citizens of Kingston,Ontario,where this Company
Has a long-established institution. Latterly,this lIaS the Kingston
plant of Fairbanks-Ivlorse (Canada) Limited,formerly the Canadian
Locomotive Company Limited. Its life-span 1aS almost the same as
that of the American Locomotive Company of Schenectady; its pro-
duction about one-tenth,but its products were of as great or great­
er importance in the development of Canadian railiays as Americans
were in the United States.
The Company 1aS first organized in 1850,as a partnership
betleen lvIessrs. Morton and Duncan. KnOVIn as the Ontario Foundry, it
turned out its first locomotive in 1856, the year tllat the Grand Tr­
unk Haihlay Company of Canada completed its Nontreal-Toronto ll1:l in
line through Kingston.
In 1065, the prospering Company Vias purcllasc:d by a group
of business men,who renamed it the Canadian Engine and Machinery
-Iorks. By 18(1, it was building locomot ives for the follovling Can­
ad ian raihlays:
The Grand 1run), Raih/ay
The Great Hesten: Raih1ay
1he Nova Scotia Rath-Iay
The Northern laihlay
The st. La1lrence & OttaVla RaihJaY
The Brockvi!lle & OttaHB-RaihJaY
1he Midland Raihlay
1he Cobourg & Peterboro Hailvlay
The Toronto & Nipissing Railway
The Intercolonial Raih/ay
In the same year, the neT Company listed the following Directors
and OIf ice rs :
P
resident
Vice-Pres ident
Managing Director
Secretary and Treasurer
Superintendent of Works
Henry Yates,Esq.,Brantford,Ont.
R .J .Ree kie, Esq., Ivlontrea 1, Que.
R
.J~Reelcie, Esq.
Charles Gilbert, Esq., Kingston,Ont.
G.J.Tandy,Esq.,Kingston,Ont.
CANADIAN
Directors
17
R A I L
Henry Yates,Esq.,Brar.tford,Or:t.
R.J .Reekie,Esq .,1lontreal,QuEi.
Geo. stephen,Esq.,/Viontreal,Que.
Robert Cassels,Bsq.,Qu6bec,Que.
John SheddenEsq., Toronto, Ont.
B(;sides beir:g manufacturers of locomotive engines, the
Company also listed railway cars, sn011 ploughs, iroD railllay bridges
and other laih1ay accessories ir: its advertisemeDts. The Iorks at
Kingston replesented a capital investment of about $ 250,000, so
these same advert isemeDts stated.
In Hl81, the Honorable H:i.lliam Harty of KiDgston purchas­
ed the Company, -by this time called the Canadian Engine and Ma­
chinery Company and renamed it Canadian Locomotive and Engine Com­
paDy, but lost control of it in 1886, Hhen George stephen (a former
Director) and other financiers associated lith the Canadian Pac-
ific Raihray,Ilho had supplied much of the purchase money, sold
their interest to the Scottish locomotive-building firm of DUbs
and Company of Glasg01,thus beginning the Companys first period
of fore igD control, 1>111 ich lasted unt il 1900.
At the turn of t lJe century, the Honorable Mr. Harty re­
purchased control of the Company and again Damed it the Canadian
Locomot i ve Company Limited. It NaS incorporated in 1911. After the
diesel-electric locomotive era dawned,about 1950,the Company came
increasingly under the control of the United States firm of Fair­
banks, Morse and Company and finally became a part of Fairbanks­
Morse (Canada) Limited in the early 1960 s.
The Companys products in the early years Ilere mainly
the usual light L~_li–O types of the period,for the Provincial gauge
(5 feet 6 inches),tl1e NarrQ>./ Gauge () feet six inches) and the st-
andard or Stephenson (4 feet 8~ inches) gauge),-the latter with
less frequency. 2-6-0,4-6-0 and 2-8-0 types of steam engines pre­
dominated in the 1890s,11ith 4-6-2 and 2-8-2 and other larger types
being introduced in the 1900s. Its largest steam locomotive pro­
ducts were Canadian National class T-4 2-10-2 type nos. 4100-4104,
outshopped in 192L~, but the several subclass groups of class U-2
4-8-4 type engines Here much better known and the streamlined u-4
class (6L,LOO-6404) of 1936,although seldom seen,were featured in
Canadian National publicity and hauled Hoyal Trains in 1939 and
1951.
Most of the steam locomotives built at KiDgston llere
purchased for use on Canadian railways, but among the last steamers
built were some streamlined 4-6-2 t,),pes for the Ind ian Haih-mys ,Oc­
cas ionally, small fore ign orders 1ere obtained, but the Company was
never as active in the export market as its rival, the Montreal
Locomotive Ilorks.
The Canadian Locorrotive Company cooperated .lith other
companies in building electric locomotives and in the development
, NEAT LIlfLE t!OGUL NUliBER 744 …. AS BUILT FOR Ti-iE GRAND TRUNK 1AIUiAY
T Company of Canada by toe Canadian Locorr.oti ve COlloany, Kl.ngstan ,O!ltarl0
in lR91. choto courtesy L.C.Perry Collection.
Th~ builders nlflte on Canadian Pacific Unit Number 8903 read DRS-24B
~ rath~r than H-24_66 when It was Dhotof(rapheci at ,Uyth Shoo,Calp-arY,Al-
t
berta,on Aup-ust 20,1969. Photo courtesy R.A.Loat.
:lore than three-qulilrt~rs of a century lat~r.CLC-F~: model H-16-44 –
otherwise Canadian Pacific Railway Unit ~unber 8726 oosed for its
Dortrait at Calgary,Alta.,on October 5.1968.?hoto courtesy R.h.Loat.
L

CA NAD I AN
22
R A I L
CANADIAN
23
R A I L
of three early diesel-electric locomotives for the Canadian Nation­
al, but its first large-scale venture into the diesel-electric field
las unsuccessful, to say the least. This was an order for 20 units
of Baldvlin-Eddystone des ign for the Prince Ed of Canadian National Railways, in 1948. After a series of frequent
road failures, the 20 units were rejected by CN and had to be dis­
posed of elSe·lhere. Follov/ing this setback,CLC adoptecl the designs
of Fairbanl hp. opposed-piston units in 1951. Both major Canadian railvlays
bought CLC units until 1956,vrhen the 2400 hp. Trainmaster road­
siitchers VTere outshopped, virtually ending the building of Fair­
banks-Morse units in Canada. The rumored design deficiencies in
the opposed-piston concept Ile.re by this time becoming apparent in
higher maintenance costs and no additional units were ordered. The
Company
then turned to diesel-hydraulics and Canadian Pacific pur­
chased tlro groups of small hydraulic switchers in 1958-59 ( nos.
10-26 -class HS5a & HS5b). Powdered by reliable Caterpillar en­
gines, their transmissions are actually hydro-mechanical and the
gearboxes and driveshafts have proven troublesome.
The Company acquired the Canadian rights and patents of
Davenport-Besler Company,a United States firm, builder of small in­
dustrial locomotives but produced very little in this direction.Its
last locomotives ,ere diesel-hydraulics, built for Pakistan in 1967
and the plant has been used latterly for other purposes by Fair­
banks-Morse. At one time,it was even used for building boats!
So has ended the Canadian Locomotive Company of Kingston,
like Schenectady, Baldwin and Lima and for many of the same reasons.
CLC really lasted only a little longer than it should have, by all
of the laws and conditions of economics. Nevertheless, its products
will be remembered -for better or for worse -8S long as steel
wheels run on steel rails.
And the controversy which first arose … Then the opposed
piston design was first translated into a reality will continue,
even up to the latest generation of diesel-electric locomotive en­
thus iasts 1
aaOOOOQOOOODOOO
~CAUGHT AT THE YARD LIMIT BOARD AT OSOYOOS.B.C •• CP RAIL EXTRA WEST 8720 • . –
lwith CLC-FM H-16-44 heading into town on Septe~ber 13.1966.
A TRIO OF H-24-66s -UNITS 8909.8917 AND 8903 -TRUNDLE EXTRA WEST
8909 -The Keith Turn -past the east switch at Keith.Calgary.Alta ••
on January 25.1970.
~CP RAIL UNIT 4076 -CLC-F¥. CFA-16-4 -(UGLY?) RELAXES AT ALYTH SHOP.
Calgary.Alberta.on September 16.1967 – a nice day1
TWO CP RAIL CLC-FM CPA 16-4S -UNITS 4104 & 4053 -WORK FOR THEIR
keep on Train 74 at Cranbrook,B.C. on a bright February 22.1970.
All of the above photos courtesy Robert A. Loat.
t
JUST ABOUT THE NEWEST THING OUTSHOPPED BY HLW INDUSTRIES,~10lTREAL –
next to the Pacific Great Easterns M-630s,that is -were the B-B,
1,000 hn. jobs for the Jamaica Railway Company,photographed in May,
1971. Photo courtesy MLW Industries.
IN THE DAYS WHEN CP RAIL S ~iULTIIIARK WAS NEW. UNITS 4242 & 4239 vJERE
nosed and nhotographed from Montreal to Vancouver -lit8rally. The
tynical prairie cicture was taken beside the ubiquitous grain e18va-
tor at Grand Coulee,Saskatchewan. Photo courtesy CP RAIL.
~ A MORE THAN ~IElIORABLE OCCASION IN THt<; PERIOD OF lHE PA-1 S WAS THE DAY
r 1n February.1969,w~en Canadian Pacific power nulled the northbound D&H
Laurentian through r~echanicville.New York. Goodness knows where the
PA-1s werel Photo courtesy J.J.Shau~hnessy.

_IIIILL8
Editorial Staff CANADIAN RAIL
WHITE PASS & YUKON ROtITE –
otherwise (and better) known as THE CONTAINER ROtITE
has been busy constructing a new car and engine repair
shop at Skagway,Alaska, adjacent to the ruins of the
old shops which were destroyed by fire two years ago.
The new building has a heavy-duty concrete floor area
0f 200 x 200 feet and is enclosed by a polyurethane
foam layer of insulation sandwiched between metal walls
lvi th a flat stee 1 roof.
One side of the building is the diesel-electric repair
shop,>lith a heavy-duty repair track 180 feet long, to
accommodate three diesel units at a time. Alongside is
a running repair track of the same length with a full­
length pit for changing traction motors.
The division between this and the car repair and main­
tenance shop is provided by a machine shop, tractor and
loader repair area, woodworking shop, stores and parts
room and offices, including a lunchroom area.
The car shop has two tracks 200 feet long for the re­
build ing of passenger coaches a.nd repair of flat cars •
Would you
believe that outside of one (1) boxcar in
questionable condition, the WP&YR has only two (2) types
of cars -flats and passenger cars?
YlP&YR Staff Engineer Charlie Brown emphasizes that con­
siderable care and attention has been paid to fire pre­
vention and retardant details,as well as adequate lay­
out to assure efficient operation.
Elsewhere on the CONTAINER ROtITE -at Hile 14 (Glacier,
Alaska) – a new steel bridge has replaced the historic
but antequated A-frame wooden trestle. The new steel
viaduct is 76 feet long and about 40 feet high and as
deSigned by Kir…len Engineering Limited of Vancouver, for
erection around and outside the old A-frame trestle.
Thus,traffic was uninterrupted during construction.
TORONTO TRANSIT COMl>1ISSION
recently sold a superannuated ·t;rolley bus to a group of s1 udents of
Centennial College,Toronto. You >lOuldnrt believe what they intend
to do lith it. First, they bought it for $ 125 and intend to strip
it of some $ 140 worth of scrap. Next, they will convert it into a
house-boat for cruises next April on the Great Lakes.
The converted trolley bus will be water-borne by sixty 45-gallon
steel drums encased in pontoons. The body of the bus will have a
sun-deck on the roof and a walkway around its sides. Inside, there
will be a living and dining area,a kitchen, washrooms and sleeping
cubicles for about 20 persons. Applicable tolls for operating the
contraption in the St. Lawrence Seaway hopefully >lill be established
by 1973.
CANADIAN
28
R A I L
~MTRAK -the great experiment in publicly­
sponsored but privately-operated pas­
senger train service,presently being
conducted in the United States,is in
the spotlight. It is not easy to be
the principle character in this new
productionl
Proponents of government-subsidized public rail passenger tr­
ansport are watching for any signs of success -which are few at
present -while the railroads,having opted into the plan at con­
siderable long-term expense,are looking for their rent money.
Opponents of both are looking for any errors or omissions
which they can use in their fight to abolish -once and for all –
thid antique transportation mode.
Already there are signs of dissatisfaction and discontent. Mr.
Anthony Haswell,chairman of the National Association of Railroad
Passengers has accused the participating railroads of bleeding more
money
out of the United States I Congress just to throw down their
rat-hole •
Meanwhile,the National Railroad Passenger Corporation -parent
of AMTRAK -has been keeping a tight lid on information about its
operation. But lid or no lid, Chairman and President Roger Lewis of
AMTRAK does not deny reports that internal projections show that
operating losses are running at an annual rate of $ 150 million or
more,against a direct federal appropriation of $ 40 million -to get
AMTRAK started -plus a federal guarantee of $ 100 million in loans
plus $ 197 million in entrance fees from the railroads that elected
to join the M~RAK scheme to escape their increasing passenger train
losses. This latter amount is payable over 3 years.
AMTRAK has asked participating railroads not to discuss details
of the passenger train operation they perform. However, an executive
of one road pOints out that the daily-in-each-direction AMTRAK train
that his company runs realizes only 60 cents per mile on a 300-mile
service that it costs A}ITRAK $ 11 a mile to run.
Hhile AMTRAK is rumored to be preparing another request
U.S.Congress for more money,the report on the first year of
operation is due on May 1,1972. The figures cited above are
on projections from the first six months of experience.
CP RAIL REBUILT IN 1971
37 MLH-built class DRF-30c,d and f units at Angus Shops,
Montreal,to create complete master units for coal unit­
train operation in British Columbia. Some renumbering
was required in order to differentiate between LOCOTROL
and PACESETTER masters,by road numbers:
Road Number or No. of Former
Netl Road Number uni ts equipment Remarks
to the
AMTRAK
based
4500-4512,inc. 13 PACESETTER
Repeaters
Not for modification.
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INTERCITY
PASSENGER
ROUTES
National Railroad Passenger Corporation
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CANADIAN
)0
4550-4557, inc. 8 PACESETTER
Masters
4558-4561, inc. 4 PACESETTER
(ex 4513-4516,inc.) Repeaters
4562-4569, inc. 8 LOCOTROL
( ex 45(4-4581, inc. )
4570-4573, inc. 4 LOCOTROL
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Classifications are not changed.
R A I L
Add LOCOTROL & UTSB.
Add LOCOTROL,PACESET­
TER Master & UISB.
Remove
PACESETTER
Repeater.
Add PACESETTER Master
& UTSB.
Add PACESETTER lw.ster
& UTSB.
UTSB is Unit Train Supplementary Brake feature,
combining former grade-holding and grade-balan-
cing brake feature. Roger Boisvert.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
order for 15 3,000 hp. six-motor SD-40s from General Motors Diesel
is Order No. C-345,B/N A-2588 to A-2602,,.,ith road numbers 5226 to
5240, inclusive. The 16 GP-38s are order number C-350,B/N A-2675 to
A-2690,with road numbers 5500-5515,inclusive. A third portion -an
order for 20 SD-40s, is order C-351, B/N A-2691 to A-2710 and the
road numbers are 5241 to 5260,inclusive. Pierre Patenaude.
THE BROCKVILLE ONTARIO TOURISl ASSOCIATION
at a meeting held late in 19(1,pounced on ti·,e idea that
the hundred-year-old Brockville and Ottawa RaihTay tunnel,
now the property of CP RAIL, could repres?nt the basis of
an attraction to lure the tourist dollar. Together with
a museum,a reconstructed blockhouse on BlockhoLlse Island
(~hat else did you expect?) and a Hater-taxi service to
visit the 22 City-o~med islands in the st. Lawrence Ri­
ver,the Tourist Association concluded that Nacdonald­
Cartier Freeway motorists -east and estbound -could be
persuaded to break their journeys at Brockville.
Interest finally focussed on the old tunnel which .muld
be enhanced by a replica of the old train and coaches,
wi th an electric model running through the tunnel to the
waterfront and marina area,Vlith perhaps an amusement park
for the children. Provincial and Federal financial assis­
tance Vlill logically be required.CP RAIL bas not corrnnented.
CANADIAN NATIONALS I~NTREAL-BASED
container distribution terminal -MONT PORT -began another large­
scale expansion in September,1971,the third in two years.Some time
in mid-1972,MONTPORT Vlill have storage capacity for 1,750 containers
and ~Iill have a handling capacity of 1,500 containers per ~,eek – a
·
considerable increase over the 300 units it could handle in 1969 •
MONTPORT presently operates 17 hours per day,5 days a week.It has
a pic!:-up and delivery fleet of )0 trucks to handle 20-foot con­
tainers and 10 units to transport the 40-footers. In June,1971,some
38,000 tons of general container cargo moved into and out of MONT­
PORT -almost triple the figure of one year ago.
CANADIAN
)1
R A I L
AV1O TRAni CORPORATION –
advertised in the Uni teo Stat.es as a revolutlor.ary cor.cept:
lr. pa!loenger transport, inauGurated its r.eu (to the Nortil
American ocer:e) service or: December 0,19(1, 11i)cr. tIle first
passengers left Lorton,Virglr.ia for Sar.ford,F10rida. Hore
tbar. 90 passengers made the lr.auBural tclp,ridir.g in pur­
c
nased 01 leased passengel cars from tile Santa Fe and the
Union Pacific Railroads,refurbished at a cost of $ 1.2 mil­
lion dollars. 60 Of the 90 passengers llere bona fice; the
remaining jO IJere company officials, ir.vcstors and meCliamer:.
26 automobiles were simultaneously trar.sported ir: ~ double­
deck auto:x.bile cars. Owner-passengers were acco!lmlCXlated in
two dome-coach cars with reelir:inz seats,a buffet or dining
car,a night club car and 101,1.1 sleeper:!. There lIas ar. in­.r
ide 11 rrovie.
Departure ex !..Orton, Va. das &.08 p.m. with arrival at
ford,Fla. at 10.52 a.m. next day. The traln rar. avec
5an­
Sea-
board Coast Line trackage and will compete with ~~RAK ser_
vice on the New York-Florida run.
Au.to Train serv1ce is unique in North America in that fam­
ilies and the1r cars are transported 1r. the same train. ThC
fare is $ 190 one way pcr autolOObile,with up to four oc­
cupants. Sleeper accol~atlon (compartment) is $ 40 extra
per couple and if there are more than four people per au.to,
the extra passenger pays $ 15.
The fare 1ncludes dinr:er and cor:tiner.tal breakfast. In some
European countries, trains carryin5 passengers and automo­
b
iles have beer: popular Since 1957. Canadiar. Uational nall-
~ay(J have adverti.seo the CAH-GO-RAIL plar:, bu.t ti,c am1ly
car dOC3 not travel ~(lth tbe family. normally, it !iDJ3t. be
deli/ered to the raih1ay th.ree days prior to the Journey ar.d
r.-ay not be picked u.p by tlle o;q:er-passer:gcr at the destin­
ation for tilo_tbree days att.cr his arrival.
TI!E HAU WHO PRO!·IOlW THE PRAIRIE DOG CENTRAL
Aldercar: and ltember of the Legislative Assembly of Hanltoba, Leonard
H
. Claydon,is dead at the e8.lly age of 55. Aldermar. Cla,Jodor: is best
remembered by Canadian rallwa~ enthusiasts as the man who took a
strong and determined stand on the preservation,restoratlon and ul­
timate operation of ex-!Iinnipeg Hydro 4J.i_O,r.uulber 3 and her train.
It is largely as a result of his efforts that Number; ar:d her t!­
ain at two coaches and a comblr.e -originally facetiously entitled
liThe Claydon Ca.n.nonball -has operated during the last bro summers.
Hr.
Claydon performed two acts of llnu.sual heroism in 1900 and 1969,
when he rescued a boy from Lake 1-1ir:nipeg and three r:lCr. and a woman
fron a sinking boat. For the latter courageous act,ile lias decorated
by tIle Lieuter:ar:t Goverr:or of the Pro …. ir:ce of j,1ar.ltoba. At the time
of hie death,he liaS I,!ember of the EAnltoba Legislature for Holsele,v
arxl Alderman of the City of tSinnipeg.
~-…. –
ONCE UPON A TIME.7rlOU~ANO IS!..AJ.OS RAILo,AY E-B In CO~~ ;::T ALL i:!F.
tro1r.s at GnnB!loque Ju.nctlon.Ont<;lrto.Ju.ly 24,1949. B-3 ~5 today ore­
served on the rlv~:-_rront at GangI10C.le, !hoto CRrlA ~.,;,~oh~· Coll.
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S
~C.AN.A1)tAN R …. IL ..
put:>U.hed by lh.
C1.NAlUN P..A!l.lOADB!5ItmlCAl.1S:O:U:n~f :.:~~..:. .. -….
A •• OO …. .e lI4_=bar.hlp tnOIUd.lnc
Ca.D&d.1an a.All e 00 annually
lCDlTOR as VVorlhen
DISTRll!IUTION J A aeat.lY
ARCHIVES
VISIT VIstTJEZ LJE
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