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Canadian Rail 238 1971

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Canadian Rail 238 1971

PRESIDENT JOHNS,
YOU MAY TURN ON
THE POWER!
S.S.Worthen.
W hen youre zipping along at 70 per –
on
Ontarios Highway 401 –
otherwise, the double-divided
Macdonald -Cartier Freeway,
heading west from Toronto ,
you
may not remember
and
youll never guess
that less than ten miles away
there was once a busy electric
interurban railroadl
Back in what some trolley enthusiasts nostalgically
refer to as liThe Good Old Days,the Toronto Suburban
Railway had an interurban line to the not-too-distant
city of Guelph. And this line passed through this very
locale. The old roadbed is still quite visible for
most of the distance. As far as Georgetown,power line
poles located upon the old right-of-way mark its
path.
In other places -would you believe –
there are today streetcars once again
operating on the line -on sunny
summer Sunday afternoons,that is.
~s you zip along the double-divided highway,you should
keep a lookout for Interchange 38. Let nothing prevent you from tur­
ning on your right flasher and exiting to the Campbellville Road.
You should then continue up the road for about seven miles, where­
upon you vlill reach the enterprise which is the chief activity of
the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Association. This activity
is the HALTON COUNTY RADIAL RAILWAY -since ~my 24,1971, the only
operating streetcar line in Canada -not counting, of course, the com­
mercial enterprise known as the Toronto Transportation Commission 1
When it is completed, the Halton County Radial Railway will
have more than 1.25 miles of electrified trackage -street or inter-

MEMBERS OF THE HALTON COUNTY RADIAL RAILWAY ARE HARD AT WORK INSTALLING
bracket arms for the overhead,using ex-Oshawa Railway line car number
45. Do not be misled -the pole is supposed to lean 10
0
away from the
track. Photo D.E.R.H.A. Halton County R.R.
Ex-Montreal & Southern Counties Number 107 -not yet regauged -stands
at i!assagaweya Junction in 1957,opposite Carhouse Number 1,then under
construction. Photo O.E.R.H.A. Halton County Radial Railway
CANADIAN
J08
R A I L
urban,whichever you prefer -with all the necessary appurtenances.It
is located on and will be built through an adequate property of some
38 acres. Two-thirds of the HCRRs main line is located on the for­
mer roadbed of the Guelph interurban portion of the Toronto Suburb­
an Railway of yesteryear,as previously stated. The main-line rail
laid to date is heavy enough, being 85 pour-ds to the yard. Barn and
yard trackage is slightly lighter. The main-line overhead thus far
erected is of catenary construction, suspended from pole brackets
and designed for either pantagraph or trolley-pole operation.
Power for the cars is presently s~pplied by a solid-state
rectifier with a capacity of about 200 hp.,housed in a concrete­
block substation. Within tvlO to three years, it is planned to supply
power in more lavish amounts to the catenary from a 500 kw. motor­
generator set, obtained from the Oshawa Electric Railway of Oshawa,
Ontario. The m-g set is installed but has not yet been placed on­
line(a pOvler company term for in operation). The electrical de­
partment of the HCRR has constructed a comprehensive dispatching –
communications telephone system along the more-than-mile-long
line.
It should be pointed out that since the emphasis at the
Halton County Radial Railway is on operation -rather than simple
preservation and display,the connotation museum has been omitted
intentionally from its name. Moreover,buildings on the site are
designed exclusively as storage structures. Carhouse Number 1 is
170 x 25 feet and provides covered, closed storage space for all but
four of the HCRRs cars. Carhouse Number 2 -presently under con­
struction -is a steel-framed building and will contain the remain­
ing vehicles.
Passenger terminal facilities are provided by
a
large station building, the former Canadian
National Railways station at RockvlOod,Ont. It
is a classic wooden railvlay station of Grand
Trunk Railway Company design, measuring some
30 x 60 feet and ,Ias purchased by the HCRR in
August,1971. It is scheduled for removal lias
is from its present location over the seven
miles intervening to the HCRR late in 1971.At
times things move fast for the HCRR. After
receiving title to the station in September, it
was necessary to remove the building from Can­
adian Nationals property within 90 days!
Plans call for the partial restoration of the
operators office,to serve as dispatching head­
quarters for the HCRR. The baggage room will
become a display area for small artifacts re­
lating to railwa.ys. The elaborate bronze and
plate-glass ticket windows, salvaged from the
Toronto Transportation Commissions old head­
office in downtown Toronto some fifteen years
ago will be installed.
CANADIAN
309
R A I L
There is also an essential concrete-block substation, two
storage buildings,a souvenir shop,a general utility building and
two
former garages -all of which have been erected for various but
vital purposes. Plans provide for the construction of a shop for
heavy repairs to equipment and a wood..,lOrking shop, as a necessary
adjunct to the repair facility.
From the list of equipment given at the end of this ar­
ticle,two things will be apparent. The preponderance of former Tor­
onto Transportation Commission equipment reflects the close and cor­
dial relationship ~ith that public transportation body. In addition
to facilitating the acquisition of many pieces of equipment, either
through donation or purchase at the lowest possible value, the TTC
has allowed the HCRR to carry out restoration work on cars Numbers
4000 and C-l at its Hillcrest Shops. Moreover,the TTC has stored
for considerable periods of time a number of cars, until the HCRR
could prepare a site for their reception.
The second obvious characteristic of the HORRs collect­
ion is the high proportion of non-passenger electric rail … ,ay cars.
The reason for this is quite logical. The HCRRs ri@1t-of-way is
accessible to road vehicles only at its two ends, … ,here the conces­
sion roads cross the former roadbed of the interurban line.All con­
struction on the HCRR must therefore be accomplished using rail ve­
hicles. The middle portion of the Halton County Radial Railway is
quite remote and the Management is determined to keep it that wayS
No motorcaders for thls line!
All of the vehicles on the HCRRs roster -except for
Rail Grinding Car Number H-25 (ex-TTC) which is used for materials
storage purposes -have either been rehabilitated or are presently
being restored -inside and outside and underneath! Particularly
extensive repairs have been carried out on Cars Numbers 55, 107 and
1326. Work on cars Numbers 2890, 4000 and C-l has been completed.
The latter two .,ere rehabilitated by the HCRR personnel at Hill­
crest Shops -by courtesy of the TTC -before being shipped to the
Halton County line at Rockwood. Other cars, such as Numbers 8,327 and
2424 were in good condition when they were received by the HCRR and
only regular maintenance work has been required to keep them that way.
Another aspect of the Halton County Radial Railway which
is different from most other street or interurban railways in North
America is its gauge. The line has been constructed to the unique
Toronto street Railway gauge of 4 feet 10 7/8 inches -close to 1.5
meters -and all of the standard (4 feet 8~ inches) gauge cars ac­
quired by the HCRR have been wide-gauged,except former Montreal and
Southern Counties Raih,ay car Number 107,which will be re-gauged
during the winter of 1972-73.
The 1971 season certainly … ,as a busy and eventful one.
Power ~,ent into the overhead for the first time on May 24,1971. It
was, despite what might be described politely as inclement weather,
a memorable 1eekend. Notwithstanding a late spring -two weeks be-

CANADIAN
314 R A I L
fore Easter,snow to a depth of ten feet remained on parts of the
main line -car motors were dried out with infrared heat lamps on
Saturday. The wire -0000 phosphor-bronze, grooved -went up that
afternoon. Early Sunday morning,Car Number 327 had a burned-out re­
sistor repaired and while this was being done, the catenary hangers
were being installed. By Sunday night, the latter job was completed
and cars NUmbers 327 and 2890 had been dried out, cleaned and in­
spected. Operation on Monday seemed certain.
The next morning -undismayed by a slight drizzle of rain
– a final inspection of the cars and overhead ,~as made. The feeders
and the lightning arrestors were installed. The drizzle became an
adolescent shower.
EXcitement increased. So did the rain.
In a posi ti ve downpour, a rail joint lIas repaired.
After a somewhat soggy lunch -and impelled by that sixth
sense peculiar to electric raihlaY enthusiasts – a crowd of some 75
people had gathered to watch the proceedings. president R.H. Johns
of the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Association announced
that the overhead would be energized at 1410 hours and that car Num­
ber 2890
l
s trolley pole would be placed in contact with the ener­
gized .lire at precisely 1415 hours.
Excitement again increased. So did the rain.
At l4l0,President Johns turned on the pOler!
At 1415, Car Number 2890 was filled to overflowing .lith
passengers. A test run was attempted. Nothing happened.
This result was puzzling until it was discovered that one
of the control fuses was blown.
More cautious attempts at operation Here made, again with
no results. This time,an inspection detected a faulty line-switch.
Anticlimax succeeded anticlimax. It was decided that the
repair of Car Number 2890s line-switch would take too long and so
President Johns ordered out open-bench Car Number 327 for the inaug­
ural run. He pointed out to the undaunted,enthusiastlc (wet) pas­
sengers that in all probability -and in view of the inclement wea-
~ Ex-TTC Car Number 327 and ex-TTC small Peter I~itt stand in front of
Carhouse Number 1 -as yet unwired. Photo Awful Kids O.E.R.H.A.
Ex-TTC Car Number 327 -an open-bench,4-wheel car -rattles through the
woods on the main line on the first day of operation -May 24,1971. The
motorman
is wearing a yellow raincoat owing to the torrential downpour.
Please note the excellent interurban catenary.Photo AWFUL KIDSOERHA •
On Opening Day the rain came down but the enthusiasts stuck it out,as
the First Oay Special backs up -with pole reversed -l~hich IJJas neces-
sary until the loop was built. Photo Junior Members H.C.R.R.
The line-uo in front of the carhouse: ex-Toronto Civic Railway Number 55,
ex-TTC Car Number 327,ex-TTC Number 2890 -the three cars currently in
operation at the Halton County Radial Railway. Photo Junior Members HeRR
CANADIAN
315
R A I L
ther -they would feel the damp more when they rode on Car Number
327s unprotected benches. Someone remarked that if the President
was waterproof enough to drive Car Number 327 from the front (expos­
ed) platform,the passengers were likewise waterproof enough to ride
it. And ,so the inaugural trip commenced.
In a matter of minutes, Car Number 327 was out on the main
line, the appropriate operating tests had been made and the inaugur­
al vehicle was ready to go. Seventeen years of blood,toil,tears and
sweat on the HCRRs Rockwood site,leading to this momentous occasion
would now be put to the ultimate test. Would all go well?
Amid sighs of relief,gasps of surprise and shouts of sa­
tisfaction,Car Number 327 moved cautiously up to Car Number 2890
in which some of the more perishable passengers had taken refuge
and the courageous participants were loaded. Car Number 327 then
moved off slowly and cautiously vlestbound to Pole Number 26, at
,hich point the trolley pole was reversed and the car ran back to
the carhouse to pick up the remainder of the invited guests and
other excited passengers.
About six trips vlere made up the line -in the pouring
rain -and, by 1700 hours, the first day celebrations vlere almost
at an end and the cars were safely housed in the carhouse.Afterwards
at a buffet supper held for the HCRR members, President Johns con­
gratulated them on their perseverance in the construction of their
very oVln operating electric railway,through. the attractive stretch
of second-growth timber on the property; the building of the con­
crete-block substation and the erection of the catenary. No less
courageous was the construction of the other facilities: the car­
houses, the garages and the auxiliary buildings. Finally,the Pres­
ident spoke of the financial support and physical exertion which
the members and supporters of the Halton County Radial Railway had
provided in the construction. Special praise was accorded the dozen-
and-a-half Rotten Kids -Junior Members of the OERHA -without
whose enthusiasm,urgency and support the project could not have been
completed well before the projected opening date. President Johns
reiterated that without the support of all of the members,the sl.;-c­
cess affirmed by the days events could not h~ve been achieved.
Car Number 2890 was inspected,repaired and was in oper­
ation the following weekend. Car Number 55 was placed in operation
in August,1971.
After this happy inaugural celebratlon, shaked own II and
training runs were made with four-wheeled cars on the 1,600 feet of
track that had been wired. While other cars were operational,the 80
hp. available allowed only Cars Numbers 327 and 55 to operate. Pas­
sengers were carried on most Sunday afternoons during the summer on
an informal basis (intermittent service: Sunday only). The minor
difficulties resulting from as much as 17 years of enforced idle­
ness were eliminated from the cars scheduled for operation in the
1972 season. The substation capaCity -initially only 80 hp. -was
increased. Tracklaying continued until the end of the 1971 season.

CANADIAN
;17
R A I L
There was,in fact, more track beyond the end of the wire than under
it. The erection of a further 1,800 feet of catenary was planned
for 1972.
As President Johns pointed out in his remarks, all of the
work at and on the Halton County Radial Railway is done by members,
on a
voluntary basis. No subsidies or grants -either municipal,Pro­
vincial or federal -have ever been requested or received and, in
addition to the voluntary work performed,essential financing has to
be found by HCRR and OERRA members.
Plans formulated for the 1972 season include
operation on the Halton County Radial Rail­
way from mid-May to mid-October, every Sunday
afternoon from 1330 to 1700 hours -weather
permitting. Cars will operate over about 0.67
miles of main line, from the parking lot at the
west end of the property, through the woods to
what is currently the main car storage
area at the east end.
A display of exhibits relating to the history of electric rail­
way transportation in eastern Canada will be organized in the former
baggage room of the Rockwood Station and visitors will be taken on
guided tours of the cars stored in Carhouse Number 1.
So,when you come zipping up double-divided Highway 401 from
Toronto next summer, SLOW DOWN -for safetys sake -and take Inter­
change 38 and the Campbellville Road. seven miles farther on,weather
permitting, you can ride on Canadas first operating electric subur­
ban street railway and relive what dedicated trolley fans refer to
(in tones husky with suppressed emotion) as The Good Old Days.
And the musical clang of the trolley gong will
resound through the forest at Rockwood on the
Halton county Radial Railway.
The author wishes to thank Mr. John Mills of the Ontario Electric
Railway Historical Association for the information and photographs
which made this article possible.
Putting the finishing touches on the lettering of ex-TTC Car Number 2890
at the Halton County Radial Railway. Photo Junior Members HCRR.
While the trucks of ex-London & Port Stanley Railways Car Number 8 were
at Hamilton,Ont.,being regauged,the body was brought to the H.C.R.R. and
put on blocks. The job was well done by Charles Matthews,who is a member
of the O.E.R.H.A. and the Halton County Radial Railway. Photo H.C.R.R.

.c:_::oo
__

__________
IIIii__
….
~
~
.
~
—..z:r__
.



___
__
–r_
.
rtD-=
HALTON
COUNTY
RADIAL
RAILWAY
Roster
of
Equipment.
Original number
Original company Type
Builder
Year
built
8
55 107
327
1326 2424
2890 4000
45
C-l
w-25
M-4 M-5 M-6 M-7
20
NOTES:
London
&
Port
Stanley
Railway
Toronto
Civic
RailwaY!TTC
Montreal
&
Southern
Counties
Ry.
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Oshawa
Raihlay
Steel
interurban
4-wheel,wood,city Wood
interurban
4-wheel,wood,open Hood,city
Peter
Ili
tt
,large
Peter
vii
tt
,
small
P.C.C.
Line
car
Jewett
Car Company,Newark,O.
Preston
Car
&
Coach
Co.,Preston
Ottawa
Car
&
Mnfg.Co.,Ottawa
Toronto
Transportation
Comm.
Toronto
Railway
Company
Can.car
&
Foundry
Company
Ottawa
Car
&
Mnfg.Co.,Ottawa
St.Louis
Car/Can.
Car &
Foundry
Niagara,st.Catharines
&
Toronto
Toronto
Railway
Company 1915
1915 1912
1933 1910
1921
19
2
3
1938
1925
1913
1912
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
Toronto
Transportation
COmmission
Lake
Erie
&
Northern
Railway
Canadian
Westinghouse
Company
Lake
Erie
&
Northern
Railway
Crane
car
Rail
grinder
Rail
bonder:
Trackmobile Gas
line-motor
Toronto
Railway
Company
Electric
Railway
Improvement
Whiting
Company
Ford
Motor Company Co.1915
(?
)
1934
(rebuilt
by
LE&NRy
1946)
New
York
central
Railroad
(CaSoRy)
Speeder
Fairmont
Kitchener
Public
utilities
Comm.
Bus,gas,27
psgr.
Ford
Motor Company
Canadian
National
Rail~ays
Irish
Mail
Sylvester
Canadian
National
Railways
Two
4-wheel
lorries
(unknown)
New
York
Central
Railroad
(CaSoRy)
4–lheel,
wood,
lorry
(unknovm)
Toronto
Transportation
Commission
4-wheel
tower
car
Toronto
Railway
Company
Halton
County
Radial
Railway
4-wheel
lorry
Halton
County
Radial
Railway
1.
Toronto
Transportation
Commission became
the
Toronto
Transit
Commission
in
1954;
2.
Car
Number
327,ex-TTpC,was
built
as
an
operating
replica
of
the
original
built
in
1893;
original
was
withdrawn
from
service
in
1915 and
scrapped
in
1924.
Original
owned and
operated
by
the
Toronto
Railway
Company. 1945
1947
(?
)
(?
)
(?
)
(?) (?)

r
,
liB 11t
Til rlu Plrs SOUIBID
S.S.Worthen
October 9 & 10, 1971, the
citizens of Cornwall,Ontar­
io and a multitude of vis­
itors from near and far en­
joyed a final opportunity
to ride on the electrified
Cornwall Street
Light and power
lines.
Railway,
Companys
Not
very far, to be sure.
But powered by electricity,
none the less.
The opportunity was not one
to be neglected.
The celebrations were appropriate to the occasion. All
the essential speeches were made; all the necessary remarks were
made. And the next day,the power was shut off forever.
And the diesel-electric switchers had won.
The
hotly-contested game was over.
But the visible flags flew and the inaudible trumpets
sounded for the long-gone streetcars and the remaining electric
locomotives.
Some mementos will be preserved – a former streetcar
in Cornwall and Locomotive Number 6 -perhaps -at
the Museum of Science and Technology at Ottawa. But
the days of freight trains with electric engines on
~vater Street have passed -quite definitely.
The follol>ling selection of photographs of CSR operation –
yesterday and today -is presented to commemorate this
regrettable but inevitable occasion.
~
In Th8 Good Old Days, Cornlolall Street RaihJBy, Li]ht & Pow8r Companys
Car Number 25 leaves the th8n-C.N.R. station at Cornwall Ontario in the
late afternoon of January 1C,1948. Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
Coming down Pitt Str8et,crossing Second Street,C.S.R.Car Number 28 clat­
ters through the intersection on October 19,1947. Number 2B was built by
the St. Louis Car Company in 1916 for the Jamestown CN.Y.)Street Railway
as Number 86 and was sold to Cornwall in 193B.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
~ Crane Car Number C-1,ex-TTC,moves majestically through the streets of
Acton,Ontario on June 5,196B, on the way to the Halton County Radial
Railway. Photo Helton County Radial Railway.

An unusual scene at the C.S.R.s !~ater Street Barns. Right to left: Car
Number
37,Locomotive Number 8,Cars Numbers 33 & 35. January 4,1948.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
Westbound on Second Street West,C.S.R. Car Number 27 passes the Howard
Smith Paper Mills.October 19,1947. Photo CRHA,E.A.Toohey Collection.
Car Number 25 of the C.S.R. stands at the corner of P~tt and Second St­
reet,while the motorman changes trolley poles. January 4,1948.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
On October 19,1947,C.S.R.Car Number ZO rumbles al~ng Cumberland Street.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
Switching the yards of the Howard Smith Paper Company on October 19,1947
is C.S.R.s electric Locomotive Number 10.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection~
One of the C.S.R.s efficient electric locomotives switches the tank
cars into the C.I.L.yard in Cormwall in February,197l.
Photo courtesy Cornwall STANDARD-FREEHOLDER.
CANADIAN
)27
R A I L
The C.S.R. s snow-fighting equipment consisted of three essential ele­
ments: An efficient sweeper,a powerful plow and an experienced motorman.
Photo courtesy Cornwall STANDARD-FREEHOLDER.
Mr. E~H.Heath of Cornwall,Ont.,sends the following selection of pictures
of the C.S.R. equipment,as it appeared towards the end of the summer of
1971,awaiting final disposition: The CSRs faithful line car,with its
invaluable hydraulic life platform;a single-truck sweeper,ideal for the
CSRs tight curves;Electric locomotive No.8 -probably one of the pair
purchased from the Lake Erie & Northern;another single-truck sweeper,the
newest one the CSR had;electric locomotive number 11,displaced by one of
CNs diesels;a double-cab wing-plow,once chiefly responsible for keeping
the CSRs tracks free from snow;freight motor number 12 was in service
towards the end of electric operation; last,but not least,CN unit 8019
with modified trucks to negotiate the streetcar curves which abound on
the CSRs former right-of-way.
CA NADI AN
328
R A I L
CANADIAN
=)29
R A I L
WIIILLS
Editorial Staff CAN ADIAN RAIL
PLAGUED BY SOME LEAKING BOILER TUBES
and sundry other signs of wear-and-tear,High Irons Berkshire,ex­
Nickel Plate Number 759 made a final trip from IIoboken,New Jersey
to Binghamton,New York and return on August 14-15 last. Northbound
via the old Erie Railroad main line,over the summit at Calicoon, No.
759 panted through Port Jervis, N.Y. with 900-plus enthusiasts. Next
days return to Hoboken,via the former Delaware,LackalTanna & Vlestern
Railroad, visited the city of Scranton, Pa. It las a memorable two-day
trip.
The return of Number 759 to STEAMTOVIN U.S.A. at Riverside,
Vermont – a suburb of Bellows Falls -began tlle follo She
-lorked back to Binghamton, via Scranton on the one-time Route of
the Phoebe Snow on August 17 a.nd stayed overnight in the former
city. Next day at 0830 hrs.,she began the trip north over the old
Albany & Susquehanna -nO1 the Delaware & Hudson -to l.johawk Yard,
near Schenectady,with Marvin Davis -D&ris Road Foreman of Engines­
at the throttle. She had about 1,000 tons of revenue freight on her
drawbar -just enough tonnage to provide the braking power neces­
sary to save her brakeshoes on the descent of Richmondville Hill.
CANADIAN
JJl
R A I L
After spending the night at Mohawk Yard, Number 759 left
on vednesday at 00)0 hrs. with northbour.d tor.nage for Hhitehall,N.Y.
and the D&Hs branch to Rutland,Vermont and the rails of the Greer.
t-1ountatn
Railroad. Number 759 handled the regular train from Hhite­
hall to Rutland,with tonnage for interchange at the latter city with
the Vermont Railway and the Green rlountain Railroad.
From Rutland to Riverside,Green Nountain Railroads Clyde
Sessions .Ias at the throttle, Presumably, Number 759 negotiated the
famous
bridge over Mill River at Cuttingsville safely ar.d, at this
writing,is back again or. display at STEAl,1TOltlN U.S.A.(J.SilauglJr.essy)
E.FFECTlVE JULy 10, 197l, ALL OF CP RAILS PAS­
senger services betlieer. Montreal and Q,uebec
City Here changed to RDC DAYLINER equipment.
Nondays to Thursdays, one RDC-1 No. 9053
on one
trair. and No. 9055 on the other – VlaS
used. On weekends,RDC-1 NQ. 9056 and RDC-2
No. 9196 are used as second cars for tbese
trains, RDC-1s have been fitted …,ith re-
clining seats, surplus from passenger cars
2242,2263,2267,2280,2286,2288 and 2296, now
in Angus Shops,Ivlontreal.
RDC-2 No. 9196, whi Cll !lad one end damaged in
an accident, was repaired wi tll the remains of
No. 9198,now retired (I). No. 919[-] 1TaS se­
verely damaged in an accident near Calgary,
Alta.,in the winter of 1970. (Roger Boisvert)
A FURTHER CHAPTER HAS BEEN HIUTTEN
in the mysterious meanderings of the Flying Scotsman -wi til tVlO
tenders -until recently resident on various portions of Canadian
National Railways property in Toronto. On August 14 last,in a very
effective cloak of secrecy, Flying Scotsman and train left Toronto
and passed into the United states, through the Niagara Falls-Suspen­
sion Bridge gateway, apparently bound for Buffa10,N.Y.,Iihere it was
said the train would be refurbished for subsequent exhibition.Rumor
has it that Flying Scotsman and train are headed for At1anta,Geor­
gia and the comparative safety of tl1e Southern Railway,with the pos­
sibilityof a transcontinental trek, later in tbe year,to Fishermans
o1l1arf,San Francisco,to participate in British Trade Week celebrations.
Another visit to Canada has been suggested -this time in 19-(3 -for
the purpose of participating in the Tricentennia1 Celebrations at
Kingston,Ontario.It is hoped that the intervening exhibitions will
be suffiCiently profitable to permit a return to Canada ithout any
strings attached. (S.S.Worthen.)
ALGOMA CENTRAL RAIL~AY RECENTLY PURCHASED
CP RAIL passenger cars nos. 2244,2254 and 2265,
for use on the Agawa Canyon Express service,
between Sault ste-I-iarie,Or.tario and Hearst,Ont.
Algoma Central did not have time to repaint and
renumber the coaches before placing them in re-
CANADIAN
332
R A I L
venue service. The consist of this train is nor­
mally 4 diesel units on the head-end, 1 steam­
heater car,3 baggage cars,12 coaches and two
diners -not a bad load for one of Canadas les.
ser railwaysl (Roger Boisvert.)
CANADIAN NATIONALS LATEST UNIT-TRAIN CAPER
will not haul coal,but yellow slated sulphur,from Kaybob,Alberta-
175 miles northwest of Edmonton -to Vancouver Hharves,North Vancou­
ver,B.C. This move is scheduled for once-a-week operation.
(CN KEEPING TRACK.)
CP RAlLIS E-8
Is,NillfBERS 1800
AND 1802,
formerly used in passenger service between f-ion­
tr6al and Quebec City,have been transferred to
Montreal-Saint John,N.B. runs on Trains 41 &
42. (Roge r Boi svert. )
MODIFIED-DESIGN TRILEVEL Aurm-10BlLE CARRIERS -,
150
of them lotth(the usual) $ 5 million,have been ordered by Can­
adian National Raihlays from National Steel Car Corporation of Ham­
ilton,Ontario. CN car-design engineers and representatives of the
automotive industry thougllt them up. They .rill be 89 feet 4 inches
long and will weigh 70 tons. Delivery starts in November,1971 and
ends in February, 1972. (CN KEEPING TRACK.)
SPENDING SEVERAL DAYS IN MID-A UG USI
train-watching and photographing on the Hhite
Pass & Yukon Route, Ken Goslett ,{rites that the
VlP&YR are seriously considering a 115-mile ex­
tension north from the main line to Carmacks,
to reduce the road-haul distance for the ore
coming out of the Anvil Mine at Faro. On the
road between Carmacks and ~fuitehorse, Yukon,
there is sometimes a truck every 15 minutes •
A
railroad extension would be more economical
in the long run, but the capital cost would be
conSiderable.
THROUGH SERVICE FOR PASSENGERS BETWEEN MONTREAL AND CHICAGO
has been resumed by Canadian National Raihlays, in conjuncioion with
AMTRAK, albeit by a somewhat devious route. Passengers journeying to
Chicago by rail ride CN I s RAPIDO service from llontreal to Toronto
and TEMPO service from Toronto to vlindsor, Ontario. From (CN I s )~lind­
sor Station,passengers are bussed to mid-town Detroit to a con­
nection with AMTRAK service to Chicago. Through ticketing from Mon­
treal to Chicago is once again possible. (CN KEEPING TRACK.)
EAGLE-EYED l-iEMBER JOHN D. HELSH REPORTS
that ESSO Touring Centre IS map of the City of
Ottawa -Canada I s Capital -dated 1971, ShOIS
a rail-..ray line not far from the Queensway ,
identified with the initials N.Y.C.. Honder
CANADIAN
JJJ
R A I L
what they could stand for?
North York Central II -perhaps ??
THE MOST ENCOURAGING STAT~1ENT FOR 1971
for the long-suffering raihray passenger was made recently in CNs
KEEPING TRACK, Affirming that the passenger train is far from dead,
CNs General I,Ianager, Passenger Sales and Services Alex Olynyk poir::­
ted out that significant progress was being made in the plan to re­
store international passenger train services, to improve existing pa­
ssenger equipment and to develope new passenger transportation modes,
He noted a recent statemer::t by CN s Presider::t 11r, N.J ,MacMillan that
CN is still negotiating with Ur::ited Aircraft of Canada about putting
ar:: improved TURBO back into service and highlighted the Companys
participation in tbe LRC (Light,Rapid,Comfortable) equipment being
designed and built ir:: conjunction ~1th ALCAN and MLVI Industries.
The encouraging remark ~/as Mr. Olynyks summation: I, by God, am
r::ot
running ar::.y Toonerville Trolley! II
THE HEEK OF AUGUST 2,1971jHAS TIIE OCCASION
in Cobalt, Ontario of tile Second Mir::.ers Festival –
dedicated to the proposition that silver mining
is more attractive than gold mining. Special ever::.ts
and prospector-style meals ~rere enjoyed, but the
highlight of the occasion was the appearance of On­
tario Northland Railvray s Centennial (1967) Train,
fresh. from its resounding success in a starrir::g role
at Kapuskasings Semicentennial celebrations. press
reports estimated tlle cro1 passengers at more than 1,000 -all of lIhom enjoyed
the round trip from Cobalt to nearby Bass Lake via
(of course) the Ontario Northland Railway.
ONE IMPORTAHl DECISION vlHICH GOVERNOR NELSON ROCKEFELU,R
of the state of Ne.r York will have to make before long, is Hhether or
not th.e State ·,ill compensate
ll
ANTRAl: for tile operatior:: of Delarare
& Hudsons passer::~er service fro~ Albany to the Interr::ational Border
near Rouses POint,N.Y. tilereby prolor::ging the life of tIle PA-ls –
dear to the J:leart of Jim Sbaughnessy and many, mar::y otl;ers. Tile Gov­
ernment of Canada !las already ir.dicated that tlje DMl can expect to
receive financial assistar.ce for the rematr::.ir::g distance to 110ntreal
~Then tIle service is resum.ed. The next question cor.cerr::.s -Thich ter­
mir::al ir:: J:1or::.treal tile Dld[ V/ill use -!.-Tindsor Statior:: ofCP RAIL or
Central Station of CNR. The argument goes like thiS: Hher. Car::adiar::.
P
a.cific was operating tl..,renty or thirty passenger trair::s in and out
of Hindsor Statlor::. daily, D&JI paid terminal charges in proportion to
the number of trair.s (cars) it operated against the total r.umber of
trains (carsJ operated in total. Uncomplicated matbematics suggest
that ,ith CP RAIL passenger tralns getting fe.-rer and fe
er,D&Hs
share is getting larger ar:d larger. Tile answer to the Iligb cost of
living for tl,e D&H may ,~ell be to go /ilere the action is -ar.d that
is CN I S Central Station. Tllis could be a reversior::. to tile status quo
ante, since when D&H came to Hontreal first, the stopping place ~as
Grand Trunk Railways Bonaventure Station,later CNs terminal.
CANADIAN
334
R A I L
RECENTLY, McCLELLAND & STEV/ART, TORONTO PUBLISHERS,
announced that Volume 2 of Pierre Burtons history of the Canadian
Pacific -The Last Spike -would be released on or about Septem­
ber 13,1971. This caused cor.siderab1e conjecture about the success
of Volwre 1 -The National Dream. Said to require a 60,000-copy
sale to make it worth Jack & pierres whi1e,it appears that its
election to the Book of the Month Club list may have guaranteed its
success. The Last Spike is advertised as having a first printing
of 75,000 copies -25,000 more than the first run of Volume I.
Meanwhi1e,Vo1ume III of Colonel G.R.Stevenshistory of the Canadian
National Railways -Sixty Years of Trial and Error -covering the
period 1923 to 1970,has been ready for publication for some time, but
because of an agreement betl1een the Colonel and CN,when the whole
work was
undertaken,it cannot be published for another ten or more
years -in Canada, that is. This agreement did not extend to pub­
lication in other countries, which gives substance to the rumor that
Volumes I & II will be combined with unpublished Volume III for
production in a single volume -replete with illustrations -by Mac­
Millan & Company of New York in the spring of 1912.
THE 1J10ST INDECENT REMARK HADE SO FAR IN 1971 –
tatamount to heretical to many -was the recent
suggestion of CNs Atlantic Region V-P D. W.
B1air,who had the courage to say that CN would
like to standard-gauge the Newfie narrotl-gauge
if any proposal which would make it financial­
ly possible could be found. At the same time,
~tr. Blair reassured the members of the Net~ound­
land and Labrador Chamber of Commerce, meeting at
Grand Falls,Nf1d.,that CN Has NOT about to ter­
minate rail service on the Island. He opined as
hotl Nel~ound1and would need its railvlay for a
good many
years to come. So it looks like the
Netrfie narrovl-gauge will continue to fulfill its
important role in the Islands transportation
picture and lhi1e narrow-gauge afficionados may
not be able to ride it from end to end, there is
ahlays the possibility that they can get a lit­
tle of the action, somelhere along the line.
vlORK ON THE EASIHARD EXfENSION TO iHE CITY I S CENTRE
of Montreals spagetti-dish of expressways has required considerable
construction near Hountain & st. Antoine Streets, necessitating the
closing of Tracks r( to 11 inclusive of CP RAILs Hindsor Station.
Apparently the closure is not exactly temporary, since the rails
of these five tracks have been removed. At the same time,construct­
ion wor!. has begun on the former site of the Provincial Transport
bus terminal on Dorchester Boulevard at Stanley Street – a site
forming part of the total area to be developed by Marathon Realties,
pessimists (realists) are putting this and that together and are
concluding that the days of lindsor Station are indeed numbered.
CANADIAN
335
R A I L
MOST HORNINGS OF THE YEAR,CANADIAN NATIONALS
Train 51 -the Lal{esll0re -rumbles out of
Central Station,Montreal at 0830 hours -10
minutes after its 1-1igh-speed sister, Train 61
the Rapido, bOttl westbour.d for Toror.to. I10st
mornir.gs,Train 51 gets a yellml board at the
top of 40th. Avenue,Lachir.e and a red block
at the 55th. Avenue llighlaY underpass, 1,,11e
Train 61 loads passengers at Dorval Station,
about a mile up tile line. August 4,19(1 was
no different in this respect. Engineer !·lax
Basset and Helper Jean St-Germair. found tile
difference when Train 51 eased to a stop at
the 50th. Avenue signal ar.d tlley sal five odd
figures running along ti,e track-side. Second s
later a quintette of rubber-faced bandits,ar­
med witll a variety of submachine guns,subdued
them and the baggage man. A frantic and frer.­
zied search of the mail bags ensued, 1>1i til no
apparent result. Spitting curses ar.d threats,
the bandits fled ir. a car previously cached
in a thicket of trackside trees. r.1ax, Jean and
the baggage man pulled themselves together ar.d
after an ilour s investigation, were alloled to
take Train 51 west to Brocl{ville, arri vj.r.g at
that place -as one Montreal paper put it
only 80 mir.utes late. A CN spokesman and a
post office authority denied that a rumored
shipment of $ 50,000 .as in the baggage car.
The desperados Ilere not available for commer.t.
IN
AN AUGUST 3RD.,l971 EDITORIAL,TORONTOS GLOBE AND HAIL
vTaxed highly indignant about the shroud of secrecy Wllich -it claims-
descends over every accider.t that occurs on a Canadian railvTay. A
Dc-8 crashes -there is ar. immediate ar.d detailed goverr.ment ir.quiry.
A cruise ship catches fire -even if it is of foreii91 registrY,there
ia an inunediate hullabaloo,complete with allegations and inferences.
The Globe & Hail feels that the statutes of Canada should be re-
vised to permit raihmy aCCidents to be subject to tlle same scru-
tiny. As things stand now,the Car.adian Transport Commission does
the investigating out does not make its findir.gs public. Regardless
of the average citizens need to lmow,tl1e Globe and Mailstates:
If there ,as ever a time ,.,rhen railways merited the trappings of
privilege (to keep the findir.gs of every raihmy accident secret •• Ed.)
it is no longer with us today. It is unwarranted,unjust and unsafe
to place the railroads beyond the laws the rest of us must live by.
Besides,it is robbing the Globe and Mail of some first-class gory
headline material. Alas,poor RochdaleJ
~
Toronto Transit Commissions Car Number 2958 (motor) and Trailer Number
3013
rumble west on Front Street in Toronto on July 17,1946,pasGing in
front of the Union Station. Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
FROM THE
ASSOCIATION S
ARCHIVES
CANADIAN RAIL
published by t-he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION ~~~,~~,~2Qu~toon 8
AssoCiat-e Membership including II issues of
Canadian Rail 8.00 annually.
EDITOR S.S. VVort-hen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A. Kemp
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beat-t-y & F.F.Angus
VISIT THE
Canadian Railway JlIlISCllltl
~v
Ll._.
VISITEZ LE
Jlillsee Fe …. oviaile Canadien
OPEN MAY SEPT. OUVERT MAl -SEPT.
Our 10th. Anniversary Notre 10em_ Annlversaire.
DIRECTOR OF BRANCHES
c. ,~. K. Heard. 74 Sou thern Drl ve I ottawa i. Canada
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP SERVICES J.A.BEATTY
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA rJ.R.Linley. Secty •• P.O.Box 141. TerLlilm1.l A, Ottawa.
ROCKY lIOUNTAIN Mr.Donald W.Scafe 12407 Lansdowne Drive, Apt .. 101 Edmonton.
PACIFIC COAST ~lr ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAio,lA VALLEY
SASKATCHEi-lAN
PACIFIC COAST
FAR CAST
BRITISH ISLES
1;flNITOBA
ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. J,67 Somerset St, …. ! •• Ottuwa. Ontarlo.
J.S.Nicholoson. 2)06 Arnold St •• Saskq,toon, SBskatcI1eN&n.
Peler Cox, 609 Cottonwood Ave., Coquitlam, British Columbia.
W.D.IlcKeoWTI, 6-7, 4–chome. Yamate-cho,Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
J.H.Sanders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Beds., England.
K.G.Young-er, 267 Vernon Road, Winnipeg, I·:anitoba.
~ir. Donald W.Scafe,i2407 Lansdowne Drive, Apt. 101, Edmonton Alta.
Copyright 1971 Printed in Canado. on C.9.nadian Paper

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