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Canadian Rail 231 1971

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Canadian Rail 231 1971

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1VO.231
.A.PFl.XL 1971

CANADAS CLASSIC INTERURBANS
THE 130 CLASS CARS
·IAGARA ST. CATHERINES
RAILVVAY
M.P.Murphy
Sketch courtesy Rl. Sanduski
OF THE
& TORONTO
Unlike the cars on the electric interurban lines
of Canadas neighbour to the south, wooden
arch-windowed trolleys of the classic
design were a rarity in Canada in the
high summer of the interurban era. Not­
withstanding this fact, the Preston Car &
Coach Company of Preston, Ontario, did turn
out six such cars in 1914 for the Niagara,
st. Catherines and Toronto Railway and
this brief history is intended to chron­
icle the story of these unusual cars.
The Niagara,st. Catherines and Toronto Railway was one of
the largest and most successful of all of Canadas interurban elec­
tric railroads. It is also very well-remembered by most North Amer­
ican trolley enthusiasts. It is remarkable that this line provided
both the first and the last inter-city electric interurban service
in Canada,having instituted service between st. Catherines and Thor-
.:..:..:..:..:-X.
CROSSING THE ANCIENT SWING-BRIDGE OVER THE OLD WELLAND CANAL,NIAGARA,St.
Catherines & Toronto Railways classic 130,complete with the CN wafer,
decorates this months cover. On June 20,1948,the date of the picture,
130 has just left the main line and is now on the WeIland SubdiviSion,
heading for Port Colborne. Photo courtesy W. Bailey.
PRESTON-BUILT NO. 134,AIR COMPRESSOR CHUGGING, WAITS FOR THE HIGHBALL FOR
a northbound run to St. Catherines from Bridge Street Terminal in Niagara
Falls,Ontario,in April,1943. 134s air whistle is tucked in behind the
rear-end red flag. Photo courtesy W. Bailey •

CANADIAN R A I L
)ld,Ontario,in September,1887. The last inter-city service was that
from Thorold to Port Colborne,which was discontinued in March,1959,
)y which time other comparable services had entirely disappeared fr­
)m the Canadian transportation scene.
Moreover,the N.S.& T. had the distinction of being the oper­
ltor of Canadas only international trolley service, from Niagara
ralls,New York to Port Dalhousie,Ontario. From the latter city on
Lake
Ontario, connections were made with steamboats for the onward
journey to Toronto,across Lake Ontario.
A very cursory examination of a map of this region shows the
1ensity of population which encouraged the incorporators of urban
lnd interurban electric lines. It could be said to be a matter of
Logic that the City of st. Catherines would be joined eventually to
rhorold,Welland,Port Colborne and Niagara Falls -as well as to
)ther towns in the Niagara Peninsula -by electric railways.
THE NEW CARS.
Following the construction and electrification of the var-
tous lines which made up the N.S.& T.s system -including the
~arlier streetcar lines which were integrated therein -the emphasis
~as placed on rolling stock. Interurban electric car technology had
10W advanced to the point where large cars, capable of being oper­
~ted in one or two-car trains, could be built. These larger cars
provided the most elegant and most comfortable mode of transporta­
~ion for the public, while at the same time making possible attract­
Lve economical operation. This in-train operation -that is to
say, several cars operating as one train -reduced operating problems
8specially on single-track lines. More people could be moved at a
lower cost and with fewer operating problems, when electric inter­
urban cars were operated in multiple-unit trains.
When these advantages became evident, the Niagara,St. Cath­
erines and Toronto Railway ordered six wooden multiple-unit cars
from the Preston Car and Coach Company of nearby Preston,Ontario .
rhe six units were delivered in 1914 and were,at the time,the only
cars on the line capable of operation in multiple or in-train.
These units were particularly interesting because of the
arch-windows and because they were wood-sheathed interurbans -ra­
ther unusual in Canada. There were,of course, other examples. Those
which
might be recalled include the preston-built trailers for the
London and Port Stanley Railway,as well as certain cars of United
states manufacture which operated on the British Columbia Electric
.:..: .. :..: .. : .. : .. :.
N.S.& T. CAR 134,WITH TROLLEY POLE DOWN,TAKES A REST IN THE ST. CATHERINES,
Onto yards on May 5,1946. Snowplow-type pilots and electric marker-lights
were common on trolleys in Ontario. Photo courtesy W. Bailey.
THE END OF THE LINE I PORT COLBORNE,ONTARIO,IHTH A RAILFAN SPECIAL OF CARS
134 & 135 approaching the adjacent road crossing,on July 2B,l940.Even the
wig-wag grade-crossing signals have now disappeared.
Photo courtesy S.D.maguire.
CANADIAN
99
R A I L
Railway. There were also other preston-built arch-window cars run­
ning on the complex of electric interurban lines in the Grand
River valley,in the central part of the southern Ontario peninsula.
An item in THE CANADIAN RAILWAY AND MARINE WORLD of Feb-
ruary,1915,indicated that the order for these new cars had been
completed and delivered:
The Niagara,St. Catherines and Toronto Railway has re­
ceived six 55t foot semi-steel cars for its interurban
service. They are steel underframed, wi th -sheathed
steel sides. Seating capacity is 67 persons and the
weight of each car is about 75,000 lbs. The cars are
designed for operation in two-car trains, for which pur­
pose the front car has,in addition to the main and
smoking compartments common to both classes of cars, a
baggage section. The leading car has high-backed seats
with head roll upholstered in green.leather and the
rear car is upholstered in plush. The cars are finish­
ed in polished quarter-cut oak, inlaid with white holly,
in a mission finish,agasote head linings and empire dec-
ks,all carried on the steel framing. The trimmings
throughout are statuary bronze. Special attention has
been given to the lighting and ventilation. They are
also equipped with the latest type of forced-draught el­
ectric heaters, 11 th thermostat control. They are also
equipped with electric markers and classification lamps.
Electrically,they consist of four GE 219, 75 hp. motors,
·11 th M.K. multiple -uni t control with dead -man re lease.
vestinghouse A.M .M. train control, air brakes and Tom­
linson radial automatic couplers complete the outfit.
These were classic cars indeed, originally painted steel-grey
with black and gold lettering. The interiors were elegantly var­
nished,with stained upper-sash arch-windows and large lower -sash
picture-windows.
During the early years of their service on the N.S.& T.,the­
se cars were undoubtedly the backbone of the service on the system,
but as other larger,more modern cars became available from other
lines, the 130
1
s were slowly but surely displaced and phased out of
regular service, being relegated to standby or extra train situa­
tions. In later years, the 130
1
s did see considerable service in
special train moves or in substitute service ~hen other cars were
being repaired.
The Peak Years.
The heyday of the 130-class cars occurred at the same
as the railway itself enjoyed its greatest popularity. From
time that they were delivered in 1914,passenger traffic on the
& T. increased steadily through to 1921,which was the line
1
s
year. That year,the N.S.& T. carried some 8,365,000 passengers
its approximately 75 miles of track. The largest part of the
time
the
N.S.
peak
over
bus-
HE MOTORMAN WAITS PATIENTLY AS THE PASSENGERS BOARD A FIVE-CAR TRAIN OF
3D-class cars at Niagara Falls,ontario in July of 1943. The 130s may be
lone
but the midis are st i 11 around I Photo court esy W. Ba iley •
. ness laS over the line from Port Dalhousie to st. Catherines and
~iagara Falls,logically from the boat connection from Toronto across
;he lake.
It was on this main line operation that the multiple-unit
;rains were used to their greatest advantage and although the de­
;cription had said that they 1lere to be used in t1lo-car trains,fre­
[uently there Iere more cars in the train than that I
After 1921,passenger traffic began to decline little by lit­
;le,partly because of the growing competition from the jitney and
Jrimitive autobus and partly because of the increasing use of the
.amily automobile. The N.S.& T. was therefore obliged to modernize
.ts services in order to make them more attractive to the traveller.
Because so much of the N.S.& T.s other-than-commuter traf­
ric 1las to the popular holiday and sightseeing city of Niagara
?alls,Ontario,in 1928 the Company built and opened the spanking new
T01ler Inn Terminal at that place. This was designed to be and
Very likely was the most beautiful interurban electric railway ter­
ninal in Canada. It VIas an imposing structure, built of multicoloured
stone and resembling in a general ~ay an English country inn. There
~ere three terminal tracks (nos. 1-3) for services to Niagara Falls
only. Track 4 was a through track for connecting services to Nia­
gara Falls,New York. The terminal building also boasted an obser­
vation tower from which a superb view of the Horseshoe and Amer­
ican Falls at Niagara could be enjoyed. In addition to this new and
imposing terminal building, the N.S.& T. made costly improvements in
the right-of-way and approaches, to reduce the running time through
the elimination of much of the street-running in the city.
Over the River.
In the follovdng year (1929),the Niagara,St. Catherines and
roronto concluded an agreement lith the International Railway Com­
pany of Niagara Falls,New York, whereby cars from the Canadian line
CANADIAN
101
R A I L
could operate over the latter Companys tracks across the Falls View
Bridge to Niagara Falls,N.Y. At this city, connections could be made
with the International Railways high-speed interurban electric tr­
ains to Buffalo and from there to other cities in northwestern New
York state.
The Tower Inn Terminal was adjacent to the Canadian approa­
ches to the Falls View Bridge and it was for this reason that Track
4 in the terminal had been constructed as a through track. The
through interurban electric trains from Port Dalhousie and st. Cath­
erines lould stop at the Tower Inn Terminal to detrain passengers ,
and would then continue on across the Falls View Bridge to the Uni­
ted states. As the view of the mighty Falls of Niagara from the
spacious windows of the 130-series cars was quite spectacular, the
local traffic ,~ould have been tremendous had it not been for the
fact that no local passengers were carried in either direction! The
through interurban trains carried only those passengers who were
ticketed to points beyond the twin cities of Niagara Falls, in both
directions.
The Decline of the Service.
Unfortunately, this excellent operation had no sooner been
inaugurated than it was forced to be cancelled. Weight restrictions
had to be imposed on vehicles crossing the Falls View Bridge and
the electric cars ,~ere the first affected. The 130
1
s were replaced
at once with the less heavy 60-class cars. As the Falls View Bridge
continued to deteriorate, additional restrictions ,,,ere added and on
July 6,1932,electric railway service was suspended altogether and
a
bus shuttle-service across the bridge was substituted. Now all
CAR 132 WAS STEEL-SHEATHED EARLY IN ITS CAREER AND IS SHOWN HERE IN A
train with number 130. The destination sign Niagara Falls New York is
interesting. Photo courtesy W. Bailey.
,-.
~. . .,.
I;;~ ~f1
, I -, . .,~.:
,(, .
. :-. ~

CANADIAN
103
R A I L
the N .S.& T.s trains terminated at the Tm1er Inn Terminal in Nia­
gara Falls,Ont.
Nevertheless,for four short years the N.S.& T. could boast
that it ran an international trolley service, but for most of this
period, the 130s were unable to make this run because of their
weight.
The Falls View Bridge,famous throughout North America and
Europe,was not destined to stand much longer. Every spring its piers
were exposed to recurring damage from the ice-flows which ground
their way do~m the Gorge. On January 27, 1938, in the midst of one of
Canadas severe winters, the bridge foundations. were displaced by
the ice and the Falls View Bridge collapsed into the Niagara River
Gorge. It vias a spectacular and memorable disaster. The collapse of
the bridge ended the bus phuttle-service once and for all, but it
also contributed significantly to the decline of the interurban el­
ectric service to Niagara Falls. Vlith the loss of the bridge, the
Tower Inn Terminal 1aS very badly situated to handle traffic to and
.: .. : … : … : … : .. : .. :.
CAN~DAS ONLY INTERNATIONAL TROLLEY CONNECTION WAS PROVIDED BY THE NIAGARA,
St. Catherines & Toronto Railway,between 1929 and 1932. During most of this
period,the 130-series were not in the international service because of the
weight restrictions on the Falls View Bridge over the Niagara Gorge. By
July 3,1933~when this photograph was taken, travellers were bussed over
the bridge to board the International Railway Companys high-speed cars
for Buffalo andother points in northern New York State. The picture shows
I.R.C.s heavy centre-entrance car no. 2006 for the Niagara Falls,N.Y.
Buffalo,N.Y. High Speed Line,loading in Niagara Falls,N.Y. In the period
mentioned, the N.S.& T. shared this terminal. Photo courtesy S.D. Maguire.
THE CLASSIC INTERURBAN CAR INTERIOR. THE LAYOUT OF THE 130-CLASS CARS
was peculiar, with the unusual baggage compartment arrangement,which left
a passage-way to the motormans cab. Photo courtesy W. Bailey.
~
2..

co.
.0.
10
:.2
4
14
Ie
2.0
EEEEEMlEEEEEMlEEEEEBFIwwlEEEEEBFIwwlEEEEEMlEEEEEBFIEEEEEBFI;
NIAGARA.
ST.
CATHARINES
E,
TORONTO
RAILVVAY
CO.
No
.
130
BLT.
PR.ESTON
IQI4
DE.c
. 2.3. 195.3
R.
J.
5ANDU5K.Y
Plan
courtesy
R.J.Sandusk1
NIAGARA,ST. CATHERINES AND TORONTO RAILWAYS CARS NOS. 135 & 130 IN A
train at Niagara Falls,Ontario,in the late 40s. These cars were built
by the Preston Car & CoaCh Company in 1914.
N.S. &. T. CAR NUMBER 132,IN THE MODERN COLOUR SCHEr~E OF RED .o.ND CREAM,
photographed at St. Catherines,Ontario on July 28,1940.
Photos courtesy S.D.Maguire •
. : .. : .. : .. : .. : .. : .. :.
from Niagara Falls,New York,as the alternate crossing of the Gorge
1las some distance domstream. This beautiful terminal was closed on
September 27, 19!~0 and subsequently demolished.
Passenger traffic on the N.S.& T.s Niagara Falls line de-
clined to such an extent that in 1940,all main line service ,laS
suspended. Shortly thereafter, several of the 130-class cars were
put out to pasture in bad repair and their heyday was over .The N.
S.& T. had made very considerable expenditures for equipment and
track-·joTork in the hope of increasing its passenger traffic. Unfor­
tunately,the increased traffic which would have justified these ex­
penses never materialized.
All of these remarkable 130s were scrapped -some soorier,
some later. One of them, No. 13D,was rebuilt and modernized -if
indeed the result could be so described -in 1947. However, it too
was retired in 1954. Many electric interurban railway enthusiasts
hoped that it could be preserved, but damage during transport and
subsequent outside storage caused it to deteriorate to such an ex­
tent that it soon llas beyond repair. Thus the last of these beauti­
ful cars passed from the Canadian Interurban electric railway scene. (

CANADIAN
107
R A I L
The 130-Series
of the
Niagara, st. Catherines and Toronto RaihlaY Company.
All of these cars lere built by the Preston Car and
Coach
Company,preston,Ontario,in 1914.
Number. Information.
130 Interurban coach;rebui1t and modernized in 1947 to a
one-man
car with 4 doors;painted red and cream;retir­
ed in 1954; later it laS shipped to RAIL CITY MUSEUM,
Sandy Pond,N.Y.,the roof being badly damaged in tran­
sit; after sitting outside for several years, it is
nOli believed to have b,een scrapped.
131
1
32
133
134
135
Interurban coach; scrapped in 1949.
Interurban combine;rebuilt as a one-man steel-sheath­
ed car and finally scrapped in 1949.
Interurban combinejretired in 1935;scrapped in 1942.
Interurban combine;scrapped in 1950 after a long re­
tirement.
Interurban coach; originally numbered 129 prior
1920;scrapped in 1949.
Basic Dimensions.
Overall length
Overall height
Body width
Height (approx)
Seating capacity
55 feet 6 inches
13 feet
10 feet
75,000 lbs.
67 persons.
Sources of Information.
Canadian Railliay and Marine torld February, 1915.
The Intercity Electric Railway in Canada Due,1965.
The Niagara,St. Catherines & Toronto Railway Mills,J.M.,1967.
Trains Magazine, October 1957 Issue •
. : .. : .. : .. : .. : .. : .. :.
to
THE 130-SERIES CARS,LIKE ALL OTHER GOOD THINGS,HAD TO COME TO AN ENOl
Car 135 -mounted on a flat car -leaves her native land for the Can­
adian National scrap-yard at London,Ontario, a sad but all-to-common
fate for electric interurban cars. Photo courtesy W. Bailey.
.All
HAPPY EVER AFTER
S.S.Horthen
good, pure and happy stories,we are told,
invariably begin with the 1wrds Once
upon a t ime ••••••••• If •
Io[ell, here we go 1
ONCE UPON A T~~ (Not so very long ago),
in a country (not so very far a1ay) there
lived a man and 1ife Vlho had two, small,
little-girl Alsatian (German Shepherd) puppies
and a house-trailer.
There was also a street-car museum.
The man and >ife expected to become caretakers
of the street-car museum and the two little-girl
doggies expected to become street-car museum
watchdogs, class I.
However,neitl1er of these two things happened.
~he members of the street-car museum named the two little-girl dog­
(ies Pantagraph and Trolley. These names v{ere not particularly
Tell-suited and so they were changed by the Fairy Godmother to Mor-
19a
1l
and Bidwell ,after two electric interurbar. .cailway parlor cars
)f yesteryear.
Nmv 1hen the husband and llife found that they
could not become street-car museum caretakers,
they decided to donate the two little-girl dog­
gies to the street-car museum ill appreciation
of this decision. After a 1Thile,a member of
the street-car museum association temporarily
adopted IIMoraga and BidIVell
ll
and so the lit-
tle-girl doggies joined a little-boy doggie
named IIIHyou
ll
and an effete mir.ature poodle
entitled Bimbo. They lived happy ever after
for quite some time.
Pretty soon, another member of the street-car mus­
eum association thought that the name IIBidwell
ll
lfaS not very appropriate for a young-adult girl­
doggie and so he went to an old lV.C .Fields movie
and chose the ,name Flower Belle. So now IIMoraga,
Flmler Belle, IIMiyou and Bimbo lived happy
ever after until they had to go to the veterin­
arians to get their distemper shots.
30me time later, Moraga fell illto a state of severe
jepression and one day, being distracted,attempted the
jangerous crossing of Highway 12 ill front of the street­
~ar museum. The result was one-sided and totally fatal.
fter this, Flmler Belle became Flov/er Belle Bidwell.
CANADIAN 109 R A I L
Flower Belle Bidwell lived happy ever after for
quite a while at the street-car museum. She was
a
people-dog and was most friendly to visitors and
other human beings, except nocturnal. Sometimes she
rode on the passenger streetcars at the street-car
museum. Her name was inscribed in the county re­
cords and she registered for social security.
In August of some year, the Railway Superintendent
at the street-car museum noticed that Flower B­
elle had a bad case of (OH HORROR) mange. The
Railway Superintendent immediately transported
IIFlower Belle to the nearby clinic, where her
veterinarian took her case-history and prescri­
bed for her. The Railway Superintendent reques­
ted the nice veterinarian to send the bill to
the street-car museum association.
THEN THE TROUBLE STARTED.
I September of the same year, the officers of the
;reet-car museum association met in plenary session
1 peruse the revenues and disbursements of the as­
lciations museum and among the latter was the bill
)r Flower Belles estheticist treatment. An Of­
Lcer asked for additional information on this charge
, $ 15.25 -improperly-authorized expense -and the
easurer and Secretary spent half-an-hour trying to
~cipher the writing of the laboratory technician who
ld done the diagnostic tests. After a futile thirty
nutes,the Secretary and Treasurer jOintly and sev­
ally recommended to the officers that the bill be
I.id,since this item ~IaS insignificant and was using
) a lot of high-priced executive time and talent.So
Ider the rug it went I
Soon after, the Board of Directors of the street-car
museum association held their inevitable irregular
meeting and during the meeting, one of the items that
was tabled for consideration ~/as the bill for the
fee requested for Flower Belles recent visit to
her veterinarian. The Chairman of the Board, who
had just returned from Europe, was preoccupied ,,11th
shOlqing
his Dan ish street -car pictures, but took
time out to object to the processing of this trans­
action through the street-car museum associations
booles.
He declared that the street-car museum associa­
tions POLICY was to handle such matters on a
philantrophic basis. In a dramatic gesture, the
Secretary of the Corporation donated $ 10,00 in
support of Flower Belles unpaid balance.There
had previously been a $ 5 SUbvention, from a
friend. Another Director provided the remain­
ing 25 cents. Thus it was that the unresolved
CANADIAN 110 R A I L
port ion of the account of Flower Be lle with
the veterinarian Has resolved.
HmVEVER,this resolutior. did not satisfy the Chairman of
the Board of Directors of the street-car museum associa­
tion. At the same moment,another Director who felt that
animals at the street-car museum should be either or. a
leash or carried in cages, moved that the expenditures
and donat ions associated ,lith Flower Belles v is it to
the veterinarian NOT be put through the account books of
the street-car museum association. This motion ,,,as eager­
ly seconded with great enthusiasm by another Director.
THEN CAME THE VOTE.
The Director-mover and the Director-seconder of the motion
rere joined by hTO other unsympathetiC Directors, making
4 in favor of the motion.
The Director-Railway Superintendent and tNO Director-assoc­
iates voted against the hateful motion.
The Director-Chairman of the Board,1Ihile in favor of the
motion,did not vote, since he was the chairman of the meet­
ing and therefore not entitled to vote, strictly speaking.
The r.inth and rema in ing Director Vias absent.
The motior. las therefore inscribed in the offiCial tran­
sactior.s of the street-car museum associatior. as beir.g
passed ar.d ordered ar.d the Treasurer thereafter expunged
utterly from the accounts and ledgers any and all reference
to the transaction.
Some time later, the import of this motion was transmitted
to the members of the street-car museum associatior., ho
nON found themselves totally deprived of the privilege of
taking recognition of any transactior. relating to Flower
Belle -at least, until the next annual meeting of the
street-car museum associatior..
In supporting the motior.,the Chairman of the Board
re-affirmed the street-car museum assocJations
policy that it as the street-car museum associa­
tions chief function to collect,to preserve, to
restore and to exhibit historic electric railway
equipment,not to collect, to preserve or to main­
tain dogs or ducks. The inclusion of the ducks
in this policy statement vTaS not immed iately clear.
SHARP-EYED READERS CAN CATCH A GLIMPSE OF FLOWER-BELLE D ISAPPE,lR I NG
behind Car no. 202 of the Indiana Railroad! Photo courtesy A.LaFlin,jr.

CANADIAN 112 R A I L
Nevertheless,it was the opinion of some of the
Directors that the presence of ducks on the reg­
ular passenger service route at the street-car
museum added some class to the operation. For,
after all, it was pointed out,the most important
and most historic location on the gone-but-not­
forgotten south line (after the l-lorld-famous
Burlingame Siding) was none other than the Duck
Ranch
and there are several stations such as
Mallard and Spoonbill on the neighbouring former
electric interurban railway.
he Board of Directors,having come to this conclusion, lived happy
ver after, together with Flower Belle,for quite some time.
P.S. Although this story sounds a good deal like most
fairy tales, it is really true.
Changing the names dont protect anybody,
not even Flowe r Be lle •
A Souvenir
Of The
London & Lake
Mr. Eric Johnson,Department of
Mechanical Engineering,Univer­
sity of Calgary, recalls the
article by Professor J.I.Coo­
per,McGill University,Montreal,
in the March,1968 issue of
CANADIAN RAIL on the London &
Lake Erie Railway & Transporta­
tion Company of London,Ontario.
Erie
The illustration reproduced herewith appeared in a Brush
~lectric catalogue of uncertain vintage -1900-1914 would be an ap­
?roximation. car number 35 of the Southwestern Traction Company is
;otally UNLIKE any of the cars illustrated in the article, although
Ln general shape,it resembles the car in the drawing on page 61.
Mr. Johnson believes that this illustration is a photograph
)f an actual car,rather than an artists impression. The parallax
)f the window-frames of the far end of the car and of the trucks,
lelps to substantiate this conclusion.
It has been said that the Southwestern Traction Company had
)ther operations in south-central Ontario,so perhaps the car did in
fact belong to another line with the same name. Comments from rea­
lers of CANADIAN RAIL are invited.

HAPPINESS I N HALIFAX
S.S .Worthen
~ny alert chronicler of railway activity in Canadas mari-
time provinces 1ill sometime suddenly become aware that there was
once a man called H.B.Jeffe.rson ,·,ho lived in Halifax,Nova Scotia and
was an independent but knowledgable authority on Maritime railways
and railway personalities,especially those of the Halifax region.Mr.
Jefferson ~as equally a ,Iell-knmm journalist and contributor to
the Halifax newspapers -especially the CHRONICLE-TELEGRAPH -and
/rote a long series of articles for that paper, uSing the nom-de­
plume of J.B .King. you remember: the guy that llrote his name on
everything,including boxcars!
Early in 1970,Mr. Jefferson discovered a rather remarkable
private car on a disused spur near the Strait of Canso. It viaS the
property of the Nova Scotia Pulp & Paper Company and was located at
some distance from their new mill, then under construction at port
HawkesburY,on the Strait of Canso. Here,it had been in use as -of
all things – a residence for the manager of construction at the new
cn.ill.
Having come to a quick decision,Mr. Jefferson was able soon
Ghereafter to finalize the purchase of this rema.rkable railway car.
rIe had identifi.ed it as the private car Ethan Allen of the Rut-
land Railroad,purchased by Nova Scotia Pulp & Pape.r about seven
)fears ago. The Ethan Allen lTaS built in 1891 by the pullman Com­
p
any as their charter private car Pilgrim.
Although the Ethan Allen that Mr. Jefferson bought was
somewhat piebald on the exterior,the interior vias in unbeliev­
~bly excellent condition,with hardly a scratch on the woodwork. The
running gear was also in first-rate condition and with a little oil
md grease, the move from its rather remote locatio!: to t he main li-
1e,while costing a small fortune,Tas relatively uncomplicated. Hhen
Ghe IIEthan Allen hit the main line,she ran like a charm, making a
regular passenger train 60-per dthout so much as a creak or gr-
Early in April,1970,the Ethan Allen las in Canadian Na-
Gionals Rockingham Yard,Halifax and shortly thereafter,she was
noved
to Fairview Roundhouse,where interested local enthusiasts came
GO marvel at the elegant interior.
Divided into four large staterooms,a kitchen,a shower and
GOilets,the accessories included french mirrors; the whole vehicle
lias enhanced by brass -rai 1 platforms and an observation lounge. There
lias also bed linens and blankets, silver, china and stemware. The
~hina -las 22-carat gold-trinuned.
Mr. Jefferson intended to paint the Ethan Allen a deep
?ullman green 11 th gold lettering. The name of the railway company,
~hosen by Mr. Jefferson to identify the car was:
THE BOSTON,PARRSBORO & LONDONDERRY
Railway and steam Navigation Company.
rhis was a Nova Scotia entity,originally incorporated in 1882,which
1ever got beyond the egg stage. That is to say,it didnt hatchl
Mr. Jefferson was a competent journalist all of his life.He
CANADIAN
115
R A I L
)egan vlri ting about railways as early as 1912 and completed 191 ar-
;icles on the railways of Nova Scotia. In the pursuance of his
journalistic activities,he went to Moncton,N.B. In the summer of
L970 and it VIaS while he was l.;orting there that he Vias stricken by
t massive and fatal heart attack.
v·Jhile Mr. Jefferson had planned to donate the Ethan Allen
me day to the Scotian Railroad Society, of which he HaS a member,
1e had not been able to put, this intention in writing prior to his
leath. This meant that the Ethan Allen became part of his estate
md subject to his executors and his heirs.
Hhen it became appatent that the Ethan Allen might be sold
;0 the highest bidder,the officers of the Scotian Railroad Society,
tnder the able leadership of their president, Dr. Stephen Bedwell,
luickly began to make inquiries and representations which they hoped
lOuld result in the acquiSition by the Society of this extraordi-
lary private car. The process of presenting and supporting these for­
IIal representations laS long, involved and sometimes discouraging. The
;ociety demonstrated that it l~aS in earnest by making a cash offer
or the car. The executors of the late Mr. Jeffersons estate enter­
;ained these representations and the offer 11 th great civility.
It 1IaS lith the greatest happiness,pride and a supreme sen­
:e of accomplishment that on February 3, 1971,Dr. Stephen F. Bedwell,
reSident of the Scotian Railroad Society, announced that the So-
:iety had acquired the private ca.r Ethan Allen, formerly of the
lutland Railroad,for preservation in Nova Scotia and that it would
)e a fitting companion to the eX-Intercolonial Railway Companys
me-time (1875) coach, latterly (1892) a baggage car,more recently
Jart of Canadian Nationals Museum Train, which was donated to the
;cotian Railroad Society in 1969 and in which the SOCiety has or­
;anized the nucleus of their museum (CANADIAN RAIL no. 212, July­
luguSt, 1969).
As you can well imagine, the cash offer for the If Ethan
Illen has severely depleted the Societys capital cash account and
inancial assistance at this time for the Ethan Allen project is
ery 1elcome. While the Society has not said so,it may probably be
:afely assumed that a picture of this remarkable car would be pro­
ided to contributors to the project. The SOCiety earnestly soli­
:1 ts support in the realization of the late Nr. H.B .Jefferson s gr-
at intention. Your assistance should be directed to the Ethan
,llen projectlf,The Scotian RaihIaY Society,p.O.Box 798,Armdale post­
,1 Station ,Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada • Contributions are eligible for
.ncome tax purpose s •
. N MARCH,1970,THE PRIVATE CAR ETHAN ALLEN CAME FROM THE SHORES OF THE
itrait of Canso to the outskirts of Halifax. The first part of the jour­
ley was made on a Canadian National Railways way-freight.
JURING THE INSPECTION PERIOD IN 1968,PRIOR TO THE PURCHASE OF THE PRI­
ate car, the late Mr. H.B.Jefferson was photographed in the dining por­
ion of the Ethan Allen,while she was still at Pbrt Hawkesbury,N.S.
Photo courtesy Scotian Railroad Society.

F..A. . ~ E l.Y.IP
Postscript to .•• NO ViIRES IN WINNIPEG ?
>lires in Vlinnipeg there may have been, and trolleybuses there may
~ave been, but there was no power in the network after 1915 hours
In October 30,1970.
3 THE SIGN SAYS: METRO WINNIPEGS
3st trolley bus run: October 30,
370.Passengers on this run inclu-
3d (1. to r.) Supervisor V. 8eau­
ry,Supt. of Electrical Distribution
.tl. Simister, Ass t. Superintendent of
ransportation A. Painchaud,Manager
F Transit Operations R.W.Church,
Jperintendent of Schedules R.G.Fer­
Json and Superintennent of Trans­
Jrtation C.E.LaForme.
lOtO Winnipeg Transit Commission.
BUMPITY -BUlJiP :Bm,IPITY -CLANK :BUMPITY -TINKLE – – –
February 1970 started out as a no-good for both Canadian National
and CP RAIL. Alex Olynyk,CNs manager of passenger sales and ser­
vices announced cancellation of TURBO services between Montreal and
Toronto for the second time in the two-year history of this new
transportatior. mode. Reasor. given was mechanical difficulties.The
trouble was not a single problem, although the suspension system and
cold weather capabili tyhad been less Ulan satisfactory recently •
Added were
operating problems, poor reliability and out-of-service
units, which latterly resulted in withdrawal of one daily service of
the two previously scheduled. Mr. Olynyk said TURBO service would
be resumed as soon as r.ew problems had been remedied. Track 6 at
Montreals Central Statior. will be fully occupied once again.
The Railway Transport Committee of the Canadian Transport Commission
rejected both Canadian National and CP RAIL proposals for a Ration­
alization of transcontir.ental services (SUPER-CONTINENTAL and CAN­
ADIAN) and told CP RAIL to keep on running the CANADIAN daily. The
CTC said CP RAIL still hadnt got to the heart of the matter of
cost reduction, but agreed with the proposal to increase fares, es­
pecially the prices of berths and meals. CP RAIL, said the CTC,should
forecast traffic better,with consequently greater flexibility in the
train size. The CTC quoted the r.-!ani to ba governments content ion that
it may not be esser.tial for CN ar.d CP RAIL to operate a competitive
passer.ger service. Manitoba asserted that a single service on one
CANADIAN 118 R A I L
line,either jointly or individually operated, would result in the
eliminatiou of duplicate overhead costs. Ontario thought that some
sort of integrated service was the answer.When all the interested
parties had had their say before the Commission, it was resolved that
the next step would be for the CTC and the two railway companies to
plan for an integrated transcontinental passenger service; after
which it will invite a fresh round of briefs from provincial and
municipal governments and others. Bumpity-tinkle.
BULLDOZER, SPARE THAT ANCIENT PILE – – –
Last years announcement that Toronto Union Station would be razed
to make way for yet another urban redevelopment project was follow­
ed in the latter months of 1970 by yet another shocking disclosure:
a ten-year plan was announced (entitled .t-1ARATHON II) 1/hich would
result in the demolit ion of Canad ian Pacifics grey-stone landmark,
llindsor Station in Montreal -headquarters of the Company since its
opening in 1889. Canadian Pacific real-estate subsidiary, Marathon
Realty,proposes to reorganize considerably the area bounded by Peel
(formerly Hindsor) Street,St-Antoine and Mountain Streets and Dor­
chester Boulevard. This area includes the Laurentien Hotel and st.
Georges Anglican Church, in addition to THE Station and ancillary
buildings.
The station itself,although opened in 1889,was not completed
to its present form until 1928,but the additions -/ere l{ept consistent
with the original romanesque style, lith rough stone fac ing. Addi­
tions to office space and express facilities Iere made on both sides
of the track area in the 1950s, but these were in a more modery sty­
le,faced Hith brown brick.
There are now ten tracks used for passenger traffic and two
short spurs, formerly used for express traffic prior to the removal
of this service to a ne~1 terminal in Lachine. The tracks are cover­
ed by a Bush trainshed,Iith supports on every second platform.The
longest track has room for 20 coaches, but the shortest /ill accommo­
date only six.
On at least five days of the Ieek,22 trains operate in ar.d
out of Hindsor,of which 13 are suburban and 8 long-distar.ce. The
Mont
Laurier service operates three days a weel{. The glass-topped
concourse, at right-angles to the ends of the tracks, is level with
Lagauchetiere Street on the north side,but three floors above st-
Antoine on the south. It is connected by a covered passageway to
Bonaventure Statior. on the METRO and by a pair of automatic hy-
draulic elevators to the corner of St-Antoine and Peel streets. The
building, including the fourteen-stprey tower, is served by hydraulic
elevators, which rise to the upper floors on long steel pistons, ac­
tuated by ~later pressure. The ever-growing requirement for office
space,which recently gobbled up most of the 1Iaiting room,has r.011 al­
so absorbed the coffee shop, leaving only the station buffet and the
beaut 1fully-panelled Alouette Room as places to eat and dine .How­
ever, the concourse has received a badly-needed ne,I coat of paint,
1hich has altered its colour from the traditional green to an at­
tractive light grey,so perhaps the steel-shod bulldozer is a few
years away,yetl
CANADIAN 119 R A I L
THE SLOH HISTORICAL PROCESS — – –
The
following report is reproduced verbatim from the colurrm Per_
tinent Paragraphs in the RAILWAY MAGAZINE,London,England, for the
month of October,1901 and is presented courtesy of the Editor:
ELECTRIC l The Directors of the Canadian Pacific Railway are
considering the desirability of removing the steam
locomotives on the high mountain grades in the Rock­
ies and of having recourse to electric power. It is
well knovm that for some time past the company has
had electricians at work studying the practicability
of utilizing the ener·gy contained in the vast ITater
powers of the Rocky Mountains as a means of supply­
ing electric pOVlel to haul the trains up the steep
grades. At present a number of banking engines have
to be kept at t11ese points to assist in hauling the
trains. The greatest difficulty the electricians
have been trying to overcome is the transrni tting of
the pOl~er over a long distance.
SuperintendeDt Timmerman in the employ of the C.P.R.
at Toronto, firmly bell.eves, hovlever, that the scheme
can be carried through successfully, and that, owing
to the unlirni ted water povler available for econom­
ically developing electric energy, the latter will
take the place of steam power all through the Rock­
ies.
DISPOSTIION :DEHOLTIION —
canadian Pacifics Mile End Station,a rather dated red brick struc­
ture,closed since the Parl~ Avenue Station Has opened in 1932, was
recently demolisl1ecl to malce way for a nel[ viaduct conDect ing Van
Horne Avenue
with Rosemont Boulevard. The same project also necess­
itated the razing and removal of part of the St-Denis Garage (Shops)
of the MUCTC. Usines St-DeDis,or at least a part of them,are best
remembered by C.R.H.A .ancients as thE place where thE restoration
of M.S.R. no. 274 -the Associations single-end, single truck New­
buryport streetcar -began back in 1951. This deck-roof car was don­
ated to the Association in 1950,after 38 years of service as a salt
car. It was the first unit of rolling stock preserved by the Asso­
ciation and is now at the Canadian Railway Museum,Delson/St-Const­
ant,Que.
t40NTREAL TRAI1!IIAYS COIlPANY ROT ARY S~JOWPLOW NUMBER 1, AT THE t~OUNT RovAL
Car Barns on May 14,1949. Montr~al sure could have used this in March,
1971. Photo E.A.Toohey Collection,C.R.H.A.
CANADIAN RAIL
published by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICA.L ASSOCIATION ~~~t~:,:2Qu~:OO S
Assooiate Membership inoluding 11 issues of
Canadian Rail e. 00 annually.
EDITOR S.S. VlTort.hen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A Kemp
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beat.t.y & F.F.Angus
VISIT THE
Cfluadiflll Rflilway Museum Lv
~~
VISITEZ LE
Musee Ferroviailc CallflJien
OPEN MAY SEPT. OUVERT MAl -SEPT.
Our 10th. Anniversary Notre 10em. Annlversnlre.
DIRECTOR OF BRANCHES
C.N.K.Hcnrd, 74 Southern Drive, Ottawa 1, Canada
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP SERVICES J,A,BEATTY
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA W.R.Llnley, Secty •• P.D.Box 141, Terminal A, Ottawa.
ROCKY KOUNTAIN Mr.Donald W.Sco.fe 12407 Lansdowne Drive, Apt .. 101 Edmonton.
PAC1FIC COAST Mr .. Barrle Sanford,Secty. ,P.O.Box 1006 stn. A, Vancouver.
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY
SflSKATCHEOlAN
PACIFIC COAST
FAR EAST
BRITISH ISLES
NANIIOBA
ALBEnTA
K.F.Chlvers. Apt. JJ 67 Son:elset St, ….. ., Ottowa, Qnt&rl0.
J.S.Nlcholoson, 2)06 Arnold st., Saskatoon. Saskatchellen.
Peter Cox, 609 Cottonwood Ave Coqultlam, Drltlsh Colun:ble.
W.D.Hc)(eom, 6-7. 4-chome, Yamate-cho,Sulta City. Osaka, Japan.
J.H.Sonders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Beds., England.
K.G.Younger, 267 Vernon Rood, Wlnnipeg. t~anitoba.
rlr. Donald W.Scafe,12407 l.£lnsdowne Dr1ve, Apt. 101, Edmonton Alta,
Copyright 1971 Printed in Canada on Canadian Paper

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