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Canadian Rail 229 1971

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Canadian Rail 229 1971

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Cffi.~fin
JASON
1VO.229
FEBFl.£J..A..Fl.Y 1971
C. FIERCE
1778-1851
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o
P
l~U J!{ J! a·;, ~ J!
. . . … .
. . . .. .
John Beswarick Thompson
Ed itor s Note:
Since the opening of Canadas first
public railway on July 23,1836, a
number
of articles have been written
about the Champlain & St. La~rence
Rail Road. However,the man who was
principally responsible for the com­
pletion of this enterprise and the
steam locomotive which bore his name
have only been mentioned in passing.
It is with pleasure, therefore, that
the following paper is presented.It
is a real contribution to the his­
tory of Canadas first public rail­
way and its chief patron.
I n March of the year 1836 Jason C. Pierce a fifty-seven
year old merchant and forwarder of St. Johns, Lower
Canada, ~rote to George Redd ington of Williamstown, Up­
per Canada confidently predicting, !lOur railroad ~ill
in all probability go into operation in July!l. (1)
Pierces optimism was well-founded for at the time he was wri­
Ging his letter the roadbed of the Champlain and St.La~rence Rail
Road had been graded and the bridges had been built on the l4t mile
line under the supervision of the able Chief Engineer,William R.
Casey. (2) Indeed,a locomotive had been ordered by the Commissioner
(General Manager) of the company,H .D.Lindsay,a former Customs Of­
ficer at st. Johns (3), and it was about to be shipped to Canada
by the famed English locomotive builder,Robert Stephenson. (4) The
day after Pierce sent his letter the Morning Courier of Montreal
reported: (5)
… ~ ..
Jason C. Pierce C1778-1851),the Man -the projector and principal pro­
moter of-Canadas first public railway.Collection Senator A.W.Roebuck.
–rhis pen-and-ink sketch,photographed,enlarged and appearing opposite,may
uell be one of the earliest sketches of a locomotive for a Canadian rail­
road. It appears in a dimension of about 1 1/2 by 2 inches on the bottom
Jf an aide-memoire dated 1839 and inse~ted in an account book of the
:hamplain-& St. Lawrence Rail Road. It is almost certainly a sketch of
the JASON C. PIERCE, since it is obviously a Norris B type 4-2-0. The
Jlacement of the driving wheels in relation to the vertical firebox is
the same as that of the replica of the LAFAYETTE of the Baltimore & Ohio
~ailroad,the original of which was built by William Norris of Philadel­
Jhia,Pa.,U.S.A. in 1837. Photo courtesy Public Archives of Canada.
CANADIAN 28 R A I L
As soon as the snow disappears and the ground
dries the line will be examined by the Engineer and
such parts as may have been injured during the win­
ter levelledjafter which ••••. the laying of the rails
will be commenced.
The
opening of Canadas first railway -an event which the Ga­
!tte claimed would be one of the proudest days in the annals of
mer Canad ian improvement (6) -was but four months away, and in
) small way the achievement vIas due to Jason C. Pierce, as the Dir-
:tors Report of 1835 had pOinted out:
When in February 1832,when the Act was passed
permitting the Petitioners to build a Railroad, it
was apparently so cramped with restrictions,as for
a while,to become a dead letter,nor ,as it till
November 1834,when Mr. Pierce of st. Johns,by his
exertions, obtained a sufficient number of sub­
scribers to preserve the charter from falling thr­
ough ••••••• It is,therefore,to that gentleman •.••
that the country and the community are chiefly in-
debted for the advantages already received and
likely to accrue.
principal
lauded
its
Another observer later called him the projector and
oooter of the railroad (8),while an American nevlspaper
:son Pierces zeal and activity in prosecuting the work to
,mplet ion (9) •
Business acumen, not community altruism had motivated Pierces
xertions. Born in Sandersfield,Massachusetts,he had moved to
vIer Canada in 1817 and eight years later had established himself
St. Johns,the head of river navigation on the Richelieu. There
,e Champlain Transportation Company, whose vessels linked Lower
nada with the United states,appointed him agent at their north­
n terminus (10). In st. Johns he had established his forwarding
siness which sent Upper Canadian lumber to the United states, wh­
,t
to Montreal and American manufactured goods to the Canad ian mel­
ants. The Champlain and st. Lawrence, planned as it had been to
rYe as a shortcut from the st. Lawrence to the Richelieu,vlOuld ex­
dite the transportation of goods and would improve Pierces bus­
ess. In addition,if the new railway increased the number of pas­
ngers using the Champlain Transportation Companys trIO boats, the
ranlclin and the vlinooski, Jason C. Pierce would also prosper.
Although Pierce had been voted a Director of the railroad and
d worked
zealously to find buyers for the companys stock, he him­
lf had purchased only five shares in the railroad (12). His cap­
al had remained in his business. A business,no doubt, that in
rch 1836 he hoped the new railroad vlould serve to increase.
CANADIAN
29
R A I L
July 21,1836
Jason Pierces prediction had been correct. On Thursday, July
21 1836 Lord Gosford,governor-in-chief of Canada,and.a host of dig­
nitariesasseIDbled to officially open the Champlain and St. Lawren­
ce Rail Road.
Thomas
storrow Brown,a radical Montreal journalist who a year
and a half later led the Patriotes in the disasterous Battle of St.
Charles,attended the opening. Altnough an avowed political opponent
of the Tories whose capital had built the railway,Brown lyrically
wrote an approving account of the occasion (13):
A ticket from a friend entitled me to attend
the celebration of the opening of the Champlain
and st. Lawrence Rail Road on Thursday last. The
day was beautiful,and as Montreal poured forth
her bounty and chivalry I joined the happy throng
rejoicing in the idea of a comfortable ride to
st. Johns. A balmy air floated above us,a glit­
tering expanse of water beneath, and my heart glad­
dened at the prospect of enjoying a few hours of
subliminary happiness in the midst of a ooncourse
of fellow citizens.
Upon reaching Laprairie we found cars in readi­
ness; two were dispatched by the locomotive and the
remainder taken in tow by horses. Transit occupied
a couple of hours, giving an opportunity of examin­
ing the work and certainly too much praise cannot
be bestowed on the conductors of the neat,orderly ,
and
first rate manner in which the whole line has
been conducted and completed.
At the Station House, st. Johns,a hogshead of
lemonade was set upon •••••.• An abundant collation
was spread over four long tables and there was no
scant of the very best wines the market affords.
We returned ••••••• delighted with the excursion
and hoping that in a fel minutes our glowing des­
cription of the day would make us the envy of all
Montreal.
Brown judged Canadas first railway to be first rate. We in
Canada are so accustomed to see things done ill, he added wryly,
that a work well done is a miracle.
The First Season
The gaiety of the official opening was soon dissipated by the
difficulties inherent in any new operation. The Champlain and st.
Lawrence had its full share of problems in its first season of op­
erat ions:
CANADIAN
30
R A I L
, .

The St. Johns,Lower Canada,section of a Map of the Champlain and St.
Lawrence Rail Road as levelled and surveyed by William R. Casey,Civil
Engineer and Hiram Corey,Land Surveyor;November 1834 shows the sou­
thern terminus of the railway,located near the property of Jason C.
Pierce. Map Division-Public Archives of Canada •
• • • • •
30_July (14)
The Champlain and st. Lawrence beg to inform the
public that they are not yet prepared to carry frei­
ght to St. Johns.
9 August (15)
le are glad to learn that the locomotive is again
in operation on the St. Johns railroad. The new en­
gineer has given it an examination and made a trial
of its speed yesterday.
CANADIAN
31
R A I L
9 August (16 )
An unfortunate man whilst attempting to embark
in one of the Rail Road cars, got his leg unfortu­
nately entangled in one of the wheels and injured
to the extent that it had to amputated. The man
did not survive the accident more than twelve
hours.
10 August (17)
For cartage of Locomotive & Cars by horses •. £ 3.2.6
16 August (18)
Here is another effect of a want of proper ar­
rangements between the Champlain Steamboats ahd
the Railroad Company •••••• The locomotive started
this morning at 5 minutes before 8 and the steam­
boat had been in sight more than 5 minutes and in
10 minutes after that was alongside the ,..,harf .The
mail contractor stated to those who had the man­
agement of the Railroad that the boat was in sight,
but they would not wait ••••••••
19 August (19)
Arrived at Laprairie and had to wait some time
the return of the locomotive and cars from st.
Johns ••••• When we were on the point of starting
for st. Johns,part of the machinery of the loco­
motive gave way •••••• The engineer, however, after
some trouble,was enabled to put the engine into
such a state as to put it in our power to proceed •
• •
•• He had not got more than a mile over the
road, when the deplorable concern gave way again •
31 October (20)
I send you a bill of the Champlain and st. Law­
rence Rail Road for fre ight ••• from which it will
be
evident that instead of the Company1s operations
lessening the price of freight they have increased
it more than double. If the bill •••• is to be estab­
lished as the regular tariff •••• farmers and others
will find a great saving of expense by taking their
teams as heretofore to Laprairie.
2 November (21)
We have heard many complaints against those em­
ployed by the Rail Road Company for rudeness, incivility
and overcharge.
Plagued by problems and peppered by complaints,The Champlain
and st. Lawrence muddled through its opening season until the fir­
st of December when,almost mercifully, the advent of winter closed
down the line. At the half yearly meeting of stockholders held on
the t,..,elfth of December 1836,the problems were discussed and solu­
tions were proposed.
i
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CANADIAN
33
R A I L
The Second Locomotive
One of the railroads gravest problems was the unreliable per­
formance of their English 0-4-0 locomotive. Succeeding generations
have venerated this engine through imaginat ive illustrat ions and
full-sized recreations; hOvever, the locomotive merits such atten­
tion not because it Vas a suitable and efficient machine for Can­
adas first railv.ray,but because it Vas simply Canadas first loco­
motive. Indeed,the Dorchester,as it Vas called,had been tried and
found wanting.
As early as 1835 it had been the companys intent ion to place
at first only one locomotive on the line,and to add others if ne­
cessary. (22) It had become necessary. Accord ingly the sharehol-
ders resolyed to purchase a second locomotive -one built in the
United States,not in England -and they chose William Casey, the
American c iv il engineer who had so successfully built the railVay
and who had prev iously purchased four passenger cars for the com­
pany from a manufacturer in Troy,New York,to make the purchase.
A rough handwritten expense account submitted by the Commis-
sioner,H .D.Lindsay,Vho accompanied Casey, traces the odyssey in
search of a new locomot ive : (23)
1837-Feby-own & Mr, Casys(sic) travelling expenses
to Boston,Providence,& Philadelphia for loco­
motive & information ••.•.••••••••.• ,£ 54.0.0
Their winter travels ended in Philadelphia. There they visited
vlilliam Norris whose locomotives had in 1836 taken the engineering
world by storm (24) and there they placed an order for Canadas
second locomotive. Norris later sold his locomotives from Prussia
to Chile, but the first export orde r he rece ived was from the Cham­
plain and st. Lawrence Rail Road of Canada.
No records have been discovered to verify the exact specifica­
tions of the locomotive ordered; hmvever, it apparently Vas a Norris
Class B type having one pair of driving 1vheels and a four-wheeled
sw ive lling truck at the front. (25)
In late March 1837 W.D.Lindsay,in making preparations to bring
the locomotive from Philadelphia to Canada,wrote to P. Doolittle of
the Champlain Transportation Company in Burlington:(26)
He are making arrangements to engage a boat at
Hhitehall or Troy to proceed there to Philadelphia
for the purpose of bringing in a locomotie engine
built for this Company by Mr. Norris of that place
which is to be ready for shipment about the 5th of
…….
• The steamboat Jinooski II and the railroad wharf is shown in this sketch
by Lieutenant Phillip J. 8ainbrigge.l1l though it is entitled liSt. Johns
-Nov. 1037,it appears to have been made from the British fort south of
the wharf and the town shown in the background is St-Athenase (now cal­
led Iberville) across the Richelieu Riv8r from St. Johns.
Public Archives of Canada.
CANADIAN
34
R A I L
!
April. I learn from Mr. Pierce that your company
are about to send to the same place for the boil­
ers for their new boats. Now would it not be of
mutual advantage to us to send a boat as will ac­
complish the wishes of both parties.
In May Lindsay travelled to New York to supervise the shipping.
:27) Judging by the schedule, the new locomotive was in service on
;he
Champlain and st. Lawrence by mid-May. (28)
It was customary at the time for railroad companies to christen
)ach locomotive and to request the builder to place appropriate name
)lates on the engine before it was delivered. The name chosen by the
:hamplain and St. Lawrence for their new locomot ive was the Jason
:. Pierce. No doubt this tribute was in honour of Jason Piercers
)arlier efforts on behalf of the railway; however, in addition, dur­
Lng the companys first season pierce had been the railroads best
:ustomer, as the following table shows: (29)
,.
SUMS PAID BY JASON C. PIERCE
TO THE RAILROAD IN 1836
Freight for Freight for
Month st. Johns Laprairie
~ s d c£ s d
July 31 18
7 2 13 6
August 41 2 7
79
6 7
september 50 4 7 69 12
9
October 85 9 7 336 17 4
November 197
11 6 684 12 8
Totals 406 6 2 1,173 2 10
Pierce had sent the first consignment of freight over the line
lfter the official opening in July. (30) His shipments had increas­
!d in each successive month -even though the railway had not been
lble to acce.pt freight from the general public until the first of
)ctober (31) -until they reached a peak in November when an as­
;ounding amount of wheat was shipped from st. Johns to the Montreal
narket (32). He had paid the Champlain and st. Lawrence almost
1,600 in less than five months. Indeed,he remained the railways
Jest customer until his death fifteen years later (33). No doubt
;he shareholders did not object to the decision to call Canadas
,econd loco mot i ve the Jason C. pie rce •
rhe Second
Season
In an attempt to prevent those losses, mistakes and vexations
(34) which had occurred in 1836,the Champlain and st. Lawrence be­
~an its second season armed lith a new set of freight regulations
md nelf by-laws,which among other things,prohibited smoking in the
first class cars and decreed No person allOlled to go on Engine un­
jer a penalty of lOs for each offence(35). The most significant in­
:lovation of 1837,hOlleVer,vras the new schedule. The new locomotive
CANADIAN
35
R A I L
enabled the company to have two trains running. The first left St.
Johns at five 0 clock in the morning; the second left at nine. The
first train from Laprairie departed at ten oclock. The company hir­
ed a second locomotive engineer,a gentleman IIlith the appropriate
name of Le,lis Tripp(36). He joined H. BOUghton,an American who had
worked
as Canadas first regularly-appointed engineer since August
1836
(37).
Although the new schedule was to have gone into effect on the
twenty-third of May, owing to the extraord inary he ight of wate r in
the St. La1rence,and the impossibility bf using the companys wharf
at Laprairie,it did not begin until mid-June (38). It was well
received. An Eastern TOllTnships newspaper which had been hostile to
the railway in 1836,highly approved of the improvement of service:(39)
Our neighbours in this district will see from the
Railroad advertisement •••• that the Cars leave St.Johns
at 5 of the clock A.Mo for the 6 oclock Boat, thus
allolling from 7 A.M. to 5 P.M. in Montreal for the
transaction of business;-giving them the chance of
sending out freight, intended for the Townships by the
one of the clock Boat. This freight is sure to reach
st. Johns that evening and very probably by the same
trip,as the Cars then do not leave Laprairie till an
hour after the arrival of the Boat.
The arrangement continued until the fall when .follolling the de­
parture of locomotive engineer Boughton and the onset of dark au­
tumn mornings,the early train from st. Johns was canqelled and the
Company returned to a schedule which required only one train in op­
eration (40).
The company never again returned to their 1837 summer schedule
in the years that followed. Possibly the railway found that its tr­
affic did not justify the cost of running two trains. In the ,early
days of railroading,for instance, engineers were highly paid employ­
ees and in addition to paying Boughton an annual salary of ~ 225,
the company had given Lewis Trippe£2l0 per year for his services(41).
The Champlain and st. Lawrence likely also found that it was more
advantageous to have one train and two locomotives so that if one
locomotive broke down, the second could take its place,for judging
by the following account, the Dorchester had again required mech­
anical attention in 1837 (42):
Cash paid to Ward & Co. in full of their Acct.for
sundry repairs done to the Small Locomotive Engine
& freight cars etc. for the year 1837 & up to the
22nd June 38…………………….. £ 89.9.0
Nevertheless during the season of 1837 the railway received a
few
complaints about its service. One gentleman llriting in the Mon­
treal Transcript in July,after noting that an English locomotive
had recently run twelve miles in ten minutes, concluded sarcastically,
CANADIAN R A I L
He have heard it remarked that the locomotive on the st. Johns Rail­
oad is sinking into the opposite extreme(43). A Herald correspon­
ent 1ho relied not on hearsay but on experience sympathet ically com­
.
ented on the railways sloTer service (44):
I crossed to Laprairie by the Princess Victoria •••
The Queen of Canadian Steamboats. After a pleasant
passage we exchanged the steamboat for the railroad
cars. I had never previously been towed by the loco­
motive engine,having on two or three occasions been
drawn by horses; but I found that the speed of the
train was not much more than half lhat it used to be
during the first season. The truth is, that extremely
rapid motion costs more than it is lOrth by shaking
and loosening the rails and sleepers ••••••
Service,sloTer but surer, still managed to impress a rural Tom­
hips resident (45):
On board the Rail Car propelled by steam, you can
get no d ist inct idea of the fie ld s ove r wh ich you
seem to fly,or of the trees and animals and houses
of Thich you catch a glimpse,on account of the vel­
ocity of your motion.
All in all, the railways second season ms successful, and the
Jason C. Pierce had helped to make it so. 1lith hTO locomotives,for
nstance,the companys embarrassing bill for horse cartage dim.inish­
d from a four-month 1836 total ofc:f 256 to a seven-Illonth 1837 total
·f .€lll (46). The greatest proof of the seasons success, however,
ame at the shareholders meeting held in December,two days after
he last battle in the Rebellion of 1837,when a profit of over
2,600 las diSClosed (47) and a dividend -the companys first -of
2.10.0 per share Tas declared (48).
:ubsequent Service
In many lays the season of 1837 set the standard upon which
·perations of the Champlain and st. Lawrence were patterned for the
,ext decade. The September 1837 schedule served as the bas is for
thers that follOled; the Dorchester and the Engine Jason, as
,ne gentleman called it,remained the railwayS only t1olOCOmotives
ntil 1846 (~·9).
The company must have been relatively pleased with the perfor­
ance of their second locomotive for around 1839 (50) they altered
.he original and unsat isfactory 0-4-0 wheel arrangement of the
Dorchester to the 4-2-0 Theel arrangement of the Jason C. Pierce.
his is confirmed in a letter written in 1846 by Conunissioner H .D.
,indsay to 14.1 .Baldwin,the Philadelphia locomotive builder,ordering
smoke pipe for a small English Engine(51):
The Engine was when first imported, a Six ton 4 wheel
ins ide connect ion lhich Te changed into a 6 whee 1 say
This roughly-sketched plan of St. Johns was made by Bainbrigge in 1839.
At the top left are the railroad offices of the Champlain & St. Lawren­
ce. There the track divides with one branch continuing past the build­
ings of Mr. Pierce to the wharf.
Note: This sketch was made on two opposite leaves of a notebook entitled
–Roads Along the Frontier and in Upper Canada and these two sec-
tions have been attached by the author. Public Archives of Canada.
-……
lj. truck & 2 drivers which added about a ton to the
we ight of the Engine.
Imitatior. is the sincerest form of flattery1
.1 t I
… ~.
TheJason C. Pierce,however,had its faults as Lindsay pointed
out in another letter to Baldwin (52):
There certainly is a very marked difference be­
tween the Tender which came with Norriss Engine &
the one we imported from Stephenson.
American builders do not bestow the care and at­
tention to the shape & general arrangement of this
necessary appendage.
Spare us from that curse of Locomotives -Leaky
Flues -Nooriss (sic) Engine having given us a good
deal of Trouble in this ilay, while Stephensons has
been the very reverse •••••• I put a new set of tubes
into Norrisrs Engine (which had been 2 inches) since
which the Engine has done very much better ••••..
Even though the Jason C. Pierce had given the company trouble
(with a capital T), in December 1845 Lindsay called it our best En­
gine r.ow 9 seasons in use. (53)
While during the early 1840
rs
the two original locomotives had
been sufficient to enable the company to annually turn in a profit ,
ir.
1845 the Commissioner anxiously wrote, rtUp to the present time we
stand alone in this country; yet there are Rail Roads about to spring
up all around us; (54) and in the same year the threat of compet it ion
sent him to investigate new locomot ive mode ls in the United states. (55)
By this time the 4-4-0 type had successfully established itself on
the rapidly-multiplying American lines,and in December 1845 the Cham­
plain and st. Lawrence ordered a 4-4-0 from Bald~1in of Philadelphia.
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lRA.TION 1 D
Two branches of the rail road lead to the Richelieu River in this map of
St. Johns made in 1841. It is interesting to note the elevations which
the supposedly level rail road had to overcome between the Richelieu
and the small creek to the rear of the town.
Note: The structures marked A, //13,
cations which were never built.
D and E were prollosed frJrtifi­
Public ~rchives of Canada.
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CANADIAN
39
R A I L
Placed in serv ice in 1846, the new locomotives performance
Lindsay to write Baldwin: (56)
The
locomotive Montreal •••• I am happy to say is in
most respects such a Machine as I would trust will
do every credit to your establishment.
prompted
At the same time Lindsay also reported that two of our Loco-
motives are sadly out of order, and although he 1as desirous of re­
pairing them next winter, the inadequac ies of the two original loco­
motives had no doubt become apparent. Following the acquisition in
1848 of a second 4-4-0,the Champlain built by NorriS, (57) ar.d the
delivery of the Scottish-built TtJohr. Molson in 1849, (58), the Dor­
chesterar.d the Jason C. Pierce had become expendable. As far –as-
the Champlain and St. Lawrer.ce was concerned, they had reached the
end of the line.
Sold Down The River
In 1849 the construction of La Compagnie du Chemin a Rails du
saint-Laurent et du village dIndustrie,a twelve mile line runnir.g
from Lanoraie on the north shore of the st. Lawrence to the town to­
day known as Jol1ette,Que.,enabled the Champlain and St. Lawrence to
dispose of their original locomotive, the Dorchester,profitably.Hav­
ing a capital investment of only,~ 12, 000 -low in comparison with
other railways of the period -and constructed on very economical pr­
inciples (59),the Industrie railway was in the market for cheap equip­
ment,and the Champlain and St. Lavrence,which laS then involved in a
project to extend its line south to Rouses Point, was happy to provide
it. Accordingly,in addition to old iron rails,twelve freight cars,and
one first class passenger car; the Dorchester was sent down-river
to Ianoraie. It fetched£ 500. (60)
Once the Industrie railway opened to the public in May 1850, it
found,as had the Champlain and St. Lawrence in 1836,that the Dorches­
ter alone was not sufficient. Soon after,the following transaction
was recorded:(61)
22 July 1850
Sold and delivered
Locomotive J.C.pierce & 12 frt. Cars ••.•• pf1500
If, as in 1849, the f re ight cars we re bought for 25 each, the Jason C.
Pierce sold for..f: 1200 -over double the price of the Dorchester
The great difference in value between the two locomotives was likely
due to the rebuild 1r.g of the Pierce from a 4-2-0 to a 4-4-0 by the
Champlain and St. Lawrence sometime before it was delivered. (62)
Although it is known that the Dorchester remained in service
until 1864 when an accident caused it to be scrapped, (63) little is
known of the subsequent history of the Jason C. Pierce. It had been
believed that the locomotive became the property of the Canadian Pac­
ific Railway and was sold in 1889 to the LAssomption Railway(64);
CANADIAN
40
R A I L
ro/ever,new evidence has cast doubt on this report(65), and an ac-
:urate account remains to be written. The IIJason C. Pierce seems to
lave at least endured unt il the early 1880 s – a forty-five year re­
:ord of service which was no mean achievement.
rason C. pierce The Man
The gentleman whose name had graced Canadas second locomotive
Lived to see it make its last run from st. Johns. He also lived to
lee the first freight train operate over the new Rouses point exten­
lion of the Champlain and St. Lawrence. To the Gazette this first in­
;ernational train bet1een Canada and the United States was lithe pre­
:ursor of a traffic of vlhich the extent is incalculable (66). To

ierce it must have signalled the end of st. Johns role as an impor­
;ant terminus. The freight train made its trip on the fourth of Sep­
;ember 1851. Two days later,Jason C. Pierce died at st. Johns at the
1ge of seventy-three:(67)
We regret to have to announce the demise of Jason
C. pierce,Esq.,one of the oldest and most respectable
inhabitants of St. Johns,we had almost said of this
portion of Canada. He was universally respected for
the integrity and simplicity of his character,as well
as for the performance of all of the social duties of
life.
His funeral was held on the eighth of September. The Gazette
1elpfully informed its readers that IIpersons leaving by the 12 oclock
train to attend his funeral,can return in the evening
ll
(68).
Ironically,on the same day a Pleasure Excursion to Rouses Point
left Montreal at eight in the morning and also returned the same even­
ing. This train stopped only briefly at st. Johns (69).
e :::: :::x
POSTSCRIPrUM
It is very possible that the Champlain and st. Lawrence Ra­
il Road changed the wheel arrangement of the Jason C. Pierce in
the mid-1840s from 4-2-0 to 4-4-0. Commissioner Lindsay implied as
much in a latter to M.W .Baldwin in late 1845 and the Annual Report
of the company for 1844 alluded to the cost of an extra sett(sic)
of Driving Wheels for the locomotive
ll
• Such an alteration would not
have been extraordinary for,by this time,many American railways
were successfully using the increasingly-popular 4-4-0 type loco­
motive. If the Jason C. Pierce
ll
was so altered, it would have been
the first 4-4-0 locomotive in Canada -the first of a great many.
.. . . . .
A ~Jorris 8 Cl ass loc[]mot i ve simi lar to the Jason C. Pierce, Canada I s
second locomotive as shown in a plate issued by William Norris in 1838.
P.C.Der.,hurst,an authority on Plorris engines,calls this the best of all
drawings •••• in view of it having emanated from the firm at the time when
they were actually building these engines.1
1 :l …… ,h ….. c+-D r n?7

(1)
(2)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13 )
14 )
15)
16)
CANADIAN
42
R A I L
Jason C. Pierce to George Reddington,St. Johns,28 March 1836.
This letter is in the possession of the author. It was found
wedged in an old corner cupboard and stimulated the research
for this article.
R.R.Brown,The Champlain and st. Lawrence Rallroad,Railway and
Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin No. 39,1936,citing Chief
Engineers Report of 14 December 1835,pp. 18-20.
Journals of the Legislative Aseembly,Appendix A,1843, Appoint­
ments in Lower Canada from the Division of the Province in 1791
to the Union,item 324,appointment of W.D.Lindsay,25 June 1822 •
Brown,p.17,citing Report of the Committee of Management,12 Dec.
1835.
Morning Courier (Montreal), 29 March 1836.
Gazette (Montreal), 10 May 1836.
Brown, p.17 •
The
Bulletin of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association ,
No.
3,Nov. 1937:
II
Contemporary Accounts of the Champlain and st.
Lawrence Railroad,citing the Journal of the Gilchristiana Club,
August 1836.
Brown,p.30,citing the Plattsburgh Republican.
Bro n,p.58.
Ross,Ogden
J. The Steamboats of Lake Champlain 1809-1930
~BUrlington :1930)pp.6204. The IIFranklinli was replaced by the
I Burlington in 1837 while the lIlilinooski was succeeded by the
Hhitehall
ll
in 1839. Both the Burlington and the Ivhitehall
were still in service when the Rouses Point extension was open­
ed in 1851.
Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vo1.133,Journal A (1836-45)
of the Champlain and St. Lawrence Railroad,p.l04,List of Share­
holders.
The Vindicator, 26 July 1836.
The Gazette, 30 July 1836.
~., 9 August 1836.
The
Vindicator, 9 August 1836.
CA NAD IAN R A I L
(17) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol.133. Loose expense sheet
for horse cartage, among unbound papers inserted in this journal.
(18 ) M:orning Courier, 25 August 1836 citing letter to ~he Postmaster
of Montreal,16 August 1836.
(19) The Bulletin of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association,
No. 3,November 1937,citing the Journal of the Gllchristiana
Club,August,1836.
(20) Missikoui Standard (Frelighsburg),2 November 1836.Letter
J. Chamberlin,31 October 1836.
(21) Ibid.
(22) The Vindicator, 11 September 1835.
from
(23) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol.133. Loose expense sheet in
Lindsays handwriting among unbound papers inserted in this jour­
nal.
(24) Railway & Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin No. 79,March,
1950; P.C .Dewhurst, liThe Norris Locomotive,r,citing the American
Railroad Journal,30 July 1836,p.18.
(25) Ibid.,pp. 70-1. An excellent technical explanation of Norris
lOCOmotives can be found in this article. See also Appendix I.
(26) Brown,p.62,citing letter in the files of the Champlain Trans­
portation Company (now at the University of Vermont), W.D.
Lindsay to P. Doolittle, 27 March 1837.
(27) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol.133. Lindsays expense ac­
count. See also p. 31 •
(28) !he Gazette, 20 May 1837.
(29) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol. 137,Ledger IIA p. 50.
(30) Ibid.,vol. 133,Journal IIAII, p. 1
(31) The Gazette, 1 October 1836.
(32) Public Archives of Canada, vol. 133, Journal IIAII, p. 16.
(33) Ibid.,vols. 137-9. See Appendix II.
(3lj) The Gazette, 2 IVJ8.y 1837.
(35) Ibid., 6 June 1837.
(36) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,voL 133,Journal A,p. 92.
Tripp was employed by the company on 16 May 1837. It is very
possible that he was sent to Canada wtth the Norris locomotive
CANADIAN
44
R A I L
(37) Ibid.,vol. 137,Ledger A,p. 336. For a complete account of the
locomotive engineers employed by the railroad see Appendix III.
(38) The Gazette, 14 June 1837.
(39) Missikoui standard, 27 June 1837.
(40) The Gazette, 14 September 1837. See Appendix IV.
(41) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol.137,Ledger A,page 346.
(42) ~.,vol. 133, 6 July 1838, p.187.
(43) Brown, p. 33.
(44) The Herald, 14 September 1837 citing an account written by a
traveller to the Eastern Townships, 30 August 1837.
(45) Missikoui standard, 1 August 1837. In column From the Fire­
s ide Ir.
(46) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol.133. Loose expense sheet
for horse cartage. Cartage of water for the locomotives at
13 per month comprised the major part of the bill.
:47) Journals of the Legislative Assembly,Appendix E, 184l.
:48) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol. 133, 16 December l837,p.
92. This figure does not correspond with R.R.Browns account
(P. 35),~or do any of the dividends granted in subsequent years.
49) The myth of the locomot ive Laprairie begun unwittingly hy R.
R.Brown (pp. 52-3) and later repudiated by him should now have
been buried.
50) The date 1839 seems likely for in August 1839 the company was
billed for cartage of locomotive wheels and in November the
railway paid -lard &Co. 87.3.5 for Repair. See Journal A
p. 225.
51) Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol. 3007,Letter Book 1845-49,
7 April 1847.
52) Ibid., 9 March 1846.
53) Ibid., 10 December 1845.
54) Ib id.
55) Ibid., vol. 133,Journal A. September 1845: Travelling eJC­
penses to Boston,N. York & Philadelphia, loose expense sheet
inserted in journal.
CANADIAN
45
R A I L
(56) Ibid.~ vol. 3007, 5 August 1846.
(57) Dewhurst,Appendix 9, Norris Locomotives That Were Delivered To
Canada,p. 80. It is here stated that the Champlain was built
in 1847 for the Montreal and Lachine Rail Road as the lachine
and sold in 1849 to the Champlain and st. Lawrence.JUdging from
the Journals of the Legis lat ive Assemb ly, Append ix G,1851 in
which a disbursement of£ 2000 is recorded for a New locomotive
in 1848,and the record book of Thomas Lester Dixon (Bulletin of
the Canadian Railroad Historical Association,No. 3,Nov. 1937 )
,·ho painted the locomotive in April 1849, it seems likely that
the HChamplain was acquired in 1848.
(58) Clearboard,September 1969,0.S.A.Lavallee IHll the REAL John
Molson Please steam Forward?, pp.3-7 •
(59) Canada Directory for 1851 (Montreal:John Lovell,1851),p. 574.
(60) Public Archives of Canada, RG 30, vol. 134, Journal B
II
, Mortgage
for equipment ••••.••• passed 24 Nov. 1849,p.469.
(61) ~.,22 July 1850,p. 515. See also Appendix V.
(62 )
(63 )
(64 )
Keefer in 1858 describes the Pierce as having 2 pairs of
driving wheels 46~ in diameter, (P. 91) and Dewhurst and Brown
state the conversion was completed probably in 1847 (p.80) •
Although in 1854 the Industrie railway was billed by the st.
Lambert Machine Shop for work which included ~ 66 for Tires I
and which could have been >lhen the. Pierce ,las converted, it
nevertheless seems more likely to have been done before the 10-
comot ive las sold.
Brm>ln, p. 52.
Brown, p. 53.
(65) O.S.A.Lavallee in compiling a revised roster of Canadian Pac­
ific Railway locomotives discovered company records which cast
doubt on the statement that the Jason C. Pierce was operated
by that railway.
~66) The Gazette, 6 september 1851.
:67) ~., 8 september 1851.
:68) Ibid.
:69) Ibid. Brown relates the legend that Pierce died of a broken
heart ~hen the last steamboat left st. Johns. Although there
is a germ of truth to the tale,pierce Ias an old man ~ho had
lived a full life.
CANADIAN 46 R A I L
PRIMARY SOURCES
Public Archives of Canada. Record Group 30, vols. 133-140,3007.
BOOKS
~anada Directory for 1851. Montreal: John Lovell,1851.
Journals of the Legislative Assembly.
Keefer, samuel. Report on the Rall1ays of Canada for 1858.
~oss, Ogden J. The Steamboats of Lake Champlain 1809-1930.
Burlington: 1930.
~hite, John H. Jr.American Locomotives: An Engineering History 1830-
1880
RTICLES
3rown, R .R.
)ewhurst, P .C •
Baltimore: 1968.
The Champlain and st. Lawrence Railroad,
Raih1ay and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin,
39,1936.
Contemporary Accounts of the Champlain and St .La~I­
rence Railroad
Bulletin of the Canadian Railroad Historical Asso­
ciation, 3, Nov. 1937.
The Norris Locomotive~
Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin,
79, Mar. 1950 •
.avallee, O.S.A. Will the REAL John Molson Please steam Forward?
Clearboard, sept. 1969.
mrSPAPERS
[ontreal: The Gazette
The Herald
La Minerve
The Morning Courier
The Vind icator
Frelighsburg: Missikoui Standard
Plattsburgh : The Republican
CANADIAN
47
APPENDIX I
THE JASON C. PIERCE LOCOMOTIVE
Particulars
Class
Wheel Arrangement
Diameter of cylinders
Piston strol<;:e
Length of boiler
Length of tubes
Number of tubes
Diameter of tubes
Diameter of chimney
Height of chimney
Source: P.O .Dewhurst
The Norris Locomotive
R.& L.H.S.Bulletin 79
p. 76
B
4-2-0
10~
18
13 8
1
78
2
(+)
101
6
1
Diameter of driving wheels 48
Diameter of truck wheels 30
vleight of locomotive 20,615 Ibs.
R A I L
Source: The Report of
Samuel Keefer ••••••••
for 1858,p. 90.
4-4-0
lOot
20
7~
94
I!
46~
12 T.
(+) The original 2 tubes were replaced by the Champlain and
st. Lawrence in the early 1840s.
Note: In the winter of 1846-47 the locomotive was fitted with
a Friench & Baird (sic) smoke pipe and a locomotive
lamp.
Ref.Public Archives of Canada,RG 30,vol. 3007,5 August
1846.
• ••••
The working replica of the ~Iorris B Type 4-2-0 LAFAYETTE of the Balti­
more and Ohio Railroad. This replica appeared operating under its own
power at th.e Fair of the Iron Horse in Chicago. Ill.. in 1949.
Photo courtesy Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.
. . .,
.. . ..
• • •

CANADIAN
49
R A I L
APPENDIX II
JASON C. PIERCE & SON
ACCOUNT WITH
THE CHAMPLAIN AND sr. LAWRENCE
Year
~.
s d Balance owing Annual Totals
1836 1579 9 0 1579 9 0
1837 1351 6 0
1351 6 0 1838
1630 18 6 431 14 3
1199 4 3
1839 2472 1L~
9 892 2 5
1580 12 4
1840 1657 9 7 767 11 0 889 18 7
1841 1334
5 4 255 16 0 1078
9 4
1842 831 14 7 560 17 4 270 17 3 1843 638
19 3 234 15 9 404 3 6 1844 589 7 1
589 7 1
1845 875 3 6 412 14 6 462
9 0
1846 1414 18 0 103 0 0
1311 18 0 1847
1352 12 7
1352 12
7 1848
1948
9 0 199 14 3
1748 14
9
1849 2312 18 6
2312 18 6
1850 2082 19 3 2082 19 3
1851
1730 16 10
1730 16 10
Total:
;J; 19945 16 3
Source: Public Archives of Canada,vo1s. 137-9,Ledgers A, B & C.
APPENDIX V
sr. LAWRENCE AND INDUSTRIE
SCHEDULES 1850
Leave Industrie Leave Lanoraie
May 13: 8 1 5 11
3 7
Aug.
5 : 6x 12 5
.2.
2 7
I
x -Monday and Thursday only
Source: La Minerve (Montreal), 1850.
LOCOMOTIVE
ENGINEERS
EMPLOYED
BY
THE
CHAMPLAIN
AND
ST.
LAWRENCE
RAILROAD
Date
work
began
Name
1836
(2
Aug.)
H.
Boughton
1837
(16
May) Lewis
Tripp
1839
(5
June)
J.
Hazleton
Date
work
terminated 1837
(10
Aug.)
1838
(6
Dec.
)
1844
(1
July)
Remarks
Reference
locomotive
engineer
We
are
glad
to
learn
that
the
locomotive
engine
is
now
in
op­
erat
ion
on
the
st.
Ledger
A,
p.336.
Montreal
Gazette
August
9,1836.
Johns
Railroad.The
new
engineer
has
given
it
an
examination
and made
a
trial
of
its
speed
yesterday.
II
tlBy
the
bye,
the
engineer,
Journal
of
Gil­
an
American,
is
as
cool
a
christiana
Club
fellow
as
we
have
seen
in
Bulletin
of
some
time.
He
did
not
ap-
The
Canadian
Rail­
pear
in
the
lease
degree
road
Historical
As­
disconcerted
nor
seem
to
sociation,No.
3,
lose
any
of
his
stock
of
Nov.
1937.
self-possession,
not
llith-
standing
the
accidents
and
delays
we
met
with
and he
gave
evidence
of
understan-
ding
his
profession
thorou-
ghly.

Engineer
for
the
year
1838.
Ledger
A,
p.
346.
Eng1.ncer
ll
Jou
rnal
A,
p
.162
.
Journal
A,p.
567.
Ledger
A
,p.
355.
Ledger
A
,p.
367.
No
record
of
the
Engineer
employed
by
the
Company
from
1844
to
1846,but
it
was
likely
George
pangborn.
1846 Geo.
Pangburn
(sic)
,

1852
(Apr.)
1854 Geo.
Pangborn
After
the
introduction
of
a
new
ledger
and
jour­
nal
in
1846,employees
were
no
longer
listed
by
occupat
ion.
Inscription
on
watch:
presented
to
Mr. George
W.
Pangborn,Engr
as
a
token
of
esteem
after
13
years
connection
with
the
C
&
st.
L
R.Rd.
From
several
employees
of
said
line.
Apr.
20,1852.
This
would
date
Pangborns
earliest
connection
with
the
rail­
road

not
necessarily
as
engineer

as
April,1840.
Returned
to
the
C
&
st.L
after
two
years
work on
the
st.
Lawrence
&
Atlantic.
Journal
B-loose
sheet
Ledger
B,
p.619.
Lucien
Brault,Le
Premier
Chemin de
Fer
au
Canada,
Typewritten
ms.
(Ottawa;
Public
Archives
of
Can­
ada,1937),p.5
4•
Watch owned
(1937)
by
Mr. E.J.W
.Pan­
gborn
of
Colton,
California.
Ibid.
The
following
were
listed
as
lI
eng
ineers
in
the
Canada
Directory
of
,gl57:
st.
Johns
Pierre
Monbleau
Jos.
Tremblay
Longueuil Romuald
Cinqmars
st.
Lambert
Pierre
Boivin
Pierre
Latulippe
George
Pangborn
Daniel
Salt
Rouses
Point
Not
included
CANADIAN
52
R A I L
APPENDIX N
CHAMPLAlN AND ST. LAVlRENCE RAILROAD
SCHEDULES 1836-1851
DATE SOUTHBOUND NORTHBOUND
Fy lv Mtl Loco lv Lap Str str Loco lv stJ Fy lv Lap
lv ar
st.J st. J
1836
Jlil23 8 2 5 2 6 10 6 7 2 6
9
4
Sep 1
9
1 4~ 10
3t 5~
10
·b
9 2 blOt 3
Oct 4 9 12~ 4 10
21-
5X 9 1~ ~ 10~ 2~ 2
28
-.l..
3 10~ 4
-1
Oct
22 22 I
11
1837
May 2 2 4 10
5 1 6 9 6~ 10~
Jun 14y 9 1 5 10 3 6 1
b
5 9
2 b 10~ 3
Sep 14
9 12t 4 10
5 1
1)
9
I bt 10~ 2t
Nov 1 91-
3 10~ 4
-1
I 11 _2 22
1838
May 24
9
1 5 10
5 12i 6
9 li 6 lOt 3
Sep
7
2:
12t 4 10
5 12f b
2:
1
p. 101. 21-
_2 _2 2
1840
Ji:ii111 9 1 5 10 6 1
9
1.2-
6 10~ 3
4
Aug 27
2
12~ 4 10
5 1
2:
1 :§:~ 10~ 2~
1842
May 12
2-
1 5 10 6 2 1.2-
4
6 10.1 3
_4
1850
Aiir18 12
5
1.1
6} 8 12
9 2~
4
May 6 6 10 12 4t
2~ 11i 2~ 5i 2~ 2t I 3~
-1-
12i 4~ 6 s12 5t 72
Jul 22 b 10 12 5
2~ 11t 3 5i g~ 2~ I 3~ 7~ li 4~ b Bl 2i 6
Sep 30 b 9I 11 4~ 9
10–
1~ 5f
b 7~ 12 2i b 9~ 11 4t
_4
Nov 21 -:2l11t 3~
2:
loi 1~ 5i
b n 12 2i-
§l 1l~3~
1851
Jul 12 4 8 11
5
5.1 10
_4 _ 12i 6~ 6 2 611
I
8 11~4 6 8 12~ 6~
X-by horses Y-To have gone into effect 23 May 2-11 Sept. Rouses
pt .line opened.
Source: The Gazette (l.fontreal), 1836-51
Underlined times are A.M.
:F-:Fl. <> 1Y.I:
O.A..1V .A.. X> I .A..1V :Fl. .A.. I :L.41
Fl.~ .A.. X> ~:Fl. S
From Sudbury,Ont.,Mr. Dale Wilson sends us some comments on
THE WAY IT USED TO BE -(C.R. 226,November,1970):
The ACR owned 17 mikados in all. None of them was new
and all were apparently acquired during World War II.
No. 61 was formerly Wabash Railroad no. 2412. Engine
no. 103 _. page 321 -was a 4-6-0.
Can anyone provide additional information on the sp­
ecial train pictured on the inside back cover? The
date is somewhat earlier than 1948. The herald on the
tender incorporates the bear. Does this help to fix
the date?
The Algoma Eastern Railway,which ran in the same gen­
eral area, was finally acquired by the Canadian Pac­
ific Railway. AER no. 51 became CPR 3051. Can anyone
tell me when this engine was scrapped?
Mr. Duncan duFresne of Ottawa has examined the photograph of
Algoma Centrals no. 103 on page 321 carefully and writes:
The ACR engine no. 103 on page 321 is a 4-6-0 and not
a 4-6-2. Careful examination also seems to indicate
that it is almost the same as -if not exactly sim­
ilar to -Canadian Pacifics famous D-10 design. How
is it possible that an ACR engine would be built to
a CPR design?
Referring to the article Across Niagaras Gorge in the
)ctober,1970 issue of CANADIAN RAIL (NO. 225),the following comments
~ave been received from Mr. Eric Johnson of Calgary,Alta.:
The legend of the boy flying the kite across the Gorge
for Mr. Ellett was actually a fact. The boy who won the
$ 5 prize was Mr. Homan Walsh, who was also the first
man to cross over the Gorge on Elletts cableway on
March
13,1848.
Mr. Johnsons source is the book BUILDERS OF THE BRIDGE, by
).B.Steinman,the biographer of John A. Roebling and of his son,Was~
lngton. Mr. vlalsh,the boy hero,later lived in Lincoln,Nebraska and
lsed proudly to recite this exploit.
Mr. Johnson would appreciate receiving information on the
Baguley Petrol-hydraulic rail-car,delivered in 1913 to the Lacombe
ind
Blindman Valley Railway in Alberta. This vehicle appears to have
Jeen the first of its kind fitted with a hydraulic transmission. Mr.
Johnson would also like to obtain information on and photographs of
~he Edmonton Interurban Railway of about the same date (1913). He
nay be addressed c/o Department of Mechnaical Engineering,University
)f Calgary,Calgary,Alta.
CENTENNIAL SPIN-OFF – – – –
On April 15,1970,the Winnipeg FREE PRESS Headlined the happy news
that the venerable Countess of Dufferin had left her trad it ional
podium on Higgins Street, in front of CP RAILs Winnipeg, Manitoba
station for Weston Shops, where she was to receive a face lifting.
Footing the bill,as a Manitoba Centennial 70 Project, is James
Richardson & Sons, Limited. Ultimate rejuvenation destined the an­
cient Countess for the Transportation Section of the new Museum
of Man and Nature,but when the beauty treatment was complete, the
Museum was unfortunately not ready to receive this historic display.
However,an alternate location was subsequently selected where the
Countess could be exhibited until the final position in the Mus­
eum is ready. Total cost of the refurb ishment was originally fore­
cast at $ 15,000,but it is said that the final cost was in excess
of that sum. It is reassuring to know that after a brief interval
of only 60 years, the matriarch has been restored and will be placed
in a position of honor,which,after all, is only proper.
NO WIRES IN WINNIPEG – – – –
7.15 p.m.,October 30,1970 (Friday),marked the last run of a trolley
bus in Greater Winnipeg,when the slitch at Winnipeg Hydros Mill
Street Substatior. was opened,permanently cutting off power to the
wires of the trolley bus system.The final run was made on North Main
Street and Carruthers Avenue. Trolley bus operation fun Winnipeg be­
gan thirty-two years ago on November 21,1938,when a fleet of six ve­
hicles replaced the street cars on the Sargent Avenue route. This
was the first trolley bus service to operate in western Canada.This
initial group of trolley buses was added to steadily until a peak
number of 162 was reached in the period from 1956 to 1959.
The early trolley buses were Pullman-Standard and Mack,manufactured
in the United States. A single unit was built by Motor Coach Indus­
tries,Limited of Winnipeg, but the experiment was not economically
successful. A large number vere bought from the Canadian Car & Foun­
dry Company of Fort William,Ontario -Brill types. The last twen­
ty-eight trolley buses added to the fleet were purchased second­
hand: eighteen Pullman-Standards coming from Providence,Rhode Is-
land, U.S.A. and ten American Car & Foundry Brills from Flint,
Michigan, U.S.A.
As electric energy rates rose and the cost of installation and ma­
intenance of overhead wiring increased,these trolley buses lost fa­
vor with a large number of trans1t operators. This type of vehicle,
moreover,did not permit the same flexibility in operation as gas­
oline and diesel-powered buses, which were being improved in design
CANADIAN
55
R A I L
and had larger carrying capacities. This swing to internal combus­
tion-powered buses soon brought trolley bus manufacture to an end.
Parts became difficult to obtain and expensive to purchase, due to
the increasing age of the vehicles in service and the small jemand
for these specialized parts. Later on, overhead wiring became un­
acceptable to Metro Winnipegs city planning board.
With the elimination of the trolley buses in Winnipeg, traffic will
be handled by a fleet of 500 buses. However,the reputation of the
Trolley Bus for dependability may result in attempts to eliminate
its less desirable features in an effort to regain its popularity.
At least one other canadian city,Toronto,is interesting in its
continuing retention of this mode of urban transport. Meanwhile,
Montreals METRO system uses electrically-driven,rubber-tyred tr­
ains which,in effect,are stretched trolley buses. So this con­
cept of a mass transportation vehicle will live on, even though the
days (and nights) of the trolley bus,as we know it,have come to an
end in Greater Winnipeg.
NEl CABOOSES FOR CP RAIL –
Towards
the end of 1970,CP RAIL began building 50 new cabooses at
Angus Shops,Montreal. These ne~ vans w111 be equipped with the most
modern
facilities, including electric lights,oil heaters and other
accessories. Exteriorally,the new cabooses will be bright yellow
with red doors and black-and-white MULTIMARKS. This colour scheme
has not been applied to any wooden cabooses yet, but at least one was
painted latterly in the colours formerly used on long distance st­
eel cabooses: bight red sides and yellow ends,with white script let­
tering.
HETRO-MONTREALS MEANDERINGS – – –
Last Autumn,plans were revealed for a ten-year programme of exten­
sions to Montreals METRO system, to bring its total length to 40
miles. Hork is expected to begin this year with the first phase to
be ready to receive passengers in 1974. Line 1 -ATWATER-FRONTENAC
will be lengthened at both ends to serve the northeast and south­
vest urban areas, including Maisonneuve, the Olympic Games site, Te­
treauville,St-Leonard and Hontreal-Nord,as well as St-Henri, C6te­
St-Paul and Verdun. Line 2 -HENRI BOURASSA-BONAVENTURE -will be
exrended southwest and west to Notre-Dame-de-Grace,Snowdon and (ev­
entually) St-Laurent,forming a u-shaped route.
The two extensions lill cross in the St-Henri area and an­
other transfer station, like that at Berri-de Montigny,N111 be built.
A nev crosstown line will be constructed subsequently to cross the
arms of the U formed by the extended Line 2 on a route near Jean
Talon Street. The whole will be a MUCTUC product ion •
• • •
Bob Loat of Calgary,Alta. sends us this picture of CNR Plow Extra 4223
near Calgary,Alta. on January 7,1967.
CANADIAN RAIL
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Copyright 1970 Printed in Canada on Canadian paper.

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