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Canadian Rail 228 1971

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Canadian Rail 228 1971

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IVO.228
:1.971

L OCIE S FOR LOGGERS
by
John Hoffmeister.
Editor1s note: Mr. Hoffmesiters article vlaS written late in 1969
for CANADIAN RAIL. Some changes in the disposition
of the locomotives mentioned may have taken place
s 1r.ce that time.
r Not so very long ago, the song of the Sh.ay
could be heard in nearly every mountain
valley along North America1s Pacific Coa­
st,from British Columbia to California.
Railroad 10gg:Lng, in Canada, centred chief­
ly in British Columbia and las most im­
portant on Vancouver Island and along the
southwestern coast of the mainland .Today,
three logging railroads are still active
on Vancouver Island,which once boasted a
total of nearly 2,000 miles of railroad,
built and torn up in varying amounts over
a 60-year period.
One Company, the Comox Logging and Railway Company Limited,operated
over 900 miles of logging railway in the Courtenay and Nanaimo La­
kes regions. Most of that vast mileage consisted of temporary spur
lines which vanished after short periods of intense use. Today,
unde r Crown-Ze lIe rbach Corporation ownership,Comox I s Baldwin die-
sel still trundles loads 23.5 miles from Nanaimo Lakes to Lady-
smith,Vancouver Island,over an immaculate roadbed. But in the
d?ys of steam-hauled logging trains, the motive power was affect­
ionately known, regardless of size or wheel-arrangement,as the old
111
0c
ie It •
Vancouver Island1s logging railways boasted the only two
mallet
lt
logging-railroad locomotives in Canada. The abandoned Mac-
millan and Bloedel Railroad show at Franklin River on the west
coast of the Alberni Canal stabled Baldwin 2-6-6-2T no. 1006,whd:ch
carne from Saginaw Logging at Brooklyn, l-Jashington. Canad ian Forest
Products immense 100-mile long line,from Beaver Cove, bragged
about no. lll,a 2-6-6-2 Baldwin which originally served on the
Vail,IVashington line of the veyerhauser, Incorporated operation .
Unfortunately,these locies were both scrapped in the early 160
1
s.
WHAT COULD BE MORE APPROpRIATE FOR THE COVER THAN THIS PHOTO OF FIREMAN
Fred Lawes,looking back along MacMillan Bloedel no. 105515 train,winding
around the curves on the way to tidewater. Photo MacMillan Bloedel Limited.
2,000 TONS OF LOGS ON 30 LOGGING BUNKS TRUNDLE ACROSS THE TRESTLE BEHIND
M&BIs no. 1055 on the way to Ladysmith,Vancouver Island,B.C. Originally
ox-teams were used for hauling the logs,but by 1917,there were 62 logging
railways in Canada1s west coast province using 410 miles of track,98 lo­
comotives and 1,295 cars. By 1948,there were only 16 lines left and the
end of the steam locie was in sight. Two-and-a-half hours later, the
last trip of no. 1055 was completed. Photo courtesy MacMillan Bloedel.
CANADIAN
4
R A I L
In the heyday of railroad logging,the empty train was run
right to the end of the spur in the woods,where the loader placed
the logs on the waiting flats or sometimes on the sets of paired,
unconnected trucks,known as disconnects. After the train was
loaded and the cars of logs on trucks were coupled up,the train
started its descent through the woods over tortuous grades,behind
a bubbling rod-engine,or more commonly,a thrashing geared locie •
The
end of the line was always either a sawmill or a dump,where
the logs were tumbled off the disconnects into water,for subse­
quent tug-towing to a distant mill. Hhile the typical main line
from the woods to the terminus sported heavy rail and adequate
ballasting,the temporary woods spurs were laid with second-hand
rail,which was used continuously until it was too far gone for
any further purpose. Grading and ballasting on the spurs varied
from little to none. The versatile Shay locomotive found the wi­
dest acceptance with the smaller logging outfits.
The Shay locomotive was the original type of geared engine.
Two,or more commonly three cylinders,positioned vertically on the
right side of the bOiler,transmitted power vertically to a long­
itudinal drive-shaft,running along the right side of the locomo­
tive. By means of notched pinion gears,the drive-shaft powered
each axle of the two or three trucks,through corresponding gears
on the right wheel faces of the axles. To compensate for the pla­
cement of the cylinders, the engine boiler was offset slightly to
the left,thus balancing the weight evenly. A Shay,cranking upgrade
in the woods,produced a rapid,cracking,shotgun-like exhaust, often
creating very misleadingly the -sound of a speeding engine. As one
oldtimer remarked, fifteen per is about it, -although she might do
fifty -over the side of a trestle,depending on how high it is!
Next most popular of the geared variety -the Climax,spor­
ted a set of cylinders on each flank of the boiler. Unlike the
cylinders of the Shay, the Climaxs cylinders worked in the same
direction as the locomotive moved. A series of reduction gears
from the cylinder crankshafts powered the central drive-shaft,run­
ning amidships down the frame of the locomotive. Through fur­
ther gearing, the drive-shaft powered each axle of each truck, in
turn.
Last but by no means least in the family, came the Heisler,
which was a sort of combination of the Shay and the Climax. These
locomotives had a v-shaped engine,mounted laterally just in front
of the cab. The pistons worked at right-angles to the direction of
motion and powered a central drive-shaft,as in the Climax. One
axle of a two-axled truck was usually driven by the central drive­
shaft and consequently the truck wheels were siderodded,giving the
engine the appearance of being a rod-engine.
In terms of tractive effort,the Climax probably proved the
most powerful of the three,although the thrashing piston rods had
a tendancy to set up terrific vibrations, which the crews general­
ly disliked.
Conventional rod engines came in every size and wheel –
arrangement, from vest -pocket o-4-OT s to giant mallet art ic ulateds.
Saddle and side-tanks, located over the driving wheels,served not
CANADIAN
5
R A I L
only the obvious purpose but also increased the tractive force,by
the additional weight they added to the drivers. For main line ha­
uling,the larger companies such as Alberni pacific,Elk River Tim­
ber,Comox Logging & Railway and Canadian Forest Products, stabled
oil-fired 2-B-2s on their properties.
By the early 1940s, the end of most of these lines was in
sight. One by one,the logging railroads disappeared from the Is­
land. The reasons for abandonment were varied. Ageing motive pow­
er needed replacement,but the heavier axle-loadings of the dies­
els required a more substantial roadbed than most of the o~tfits
had. Another reason was that the timberlands served by the rail
netlOrks had been logged out. Reluctantly,British Columbia Forest
Products wour.d up their railroading operatior. at Port Renfrew, on
Vancouver Islands west coast,in 195B.
No longer did the Shays snake their long trains of skel­
eton flats down the San Juan River valley. Hhen it was allover
Pacific Coast Shays numbers 17 and 19 were cut up where they st­
ood. Canadian Forest Products and Comox Logging invested in die­
sels,while Macmillan & Bloedel stayed ,lith steam at Nanaimo Riv­
er. Even today,a main line rail-haul of more than 20 miles proves
more efficient than a road-truck operation. The maintenance and
appealance of the C.F.P. and Comox track puts that of the other
two common carriers on the Island in the deep shade.
On August 20, 196B.Harry Hright cracked the throttle on
3-truck Climax no. 10 of the Hillcrest Lumber Company at Mesachie
Lake,22 miles lest of DW1can,for the last revenue trip over the
7.5 mi_les of private short-line mill railroad. lith the demise of
all other Climax-operated runs, the Hillcrest line had become fam­
ous. Although Hillcrest ceased operation of railroad logging, as
such, :i_n the late 40 s, the Company cont inued the ir short oper-·
ation between the Esquimault & Nanaimo interchange at Cowichan
Lake and the huge Hestern Forest Industries mill at Honeymoon Bay.
The last ten years witnessed a decline from daily operation tb
twice or three times a week. It was usual practice for the little
2-truck Climax no. 9 to remain on standby to the no. 10. Remark­
ably, through the i_nterest and concern of the owners of the oper­
ation,the Stone family,the entire Hillcrest roster of four locies
survives intact. No.1, a 2-truck Shay and no. 2,a Climax, may be
seen today,preserved at the Cowichan Valley Forest Museum,at Dun­
can,40 miles north of Victoria, on Vancouver Island. Pacific Coa­
st-tjTe Shay,no. 11 was sold to Canadian Forest Products as their
no. 115 and after,iards C.F.P. sold the locie to Mr. Robert E.Swan­
son, for use in North Vancouver, where she is today, in company with
no. 114,ex-I!estern Forest Products no. 5. Hillcrests no. 10 has
recently been sold to private interests in Vancouver for a pro­
posed excursion raihlay service in nearby Lulu Island.
The huge l~:lcmillan-Bloede 1 mill at Chemalnus,50 miles nor­
th of Victoria, is served by its ovm mill railway. Log cars arri­
ving from the Companys Nanaimo River camp are nursed down an in­
credibly steep switchback, by either a Porter 2-6-2T,no. 10lflf, or a
Baldwin 2-B-2T,no. 1066. No, 1044,the prettier of the pair,is pre-
CANADIAN
6
R A I L
ferred,since she is easier on the rail. Recently,the possibility
arose of moving no. 1066 to the Nanatmo River camp, tn the event
that a planned 4 to 12-mile extension of the logging railway sh­
ould be made there. Next summer, the easiest way to see this locie
if she is still working, is to continue south past the mill at Che­
mainus,thence turning east on the Halstead Road.
Seven miles north of Chemainus lies Ladysmith, terminus of
both the Comox Logging and Railway Company and another Macmillan­
Bloedel line. Actually,both companies use the same track as far as
Nanaimo River Junction,17 mtles northwest of Ladysmith. Comox cur­
rently hauls from the Nanaimo Lakes reload, uSing an ancient Bald­
win VOIi diesel-switcher. Under load, you can actually watch each
of the six cylinders of the diesel engine firing individually, with
smoke-rings made to order! Recent1y,some thouV1t has been given to
removing Comox 2-8-2,no. ll,off the display block at the lady­
smith Arboretum, where she is presently on vj.ew and returning her
to active service. The Company dieselized wit11 the second-hand
Baldwin in December, 1960, primarily because of the greater hauling
power of the diesel.
Macmillan-Bloedel stable Baldwin 2-8-2T,no. 1055 in the
engine shed at Nanaimo River Camp,together …. Iith a very lovely Mon­
treal Locomotive Horks 2-6-2,no. 1077. The 1077 is unique, being
the only survivor in Canada of the prairie II type, built by a
Canadian builder. During 1968,the Company spent nearly $ ~O,OOO in
first-class overhauls on nos. 1044,the Porter and 1055.
Presently,Macmil1an-Bloedel trains leave the Camp at ~.OO
a.m. and 12.30 p.m.,with one of the locies hauling the turn to the
Ladysmith interchange with the Esquimault & Nanaimo. The run takes
a little better than 1 hour,each Tay. The· Comox Logging tratn de­
parts from Ladysmith around 9.00 a.m.,arriving back about 2.00 p.
m. You can get a lovely picture of the logger by driving 4 miles
north of Ladysmith on Highway No.1 (TransCanada).Then turn left
on the Timberland road,cross the E. & N. and continue half-a-mtle
further to the logging railway line. An easy, short walk north a­
long the grade will bring you to Haslam Creek Trestle,an excel­
lent site for an even better sight!
Northern vancouver Island,which is more rugged than the
southern part and exceptionally scenic,boasts standby steam on two
operations. Crown-Zellerbach1s Elk Falls Division at Campbell Riv­
er employs eX-Comox Logging no. 15,a 2-truck Shay,to bat box and
chemical cars about the huge pulp mill. At least once a week,when
traffic proves to be too heavy, she replaces the tiny side-rodded
Whitcomb gas locomotive. Hhen you visit this area,an excellent in­
dustrial tour. may be taken at Crown-2e llerbach I s mill.
Almost at the extreme northern tip of vancouver ISland
lies Beaver Cove, tidewater terminus of the giant Canadian Forest
Products railway. The main line to the back of the timber limit
at Schoen and Klaklakama Lakes is an 80-mile run, laid with 100 –
pound
or better steel. Three GM sw-type,dynamic-braked,yellow and
black diesels normally handle the trains,which often mana~ to
total 75 to 100 accumulated cars. In periods of high production,
ALCO 2-8-2 no. 113 gets into the act,as well. This aesthetically-
CANADIAN
7
R A I L
sat isfying and we ll-kept loc ie came north from Ore gon s Port land,
Astoria & pacific Rail~ay. Durtng the summer of 1968, she pilote,d
tourists from the main camp at Woss to a 1ew recreational area,
seve ral mile s d own the line.
However,the uniqueness of Canadian Forest Products oper­
ation resides in two geared oddities that still see periodic use.
Some ttme back,~hen an ageing 2-truck Climax and a rundown Shay
had steamed their last,their boilers were cast aside and diesel­
equipped car-bodies were positioned on their geared frames, making
a most peculiar result. At .loss Camp, one may also see a squat Por­
ter 2-6-2T,no. 116,on open display. Canadian Forest Products in­
teresting show can be reached by road from Campbell River, or by
car-ferry from Kelsey Bay,but one should secure permission from
the Company at Campbell River,before setting out to inspect this
intriguing operation. There is some sensitivity, since acute vandal-
ism to a stored locie,several years back, forced the Company to
~crap her.
Nearer to the Provinces largest city,at North vancouver,
Vctncouver Wharves sees the operation of two Pacific Coast-type
Shays. A more detailed report on these two locomotives is an-
ticipated in the pages of this magazine,so it is sufficient to say
that they are still operating in the sun~r of 1968.
Finally,it should be mentioned that those locies that are
still running should continue to do so for several years to come.
A
roster of those operating and some retired and displayed side­
kicks concludes this article.
CANADIAN FOREST PRODUCTS COMPANY, Beaver Cove,V.I.,B.C.
113 2-8-2
116 2-6-2T
251 2-truck
Shay
252 2-truck
Climax
253 0-4-0
gas
301 SH
302 ST,~
303 mv
ALCO c/n 61859 1920
Porter c/n 6821 1924
LIl-1A
Canadian Forest Products
G€neral
141:l29
G.M.D.
G.M.D.
Motors
1956
14CJ30
14831
Diesel
1956
1956
On standby;
ex P.A.& P.,no. 102
Alberni pacific no.6
l-1acmillan-Bloedel 1st.
no.1055
On display at Woss Camp;
ex Powell River Company
Salmon River Logging
no. 4
Rebuilt 1951 by Tyee
Machinery to diesel­
Shay.
Rebuilt by Canadian For­
est Products to d iesel­
Climax.
1,200 hp.
1,200 hp.
1,200 hp.

CANADIAN
10
R A I L
COMOX LOGGING AND RAILWAY CO.;Nanaimo Lakes & Campbell River,B.C.
2 2-6-2T BALnvIN c/n 34921 1910 On display at Tourist In-
7
11
12
15
2-6-2 BA LDil IN
2-8-2 BALDHIN c/n 57409 1924
2-truck LIMA c/n 3311 1927
Shay
2-truck LIMA c/n 3289 19
25
Sh
ay
16 2-8-2 BALDWIN c/n 61159 1929
7128 VO BAIDlIN 1943
diesel
formation Centre,Courte­
nay,B.C.
ex Canad ian i-leste rn Lum­
ber no. 2
On display at Squamish,B.
C.,under combined name
of pacific Great East­
ern-Crown Zellerbach.
ex P.G.E.no. 2.
On display at Arboretum,
Ladysmitll,V .I.,B.C.
ex Donovan-Corkery no. 4.
On display at Arboretum,
Ladysmith, V .I.,B.C.
ex Squamish Timber no. 2.
In service in 1968 at Elk
Falls mill,Campbell
River, V .I oB.C.
ex Merril-Ring Lumber Co.
Donated to Hest Coast Ra­
ilfans Association,Van­
couver,B.C.
In 1967,operated on Al­
aska Railroad,Anchor~
age,Alaska.
ex C.R.McCormick no. 101.
In service 1968,Ladysmith
V.I.,B.C.
ex United States Navy.
COHICHAN VALLEY FOREST MUSE~,Duncan, V.I B .C.
Operational engines:
1 2-truck LIMA c/n 3147
Shay
24 0-4-OT
25 0-4-OT
(none) o-4~0
gas
VULCAN
KINGSTON
PLYMOUIH
1920
——-
Converted from standard
to 36-gauge in 1964.
ex Osborne Bay Hharf Co.l
Hillcrest Lumber,no. 1
36 gauge; narred SUSIE.
36 gauge; barred SAMSON.
36 gauge ;named SANDY.
PROBABLY THE MOST THOROUGHLY ATMOSPHERIC PORTRAYAL OF MACMILLAN BLOEOEL
no. 1055,as she winds her train down the 16-mile line from the Companys
logging limits to the shores of the Strait of Georgia,1,000 feet below.
Photo courtesy MacMillan Bloedel Limited.
THE LAST ACT FOR MACMILLAN BLOEOELS NO. 1055 was on Monday,December 1,
1969,when Engineer Peter McGovern and Fireman Fred Lawes brought the
last logging train out of the luoods. This was the conclusion of 41 years
of faithful service in the forests of Vancouver Island.
CANADIAN 11 R A I L
Displayed engines:
1 2-truck LIMA c/n 247~ 1911 OWned by Mr. G. Wellburn
ex Mcmillan-Bloedel no.l.
First superheated Shay in
British Columbia; donated
to C.V.F.M. by Mayo Lum­
ber Co.,Paldi,B.C.
Shay
3 2-truck LIMA c/n 3262 1924
9
Shay
2-truck
Climax
CLIMAX
ex Mayo Lumber Co. no.3.
c/n 1359 1915 Donated to C.V.F.M. by
Hillcrest Lumber Co. ,
April, 1967.
ex M.D.Olds,Michigan,U.S.
(Cowichan Valley Forest
ough September of each
Hillcrest Lumber Co.44
Hillcrest Lumber Co. 9
Museum is open to the public from May thr­
year. Information available on request.)
HILLCREST LUMBER COMPANY,Mesachie Lake, V .1.,B.C. (Operation closed)
10 3-truck
Climax
CLIMAX c/n 1693 1928 Purchased new by Hillcrest.
Sold to private interests
in February,1969,0~ Van­
couver,B.C.
MACMILIAN-BLOEDEL LTh1ITED,Chemainus and Nanaimo, V .1.,B.C.
2
1011
1012
1044
1055
1066
1077
2-truck LIMA
Shay
On open display, Port Al­
berni,B.C.
(diesel) General Electric.
c/n 29956 1949
380 hp.In use at Harmac Pulp Div­
iSion,Nanaimo,B.C.
(diesel)
2-6-2T
2-8-2T
2-8-2T
2-6-2
ex Nanaimo Sulphate & Pulp
no. 1
General Electric 600 hp.In use at mill, Port Al-
c/n 29951 1948 berni,V.I.,B.C.
ex P.G.E. DO. 551.
PORTER c/n 6877 1924 In use at mill,Che-
BALDWIN c/n 60942 1929
BALDIIIN c/n 58687 1925
MONlREAL Loco. Horks
c/n 65337 1923
mainus,V.I.,B.C.
ex Victoria Lumber no. 4
Timberland no. 4
In service on log run at
Nanaimo River Camp,V.I.
ex Campbell River Timber 2
Macmillan-Bloedel 1007
On standby to no. 1044 at
Chemainus, V .1.,13 .C •
ex Bloedel,Stewart & Hel­
ch,no. 4.
In service on log run at
Nanaimo River Camp,V.I.
ex Victorta Lumber,2nd.no.7
cathel & Sorenson no.l.

CANADIAN
4012 0-6-0 LIMA
14
R A I L
Sold in 1964 to Dr. P.dEs­
trube,Victoria,B.C.
Stored on own spur at Na­
naimo Camp, V
.1 .,B.C.
ex Pacific Coast Terminals
no. 4012.
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST PRODUCTS,Victoria & Crofton.V.I..B.C.
9
(d iese 1) GENERAL ELECTRIC
(1 ) steam-(unkno .. m)
crane
VANCOUVER WHARVES LIMITED,Vancouver,B.C.
114
3-truck LIMA cln 3320 1928
Shay
115
3-truck LIMA cln 3350 1930
Shay
——-
In
In
In
ex
In
ex
use at mill at Crofton,
V .I.,B.C. Centre-cab
unit.
use in drying yard, Vic-
toria Mill,Victoria,
B.C •.
service,1969.
Mayo Lumber Co. 4
Western Forest Pro­
ducts no. 5 .
service 1969.
Canadian Forest Produc­
ts no. 115
Hillcrest Lumber no. 11.
IN THE SPRING OF 1969,HILLCREST LUMBER COMPANY of Mesachie Lake,Vancouver
Island,B.C.,absndoned the last of its railroad· and Climax no. 10, shown
here crossing Robertson River,became redundant. By June,it was reported
that No. 10 had been sold to Mr. Terry Fergusson,e Vancouver student,who
planned to operate the 41-year old locie as a tourist attraction. This
excellent photo was taken by Doug Cummings of Vancouver,B.C.
Pa~ific Coast Shay no. 5 of Western Forest Industries relaxes along with
0-6-0 Cummins diesel no. 7 at the Honeymoon Bay mill. No. 5 was sold in
1965 to Robert Swanson, for use on the Vancouver Wharves Railway at North
Vancouver,where she runs today ae Railway Appliance Research Limited No.
114. Photo by John Hoffmeister.
Nameless and numberless,MacMillan Bloedel & Powell River 2-8-2T no. 1066
has just finished a days work around the Chemainus Mill. Six years after
being caught on film,the little pot still relieves 2-6-2T no. 1044 when
the letter is laid up for repairs. Over her numberplate hangs a metal st­
rap used 8S a safety connection to the train should the car bet
Comox Logging & Railway Compeny Limited 2-6-2 no. 2,on display at Cour­
tenay,B.C.s tourist centre. The little 1910 Baldwin served most of her
51-year career on the Courtenay operation. On her liast trip before being
set up for display,she ran over the Esquimault & Nanaimo from Ladysmith
to Courtenay under her own steam. Photo by John Hoffmeister.
CANADIAN
15
R A I L
THE SAD SEQUEL ••••••
Early on the foggy morning of December 1,1969, engineer Peter
McGovern and fireman Fred Lawes nudged their faithful 2-8-2 saddle­
tanl< steamer No. 1055 up to the first coupler of the final train of
32 loads. The event ,Ias more than the end of another logging rail­
road. It was also the very end of the daily revenue service of the
steam locomotive in western North America. Since the beginning of
the age of steam in Vancouver Island railroad logging, ~ith the old
British Columbia Mills Timber & Trading at Rock Bay in 1899,now for
the first time the woods are silent and the sound of the steam pot
is no more.
In 1970,Crown Zellerbachs tIo-truck Shay no. 1 is infre-
quently used at the Elk Falls pulp mill,Campbell River,B.C. and of
course there is the annual pilgrimage of Canadian Forest Products
2-8-2 no. 113 over part of their line at foss Camp in the Nimpkish
Valley,the first weekend in June.
lHth the departure of no. 1055 from the Nanaimo River Camp,
the long history of steam railroad logging draws to a close. The 17-
mile run to the Ladysmith diamond only took about 40 minutes. On
arrival at the interchange with the Esquimault & Nanaimo (Ladysmith
diamond ),engine no. 1055 Ias retired in a brief cerelocmy and the
loads were turned over to the E&N for transportat ion to the Che-
ma.1nus mill. At Chemalnus,another 2-8-2T,no. 1066,with engineer Ed
Marty,took the final train down the long switchback to the log dump.
The decision to convert completely to truck haulage was not
made by MacMillan Bloedel until late in 1969. The main reason for
the decision laS the high rate for trans-shipment over the E&N, in
addition to the fact that the capacity of the aging skeleton flats,
compared to that of modern logging trucks, was quite limited. Iron­
ically,No. 1055 had undergone extensive rebuilding just the ~inter
before. By the spring of 1970,no logs had been brought out over the
new truck road into Copper Canyon, which leads to the Chemainus Mill.
At the time the raihlay line was closed,two steam locomotives
Iere l and the other as standby, in each operation.
The future of the Comox Logging & Railway Companys line, a
subsidiary of Crown Zellerbach Building Materials Limited, is also
in doubt, since MacMillan Bloedel shared both operation and upkeep
of the line from Ladysmith to Nanaimo Lakes on that part of it which
was jointly-operated.
Comox Logging have used an eight-cylinder BaldHin VO diesel
engine for the 23.5-mile log haul, since 1960. During November 19G9,
the mechanical marvel hlluled an average of four round trips Iith 30
cars eaCh.
Thus, the most likely solution to log transport Iould ·oe the
retention by Comox of one of the former NacNillan Bloedel steam en­
gines,on a standby basis, since Comoxs tUllber is in much shorter
supply than ItJacHillans and a total conversion to trucks for a
period of perhaps only five years ,/Quld not be very logical.
CANADIAN
16
R A I L
In the final analys is, it appears probable that 14acMillan Bloe­
del will need the services of a locomotive around the barge slip, dry­
ing yard and interchange at the Chemainus 14111. If this is the case,
two of the four steam loconotives might still be used occasionally.
LOCOll!OTIVE ROSTER.
CHENAINUS HILL OPERATION:
No. 10l11~ 2-6-2T Porte r 1924 bin 6817
ex Timberland Development Company no. 4 Youbou,B.C.
ex Victoria Lumber & lYlanufacturing no. l~ Chemainus,B.C.
As of November, 1969, no, 1044 was inoperable at Chemainus.
She will probably be placed on d i.splay at the mill.
No. 1066 2-8-2T Baldlin 1925 bin 58687
ex Bloedel Stewart & Helch no, 4 Menzies Bay,B.C.
As of Novembe r, 1969, no. 1066 is used in limited se rJ ice
at the Chemainus mill.
NANADI0 RIVER OPERATION:
No.
1055 2-8-2T Baldwin 1929 bin 60942
ex Campbell River Timber no. 2
ex iYlacMillan Bloede 1 no, 1007
ex Comox Logging & Railway Company Limited no, 18
No, 1055 will likely be retained by HacMillan Bloedel.
No, 1077 2-6-2 Montreal 1923 bin 65337
ex Cathel & Sorenson no, 1 Port Renfrew,B.C.
ex Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing 2nd. no. 7,Chemainus.
No. 1077 eventually went to Nanaimo River Camp as
standby for no, 1055.
She
will be preserved.
WELCOME
A HEA:({TY WELCOME TO THE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH
IT IS WITH CONSIDERABLE PLEASURE
AND NO LITTLE PRIDE
THAT WE WELCOME TO THE ASSOCIATION
THE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH
MOST RECENTLY ORGANIZED
OF THE ASSOCIATIONS THREE BRANCHES.
,

The result of many months of careful planning was approved
by the Associations Board of Directors on August 31,1970,when the
certificate ratifying the formation of the PACIFIC COAST BRANCH of
the-Canadian Railroad Historical Association was granted.
The following members of the Association made application
for this certificate:
D.L.Davies
D.E .Cummings
R.W.Lockie
E.Il.Johnson
T. Fergusson
A .Lill
R.Meyer
H .Joyner
J. Lambert
D.McGougan
The
first official meeting of the new Branch las held on Oc­
tober 27,1970. Enthusiasm for projects such as field trips, railway
research, a museum and a model layout is running high.
It is expected that officers and committee chairmen will be
elected at a meeting to be held in December. Meanwhile,interested
persons in the Vancouver area have been asked to complete question­
naires relating to their special interests in railways.
The off ic ial address of the PACIFIC COAST BRANCH is P.O .Box
1006,station A,Vancouver 1,B.C. Information may be obtained by com­
municating with this post office box.
A HEARTY WELCOME TO THE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH
EXPLORATIONS
lith
David L. Davies
The south-central portion of British Columbia­
canadas most westerly Province,Hhich in 1971
Iill celebrate its Centennial -is still a
focal point for the Canadian railway histor­
ian. For many years the locale of a complex
and unique rail-Hater transportation system,
today this region contains many interesting
raihTaY relics.
The accompanying photographs taken by Mr. David L. Davies in this
section in the summer of 1970 portray some of the more interesting
of these relics.
Just beyond the IIstation
ll
at Nakusp,B.C .,on the shores of Upper Ar­
row Lake,the rails of CP RATI,s IIMain Line
ll
,as lell as those in a
pile of IIdiscards
ll
beyond the shack on the right-hand side of the
track are dated 1884,1885 and 1886 and are identified as being roll­
ed variously by Barrow (England ),Borchum (Krupp-Germany), Blaenavon
and DOI-,lais (Hales).
At the north end of Kootenay Lake,CP RAIL today maintains about a
quarter-of-a-mile car-barge sHit ching layout. This was formerly the
ship-to-shore portion of the line from Lardeau to Gerrard -33 miles
built in the period 1900-1908. The rails lead ing to the Hharf are
mainly canunell-Sheffield (England) 1885,but there are some Barrow
(England) 1880 at odd places. There is also a stub-switch (Rocky
Mountain Branch please note).
The sy,itch-stand shown is not that belonging to the aforementioned
stub-switch, but is not more than 50 yards from it. The. car-barge lo-
ading slip at Lardeau can be seen in the upper right-hand portion
of the photograph.
Mr. Davies took these photographs in September,1970.
Cartoon courtesy MODEL RAILROADER
SIIADY ~leJ
HO
Mooa R.R,
CLue
I vole we lake up the question of coupler~ ronighl.

TDill-TABLE TUMULT and BUDD-CAR BOW-OUT = = = = =
Canadian National made most of its schedule changes on Sep­
tember 14th., this year (1970), but has not yet issued a nev, public
system time-table, apparently preferring to wait until the end of
1970. Meanwhile, to fill the interval, two condensed poclcet folders
have been re-issued,designated CEl and CIH. In addition to the
usual adjustments to the Montreal-Gaspe and Montreal-Toronto-Van­
couver services which are made each September, the Montreal -Toronto
morning TURBO Trains 62 and 63 were rescheduled to leave at 0910
instead of 0745. To accommodate this change,RAPIDO Trains 60 and 61
and LAKESHORE Trains 50 & 51 were each set back 10 minutes, leaving
at 0920 and 0930,respectively.
The afternoon TURBO Trains 68 & 69 were retimed from 1610
to 1630. All TURBOs stops at Guildwod were eliminated, but Trains
63 and 68 stop at Hontreal
l s
Dorval suburb. Ottavla-Montreal Train
36,~hose earlier departure time lVas often a source of complaint nolV
leaves tt 1730. Ottawa-Brockville Trains ~·O & 41, which connect with
Trains 50 & 51 at Brockville had the same 10-minute adjustment made
in their schedules.
One change was made on November 8th.,when Ottawa-Toronto
overnight .Drains 48 & 49 were combined !/ith Montreal-Toronto Trains
58 & 59 at Belleville. The Montreal-Port Huron Sleeping Car Service
was also discontinued, ending the last sleeping car service into
southwestern Ontario.
CP RAIL IS new timetable reflects the drastic cuts made in
Montreal-Ottawa and Montreal-Sherbrooke services on August lst.1970,
but the arrangements for the end of the Toronto-Owen Sound service
were made just a little too late. The last run was to.be made by
Train 305 on Friday,October 30th.,five days after the change of
timel The Toronto-Buffalo-New York service, formerly an overnight
coach and sleeper with a two-hour lay-over in Buffalo,was changed
to a Toronto-Buffalo Dayliner ,operating as Trains 321-376 and 371-
322, connecting with Penn Centralls Empire Service Trains 74 & 71,
to and from New York City.
Montreal-Quebec (City) Trains 151 & 152 were reduced to ex­
cept Sunday operation from daily,while afternoon Trains 153 & 154
were named MAISONNEUVE,after Paul Chomedy,Sieur de •• ,founder of Mon­
treal. All trains were sli~1tly rescheduled and the local stops are
made by Trains 151 (153 on Sunday) & 156. It is noteworthy (but pro­
bably unimportant) that Train 155 has a 3-minute connection at Mon­
treal ~ith Delaware & Hudson Train 10.
On the Montreal-Vaudreuil-Rigaud suburban line, there ,as
considerable rescheduling and renumbering of trains, resulting in
the elimination of one trip each ~ay between Montreal and Hudson ,
(Trains 261 & 264),but restoring the number of train-sets used from
six to seven. Trains eliminated were return trips which carried
CANADIAN
21
R A I L
few passengers,but allowed one train-set to make two runs.The two
late runs were made half-an-hour later, leaving Montreal at 2130
and 2330,while two rush-hour trains reverted to their former depar­
ture times of 1640 and 1750. The gallery cars now go to Vaudreuil
on Train 243 at 16L~0, return on Train 248 arriving at 1830 and leave
again at 1845 as Train 275 for Rigaud, returning the following morn­
ing.
Halloween 1970 may be remembered by residents of the area
of southwestern Ontario bordering on Lake Huron as the time when
they had their last passenger train ride. Passenger service ended
October 30& 31 and November 1 on five regional branch lines ( four
CN,one CP RAIL),all of which were served by the fast, versatile, self­
propelled rail-diesel car. Most of the trains carried over-capa­
city loads of children and others, riding for short distances during
the last few days of operation, including a party of 50 costumed
Halloweeners,who probably failed to realize that it was CN who was
playing the trick or that riding buses from Kincardine to Toronto
would be no treat!
Trains affected 1ere 670-671-672,Toronto-Owen Sound ;656-668-
669,palmerston-Southampton; 662 to 667 inclusive,Stratford-Listowel­
Palmerston-Kincardine; 660-661,Stratford-Goderich and CP RAIL Trains
304-305-306,Toronto-Orangeville-Owen Sound.
All trains ran passenger extra after October 25th. cars
used in the last days of operation were CP RAIL 9103 and CN 6101,
6110,6118 and 6354. Car 6110 is the original Budd Company RDC-l de­
monstrator no. 2960 hich first appeared on CN s rails in 1950. Its
unusual Pioneer III trucks were of interest to last-day-of-operation
photographers.
The fusilade of exploding torpedoes,as the last trains pas­
sed through Palmerston marked not only the end of passenger service
but the eclipse of this once-busy railway centres importance. Ser­
vice on most of these lines dates back to the 1870s when the Grand
Trunk and the Great western Raih,ay interests built branch lines in­
to the area during the competitive period which terminated in the
GTR-GHR merger in 1882. The Stratford-Goderich line was part of the
Buffalo & Lake Huron Railway,opened in 1856 and later acquired by
the Grand Trunk. It has enjoyed passenger service for most of the
ensuing 114-year period, but was apparently closed for a month after
the change of gauge in 1873 and used for storage of broad-gauge rol­
ling stock while the Stratford Shops caught up with the back-log of
conversion ~/Ork.
The CP RAIL Toronto-Owen Sound line waS the result of the
efforts of two predecessor companies, the Credit Valley Railway and
the Toronto,Grey & Bruce Railway,both of which built lines from
Toronto to Orangeville in the early 1870s via different routes.The
T.G.& B. built westward to Teeswater (with Grand Trunk support),but
was bought out by the Canadian Pacific in 1884,one year after it
had acquired the Credit Valley. Canadian Pacific then built north­
ward to Owen Sound, thus securing a base for steamship operation on
the Great Lakes,which continued until after ~vorld War II. The pre­
sent line uses the Credit Valley from Toronto to Melville and the
T.G. & B. from Melville to Fraxa (delightful namel). The pine -clad
CA NAD IAN
22
R A I L
slopes of the Credit River valley,with the high bridge at Forks of
Credit, is the principal scenic attraction and well-rememberd by
railway enthusiasts.
CORmlALL STREET RAILVJAY -OVER AND OUT? = = = = =
The City of Cornwall in eastern Ontario has been served for
101 these many years by a company VThich >./as typical of many such
enterprises vlhich formerly operated in small cities and towns every­
where in North America. The Cormlall Street Railway,Light and Power
Company –
to give it its full title -provided public transportation
in and around Cornwall ,lith electric streetcars unt il 19L~8 and the­
reafter Ilith trolley coaches and motor buses. It also switched an
ever-increasing number of freight cars between the Canadian National
and CP RAIL and most of the local industries. It sold and distribut­
ed electric power through its own system in the area. It operated
school buses under contract VTith the local school boards.
Following the replacement of the streetcars by trolley coa­
cnes and buses, a belt-line was built to eliminate most of the mid­
dle-of-the-street trackage. Spur lines were extended to neVI indus­
tries. Replacement electric locomot i ves, sweepers, a plovl and spare
parts were acquired from other electric lines as the latter were
abandoned or converted to diesel unit operation.
Recently however, the Company has been feeling the financial
squeeze. To reduce expenses, rail switching services were cut back,
resulting in complaints from the industries and the connecting tail­
vFays, which were themselves hard-pressed to retain the high-rated
Cornwall freight traffic against aggressive highway competition.This
led to an option being taken by CP RAIL to purchase the CSRg rail
facilities. The option vTaS later retailed to Canadian National,this
company to purchase the property on or before December 31,1970. The
purchase Vlould include existing trackage, ten electric locomotives,
service units and one building. Measures to protect the interests af
CSR employees were to be included in the agreement.
CN proposes to abandon existing trackage of the Old r Line between York and McConnell streets,over vlhich the CSR has
been operating; re-lay track on the former Ne>l York Central roadbed
to a connection >lith the Kingston Subdivision (CNS present main
line) and use this route instead of the old one between the east
and west sections of Cornwall. presumably the electric operation
would be phased out as soon as possible after the purchase, as was
the procedure several years ago at Oshawa and st. catherines,Ont.
The transit operation has contributed greatly to the CSRs
financial problems,as it has been run at a loss for several years.
The trolley coaches ended their service May 31,1970 and were sold
to the Toronto Transit Commission to provide spare parts for the
electrical components of the TTCs rebuilt vehicles. December 31
VIas the terminal date for the CSRs transit operation and at the
time of writing, City Council is considering a number of proposals
for continuing transit service. Some form of stop-gap service will
have to be arranged after the end of the year until another operator
can resume the service.
CANADIAN 2) R A I L
Most of the proposals made to date anticipate a deficit op­
eration,the deficit being paid by the City. This requires referen­
dum approval,hich would not be possible to obtain until the end of
the year,at the earliest.
FLYnfG SCOTSMAN MID FLYmG SNOWFLAKES = = = = =
The eight-car exhibition train hauled by Alan Peglers pa­
cific-type locomotive ex-LNER no. 4472 Flying Scotsman completed
its tour of the central United States and Ontario and Quebec early
in October,1970 at Niagara Falls,Ont. After spending some time in
Canadian Nationals yard at the border city, the train was brought
back to Toronto October 31 for storage. The locomotive will be kept
at CNs Spadina Roundhouse and indoor storage will be provided for
the pullman parlor car Lydia and the observation-lounge car. Mr.
Pegler is attempting to organize a tour to Canadas west coast in
1971,with a possible side-trip to westcoast United States cities.If
he is successful in this endeavour, the exhibition train may make the
trip over Canadian National rails. The possibility that the exhibi­
tion train will return to the United Kingdom is quite remote and in
some quarters it is rumored that the Flying Scotsman will be sold
in North America if a purchaser can be found.
RIDDLE: WHEN IS A PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE? = = = = =
The Canadian Transport Commission recently answered this
enigmatic question when Penn Central applied for a subsidy for its
two passenger trains which operate through Canada between Fort Erie,
Onto and Windsor,Ont.,in each direction,on their Buffalo-Detroit-Ch­
icago journeys. This application was promptly refused by the Com­
mission on the ground that the service 1I1as not a passenger train
service within the meaning of the Canadian Transport Act.
Penn Central thereupon retaliated by discontinuing all stops
in Canada except for Canadian Customs inspection and crew changes.
stops are normally made at Fort Erie,St. Thomas and Windsor,Ont. The
trains,numbers 14,17,52 and 351 formerly served Welland,Waterford,
Tillsonburg and Ridgetown,Ont. They form part of the Penn Centrals
blanket application to discontinue all passenger train service west
of Buffalo and Harrisburgh, which is still pend ing before the Unites
States Interstate Conunerce Commiss ion.
URBAN REDEVELOPMENT:KEEP YOUR CITY BEAUTIFUL = = =
Canadian National opened its Saskatoon,Sask. civic centre
project on the site of the former conveniently-located passenger
station and coach yard,recently. On November lL~,1970,the Algoma
Central Railway,not to be outdone by the two larger systems,announ­
ced plans for a new civic centre, to be built along the water-front
area of Sault Ste.Marie,Ont. To cost $30 million, it Nould include
a new city hall, shopping plaza,hotel and apartment buildings.Shades
of Clergue 1
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S ARCHIVEE
The AFTERNOON TEA-TRAIN TO WISTERIA HALT ~E1E7
CANADIAN RAIL
published by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORlC1Il ASSOCIATION ~;~,~:,~2Qu:~·n B
Assooiate Membership including 1J. issues of
HCa.nadian Rail 8.00 annually.
EDITOR S. VlTort.hen FRODUCTION F.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A Kemp
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beat.t.y & F.F.Angus
VISIT THE
Canadian Railway Museum
W
VISITEZ LE
Musee Ferroviaire Canadien
OFEN MAY SEFT.
Ll._.
OUVERT MAl· SEFT.
DIRECTOR OF BRANCHES
C.W.K.Heard, 74 Southern Drive, ottawa 1, Canada
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIF SERVICES
11r~ J.A.Beatty. 4982 Queen ~lary Road, Montreal 248, quebec, Canada.
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA rlr.lo{.Iveson . Secty .• P.O.Box J.52, Terminal HAil Ottawa Onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN Mro Donald W.Scare 12407 Lansdotme Drive, Apt. 101, Edmonton Alta.
ASSOCIATION REPRESENlATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY
SASKATCH EWAN
PACIFIC COAST
PAR EAST
BRITISH ISLES
MANITOBA
ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. 3/67 Somerset St. ~.., ottawa, Ontario.
J .S.Nlcholoson, 2)06 Arnold St .. Saskatoon, Saskatchet~an.
Peter Cox. 609 Cottonwood Ave., Coquitlam, British Columbia.
w.D.McKeo;llll. 6-7. 4-chome. iamate-cho.Suita Ctty, Osaka. Japan.
J .H.Sanders. 67 11,110 Way, Ampthill, Beds., England.
K.G.iounger. 267 Vernon Road, Winnipeg, ~ianitoba.
~Ir. Donald W.Scafe,12407 Lansdowne Drive. Apt. lOl.Edmonton Alta,
Copyright 1970 Printed in canada on Canadian paper,

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