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Canadian Rail 224 1970

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Canadian Rail 224 1970

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IVO.224
:1.970

SERIES
SIX HUNDREDS
M.Peter Murphy.
PRIOR TO THE COlv1PLElION OF THE MONTREAL AND SOU­
thern Counties Rail~ay to Granby,Q,uebec, in
1916, the Company had already rece ived the
first lot of its famous six-hundred series
interurban cars. This is an account of
these famous Canadian trolleys.

By their nature, the operations of the Montreal and Southern
Counties were divided into t10 parts -the suburban and the inter­
urban. The former consisted of the Montreal-Longueuil and the Mon­
treal-I4ackayville runs,while the latter included the Montreal-St­
Angele and Montreal-Granby operations. To handle the traffic on
the interurban division,the M. & S.C. had a fleet of eleven 600-
series passenger cars, matching 200-series trailers and compatable
500-series baggage motor and express cars.
To the serious observer, the visual differences between these
cars were easily detectable. Fortunately,their interesting history
is easily obtained. The first order for the 600-series cars was
awarded
to the National Steel Car Company of Hamilton,Ontario, in
1913. The order included six motor-passenger cars, two trailer-pas­
senger cars and two baggage-express motor cars. Delivery of these
units is reported as complete in the November,19l4 issue of the
CANADIAN RAID1AY AND MARJNE HORLD.
~Traffic was apparently heavier than had been anticipated and
as a consequence, two orders were placed with the Ottawa Car Com­
pany for some five additional units. The first order was completed
in March,1918,voIhen two motor units were delivered and in December,
1922,three motor cars and two trailer cars were delivered, comple-
, ting order number two.
~ ,
Six Hundred Series M. R..S.C.Ry. no. 608 heads a two-car train at Ste­
Angele,Que.,on May 15,1956. Photo courtesy Stephen D. Maguire.
At Granby West CGranby,Que.),the eastern end of the M. & S.C.Ry.,no. 607
stands in the summer sunshine on June 12,1949.Photo courtesy R.F.Corley.
CANADIAN 264 R A I L
IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS
We have the Plant and Organization to Build
STREET RAIL WAY, SUBURBAN AND INTERURBAN CARS,
and Can Make Prompt Deliveries.
Portion of Passenger Car Etecttng Department, Showing Interurban Cars in Course of Construction.
Mr. General Manager:-
When you start to figure on new Rolling Stock there are
three things that present themselves:
1st-The Quality.
2nd-The Deliveries.
3rd-The Price.
The character of
our organization makes the first as safe as a Government Bond.
Our Plant and Equipment insures the second.
The efficiency of
our Equipment and Methods make it possi­ble to make a very
attractive feature of the third.
Finally-An inquiry will place all the proofs in your hands.
National Steel Car Company, Limited
ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO HAMILTON
Montreal Office Welter-a Uaioa Code Worlu and OperaHJl8 Office.
Shaughnessy Building Hamilton, Ontario
CANADIAN 265 R A I L
This proved to be the last major order for nel., equipment made
by the M.& S.C. The only other major addition to its roster were
the cars of the V1indsor,Essex & Lake Shore,which were purchased
second-hand in 1939. (CANADIAN RAIL,No.185,February,1967.)
The 600-series cars were the largest to run on the M.& S.C. ,
and
Tere to spend the next thirty four years or so, shuttling back.
and
forth on the interurban division and, in the latter years on
the suburban division because of service cut-backs. During these
34 years,each car is believed to have run more miles than Appollo
XII on its return trip to the moonl
The
600-series cars had str!=J.ight sides, sheathed vertically lith
poplar sheeting. The roof was of the monitor type, with the deck sash
glazed with opalescent glass,as were the upper side-sash windows.On
the windows that opened,wire screens of 12 ga.wire were provided.
The car underframes were of the lightweight, through-steel type and
sprung anticlimbers at each end took care of minor bumps and col­
lisions. The floors were of Georgia pine, laid in two layers, with
felt insulation between.
The interior of the cars Jere finished in Hexican mahogany, with
Ottawa Carls standard metal fittings (1918 & 1922). Seats were stan­
dard H. & S.C .,finished in PEGAMOID. Sash locks and PANASOTE cur­
tains Tere provided on the windows. The cars ,.,ere heated by a coal-
,fired, forced hot-air system, located in the front of the car. A lav­
atory room with a toilet and a Tater faucet lere also provided. The
interior lights were in six circuits, arranged in clusters along the
upper deck, also along each deck rail. Motors were 50 hp. each, with
VTestinghouse controls and air-brakes. Train-line receptacles were
provided at each end of these cars for train operation. OHIO BRASS
trolley bases and retrievers were fitted. Luminous headlights and
locomotive-type pilots were supplied,along with sno,l-scrapers. TOM­
LINSON couplers and fittings completed the accessories. On delivery
the paint scheme was green with gold lettering.
In the latter years, the cars ,,,ere painted traction orange, no
doubt as an experiment in providing greater visibility,as the auto
car became more popular and level crossing accidents increased. By
1942, however, the cars had been repainted to the M. & S.C. standard
of Canadian National Railways green, with gold lettering.
Despite the fact that two trolley poles had been provided, the
cars were single-end and the second pole was used only for reverse
movements with single units and reverse running in train operation.
As a rule, the cars ,,,ere operated back-to-back,providing control
facilities at both ends of the train for stub-line ope~ation.
All of these cars lasted unt il the end of the M. <:l; S.C. in
1956,when,like the rest of the equipment,exhausted and run-down,they
were disposed of. Only two ex&aples of these classic cars remain.
No. 611 (ex-no.606) is presently preserved at the Canadian Railway
Museum at Delson/St-Constant,Que.,and No. 610 at the Seashore Trol­
ley Museum, Kennebunkport,Maine.
.,


t
CANADIAN 269 R A I L
Waiting in a winter wonderland,no. 610 (double windows and all) and snow­
plow stand in the station at Marieville,que.,waitlng For orders to start
the westbound trip back to McGill Street,Montr~al. The date is January 15
1949
and the weather is Fine. Photo courtesy R.F.Corley.

Cover complement I The same M. & S.C. train that appears on the cover,on
its way to Ste-Angele,Qu8. No. 608 is on the rear end going east.
Photo courtesy Stephen D. Maguire.
In the old paint scheme of traction orange, M. &.S.C. no. 603 makes up
a
train with no. 504 at Montreal,on May 30,1941.Photo courtesy S.D.Maguire.
It is curious that present-day rad io traffic reports often ex­
press the opinion that 1e vTould be better off if these cars were
still operating over Victoria Bridge, -and this some Ilj· years
,after the last 600-series clattered across that noble spanl llaybe
··they werent the fastest mode of transportation but t:1ey did move
slow and steadyll,1hich is more than can be said for the vehicles
with the belching exhaust pipes on the same structure todayl
Ah,progress •••• 1
t
Marieville,Qu8.,was a favourite place to photograph the 600 Series. Here.
M. & S.C. no. 602 stands on the siding while Canadian Nationals diesel­
powered Montreal-Granby passenger train holds the main line. This great
event took place on May 15,1956. Photo courtesy S.D.Maguire.
Home base for M. & S.C. no. 609. Here,it is pictured in front of the Car
Barns at St. Lambert,Qu8., on June 9,1949.Photo courtesy of R.F.Corley.
CANADIAN 271 R A I L
AN INTERURBAN CAR OF
DEPENDABLE CONSTRUCTION
IS WHAT YOU WANT ON YOUR ROAD
Side and End Visw of High Speed Interurban Cars built fCJr the Montreal and Southern Countiea Railwltoy Company.
WE BUILD THEM
There are features in the construction of these cars which
will commend themselves
to your operating executives.
We have solved the problem of
Maximum Strength with Minimum Weight
Just give us an idea that you would like to be shown. Our
experts will be pleased to prove our contentions to your
satisfaction.
The Summer rush of traffic will soon be here.
Deliveries can
be made attractive NOW.
National Steel Car Company, Limited
ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO HAMILTON
Montreal QHico WellerD Union Coda Work. and Operating Offlco.
Shaughnessy Building Hamilton, Ontario

GOO-SERIES TECHNICAL SPECTIICATIONS.
year built 1914 1918 1922
Length overall 541
211
56
1 561
Length over Vestibule 531
2
531 8
11
531 8
11
Body bolster-centres 291
211
30
1
8 30
1
8
Hidth overall 31
61.
4
81 6
11
81 6
Height: rail to roof 121
8~ 12 8~n 121
S~
Total …. le ight 56,250 lb.6l,000 lb.6l,000 lb.
Seating capacity 60 60 60
VI-306cv+ tl:otors 1,1-306cV 1f-306cV +
Brakes Control ~-H .L. H-H .L. H-H .L.
+ vlestinghouse Manufacturing Company.
1914
group 6 units Road nos. 600,601,602,603,604,605.
Built by National steel Car Company,Hamilton,Ont.
1915 group 2 units Road nos. 606,607.
Built by Ottawa Car Company,ottawa,Ont.
1922 group 3 units Road nos. 608,609,610.
~:
No. 9
104
107
504 610
611
621
Built by Ottawa Car Company,Otta …. ra,Ont.
No. 606 was renumbered to no. 611 in 1927.
No. 602 was burned in 1928 and replaced by second 602,
formerly no. 203,with motors and control equipment
added.
Preserved Cars of the 1-1ontreal & Southern Counties Ry.
built 1911
II 1912
(combine)
(express)
built 1922
II 1918
II 1930
Branford Museum,East Haven,Conn.,USA.
Canadian Railway Museum,Delson,Que.,Canada.
o .E.R.H.A., Rockl~ood,Ont. ,Canada.
Seashore Trolley Museum,Kennebunkport,Me.USA.
Seashore Trolley I,1usewn, Kennebunkport, Me. USA.
Canadian Raihray Museum,Delson,Que.,Canada.
Seashore Trolley Museum,Kennebunkport,Me.USA.
..
. , ……. i.l. t.
11 L ~
~. Dl}, £NIi N
: : •..• i: J:C.. :: : .:: : .:
R.F • LEGGEI
~ IKE MANY ANOTHER SCANDANAVIAN
city, the thousand-year old
city of Bergen,on the ,est
coast of Norway, is built
on a narrow land-shelf at
the waters edge of a beau­
t iful fjord.
Unlike other Norwegian cities, it is surrounded by seven hills,which
provide an incomparably scenic setting, even by the most exacting
Norwegian standards! Over the years, the confines of Bergenfjord
have been unable to restrain the outward -and hence the upward
growth -of the city and a part of it has grown up on the slope of
one of the hills -or mountains,as they should more properly be cal­
led. The hill is Mount F18ien.
As a means of communication and as a diversion for the citi-
zens and visitors of Bergen,a funicular ra~way has been built up
Mount
F18iens side,for a distance of 84lf meters and it is called,
as it quite properly should be, the F18ibanen. Nhen the line was
chartered on February 20,1914, it was named the F18ybanen, but the
Company persists in calling itself the F18ibanen for reasons best
known to itself I
The F18ibanen, then, is a s ingle-track funicular, but it shares
with some other funiculars the peculiarity of having a tlO-tracked
passing sect ion, exactly mid-lay on the line. There are only two
cars on the line and, as one might expect, they are at oppos ite ends
of it when they reach the termini. Opened for traffic on January
15,1918,the funicular was reconstructed and modernized in 1991, be­
ing re-opened for business on April 13th. of that year.
Starting from the lower station, carved out of the solid rock,
some 10 meters above the fjord, the line rises on a 4990 gradient,
the 80-seat cars being assisted by means of a long steel cable that
passes over a lind ing drum in the linch-house, although when the
we ight of the descend ing car and passengers approximates that of
the ascending loaded car, very litt.le power is necessary to move the
two vehicles. The operation, in the best tradition of Noftlegian rail­
way practice, is electrical.
~
Rumbling down the hill,the down-bound car approaches the lOIJer terminus
of the FL~IBANEN,which is located in the rock and reached via a tunnel.
On the left,beneath the bridge, one of the suburban stations can be seen.
Photograph courtesy of the Author.

.,
CANADIAN
277
R A I L
Not only does the F18ibanen carry citizens and visitors up the
precipitous side of Mount F18ien to enjoy the magnificent viell from
the top, but it also serves as a sort of commuter line for those
residents of Bergen who have built houses on the steep mountain
slope. The funicular has three suburban stations: Pranisgt Street,
… rhere the gradient is 26%, Fjellveien street and, just on the upper
side of a short tunnel, Skansenyren Street, both stations being on
the 49% grade. The platforms of t~10 of these stations can be seen
in the accompanying photographs. The meter-gauge line is ~on private
right-of-way throughout its 84!I· meters, … rhich,for the most part, is
a narrow ledge carved through or along the rocl two
3.3
If.5
To reach the upper terminal, the funicular passes through
tunnels and rises 302 meters. The normal speed of the cars is
meter.s per second and the time for the trip is usually about
minutes, depending on the length of the stops at intermediate
tions.
sta-
For the raihray modeler, the high point of interest on the F18i­
banen can be found on the roof of the upper station,-F18ien. Here
is located a remarkable model railway. The model may be said to be
conventional in an unconventional n~nner. It is an exact scale re­
presentation of the F18ibanen Funicular, complete 1ith single-track,
the passing loop midway and two small passenger cars, mirroring the
larger operation.
What is unconvent ional and unique about the model is that it
iS,operated electrically and so controlled that the actual location
of the cars on the F18ibanen Funicular is shown at all times by the
position of the little cars on the model,so that the observer can
tell just where the real cars are,on their journies up or down the
steep incline,
The photographs illustrating this article 1ere taken by the
writer during a visit to Bergen a few years ago and show the real
F18ibanen and the upper stations model of the larger operation.
Curiously enough, the management of this funicular has apparently de­
cided that it is more important for the passengers at the upper
station to mo … r, by means of the model, where the cars are. The in­
tending passengers at the Town Station either do r.ot need to know
or are informed by other and less ingenious meansl

The station at the top of the FL~IBANEN (at the top of the page,natch)
sports the model of the funicular railway with its model of one of the
cars at the upper (model) terminus. A closer look at the model,a few
minutes later shows the two mineature cars at the passing loop midway
along the line,shown for real on page 275. The lower or main terminal
of the incline railway is located in a tunnel,carved out of the solid
rock of the cliff face, All photographs courtesy of the Author.
One of the cars of the FL0IBANEN approaching the upper station through a
heavy rock cut necessary on this part of the line. The old harbour of
Bergen is in the background. Photograph courtesy of Author.
The upbound car is slowing to enter the upper terminus. Passengers in the
rear get a spectacular view of the old harbour of Bergen. Photo by Author.

EY F.A.KEMP
THE PASSENGER PICTURE
DEBITS -August
1,1970 was the cut-off date for l~ daily and 1 Satur­
day-only passenger train services of CP RAIL. Affected were Trains
131-134 (daily) and 137-138 (Saturday),Montreal-Ottawa,via Monte­
bello (North Shore line); 233-234 (the Rideau), 232-235 (the Al­
ouette), Montreal-Ottawa, via Vankleek Hill; 201-206,Mont real-Megan­
tic (on the Short Line).
These trains made their last runs on July 31. One daily ser­
vice will remain to cover each of these routes. Trains 41 & 42 (the
Atlantic Limited) now make several stops at some of the stations
formerly served by 201-206.
CP RAIL has thus taken advantage of the provisions of Cana­
das Transportation Act,which permits discontinuance of passenger
trains on lines where more than one daily service exists, by giving
notice to the public of the discontinuance. This has already been
done on the Toronto-Hndsor,Toronto-Peterborough and Calgary-Edmon­
ton lines. Only the Montreal-Quebec City line now has more than one
daily service,with the exception of CP RAIL lines in the Montreal
suburban area.
CREDITS +
News on the passenger train front! TURBO has returned IOn May
25,1970,Canadian National Trains 62 & 63 left Montreal and Toronto
at 0745 hrs.,marking the re-introduction of a single service of the
trouble-plagued TURBO. The 4-hour 5-minute schedule provided a be­
fore-noon arrival in both cities,with a stop at Montreals suburban
Dorval westbound and Torontos Guildwood eastbound.
On June 22,with scarcely a murmur,an afternoon TURBO service
was added, with Trains 68 & 69 leaving Montreal and Toronto at 1610
hrs.,with arrival at 2015 hrs.,stopping at Dorval eastbound and at
Guildwood westbound.
Once again there are seven (7) daily round-trip passenger
services between Montreal and Toronto: 2 TURBOs, 2 RAp:mos,the Lake­
shore,the Bonaventure and the Cavalier. The day trains are bun­
ched together in the morning and afternoon, while the overnight Ca­
valier leaves at 2355 hrs.,when things are relatively qUiet!
TURBOs fares are now slightly higher than previously,as the
surcharge has been boosted by $ 1, while RED and vlHITE day fares in­
creased during the year. TURBOLUX (coaCh) fares are RED,$ 12.90
CANADIAN
2!:l1
R A I L
WHITE $ 14.40 and BLUE $ 15.90, while TURBOCLUB (parlour car) fare
is $ 22.90 every day,but includes a complimentary meal.
While loading was light when the service was re-introduced,
it has increased steadily. However,there have been delays and late
arrivals and the sides of some of the power cars are streaked with
black,as though oil were leaking from the gear-boxes. There are
also muffled rumblings from CNls Motive Power Department and appar­
ently not without reason, for on Sunday, August 16, westbound after­
noon TURBO konked out at the bottom of the hill west of Guildwood,
when two of the four power turbines quit. Some pundits are trying
to make something out of the fact that they were in the end pointed
at Toronto.
ill ANOOFF S + –
The Canadian Transport Commission,on June lB,ground out its
decision on CP RAlLIs application to terminate operation of THE CAN­
ADIAN -Trains 1 & 2,Montreal-Vancouver and Trains 11 & 12,Toronto­
Sudbury,Ont.
The Commission agreed .. ,ith CP RAlLIs contention that the seL­
vice as presently operated is uneconomic and would remain so,but in
view of the fact that significantly large humbers of people use
these passenger train services, they should be continued in oper­
ation,glving the Company until July 20 to detennine lays of oper­
ating sleeping car and meal services at break-even levels and to
assess all possible economies in the operation of the service. CP
RAIL set to Iork at once to meet this deadline. (See below.)
The Commission estimated the 1968 loss as $ 15,171,024 of
which $ 7,800,000 resulted from Sleeping car and $ 1,700,000 from
meal car operation. The total is about $ 4 million less than the
figure submitted by CP RAIL,but this difference results from the
manner of detennining operating revenues and losses, – a matter hot­
ly disputed between the Commission and the Company. The validity of
the method has now been referred to the Supreme Court of Canada for
ratification.
Passenger loads on THE CANADIAN during 1968 varied from 40
to Lj·OO or from 29 to 89 percent capacity,the average being 61 percent.
Under the Railway Act,a company which has applied to abandon a ser­
vice and is ordered by the Commission to continue it, is entitled to
a federal government subsidy to make up the loss. The subsidy to be
paid in 1971 if the train Iere ordered to run, would be based on los­
s~s incurred during 1970. Presumably by the time the Supreme Court
has decided the disagreement regarding the costing fonnula,1971 will
be well under way!
Almost
simultaneously CP RAIL gave notice (early August) to
the Commission of its intention to reduce Montreal-Quebec City ser­
vice· from three trains daily to one,effective September 8. But the
Commission denied its approval and, in a rare move,ordered CP RAIL
to keep the three trains running.
Nothing daunted,CP RAIL announced increases in one-way pas­
senger fares between Montreal and points along the Lakeshore sub­
urban district line,effective August 10. An application was also
made for a hike in fares for multiple-ride tickets. The Canadian
Transport Commission said it would rule on the applicability of
CANADIAN
2tj2
R A I L
these increases in the fall.
In the matter of THE CANADIAN, CP RAIL beat the July 20th.
deadline by three days and produced the required assessment on
July 17. The proposal apparently provides for a try-weaklyopera­
tion of the train between mid-October and mid–May,perhaps to coin-­
cide with the change of time and timetables.
Meanwhile, the Commiss ion is to hold public hearings in Win-
nipeg,Calgary, Regina and Vancouver, during the last two weeks of
August.
THE LAm RUN OF THE INTERNATIONAL –
The passenger train that emerged from the grimy trainshed of
Chicago r s Dearborn Station at 2100 hrs. on June 11,1970, was the
remnant of Grand Trunk Ra-ilroad r sTrain 156, known to the public as
the International. Once the premier train of the Grand Trunk Rail­
way System, the International had a long history of successful op­
eration spanning 70 years.
Originally a Montreal-Chicago name train, it carried a thr­
ough sleeper until 1939,,~hen impending wartime exigencies required
separat ion of the Montreal-Toronto and Toronto -Chicago po rt ions,
although both parts carried the same numbers, -lLf & 15. From 1933
to 1965,the Montreal __ Toronto train ~TaS pooled and jointly oper­
ated with Canad ian Pacific and included in the consist a CP sleep­
er until 1939 and a CP parlour car thereafter.
Train 15 departed from CP r s indsor Station in Montreal dur­
ing this period and also carried CPR Ottawa-Toronto through cars be­
tv,een Brockville and Toronto.
In 1965, the pooling arrangement .. TaS terminated and CN I s
RAPIDO began Montreal-Toronto service and shortly after, all CN
trains ,,(ere renumbered and renamed,only the Toronto-Chicago over­
night trains retaining the name International and taking the num­
bers 155 & 156.
This was only the second change in number for this famous
train. It was assigned numbers 1 & 2 from its introduction until
1912,when the Continental Limited began operation on the Grand
Trunk and Grand Trunk Pacific between Montreal and Prince Rupert,
B.C. as 1 & 2 and the International was given the numbers 14 &
15.
The IIInternational has always provided the fastest service
between Montreal and Chicago but following the Montreal -Toronto
accelerations of 1931,the westbound service was as much as 4t hours
faster than the eastbound. This_ ,TaS the result of local service
requirements between Toronto and Montreal for 14,lhile 15 westbound
was an express. The layover time in Toronto westbound was also much
less. This anomaly .. las only resolved by the introduction of the
morning RAPIDO,Train 60,but Chicago-Montreal service has never been
as convenient as that in the lestern direct ion.
Hestbound,the International
ll
had the advantage of conven-
ient connections ,~ith U.S.trains for the south, southwest and west
coast cities,most of which left and arrived in the afternoon. Now­
adays,travellers using the one remaining service from Toronto to
CANADIAN 283 R A I L
… The International Limited,CN Train 15,at Sortin,just west of Montreal
1Ir West,Que.,headed by engine 6241 class U-2-h,on October 16,1949.
Photo from E.A.Toohey Collection,C.R.H.A.
Chicago will have to stay overnight in the l,Vindy City to make
most of these connections.
Perhaps the extreme case of this connection dilemma is that
of the A.T.& S.F.Ry. (Santa Fe) Train 17 Super Chief and El Cap­
itan,which leaves Dearborn Station at the same time (6.30 p.m. )
that GTW Train 158 ~ltaple Leaf is arriving from Toronto, with a
connection from Montreal. The C.M.st.P.& P.R.R.(Milwaul,ee Road)Tr­
ain 103,which combines the Cities of Denver,Portland,San Francisco
and Los Angeles with the Challanger and is thus facetiously known
as the City of Everywhere,leaves only half an hour earlier at
6.00 p.m. Passengers intending to connect with these tllO principal
trains to the west coast must therefore wait 23t or 24 hours.
Canadian National replaced Trains 155 & 156 by Railiners
between Toronto and London,Ont.,nurnbered 653 & 654,running at ap­
proximately the same times. Grand Trunk Western is obliged to main­
tain its Chicago-Port Huron,Mich. services,pending an examination by
the Interstate Commerce Commission. As GTI~ Train 155 presently lea­
ves Port Huron before Train 156 arrives,three sets of equipment are
needed to operate the jJwo disconnected services,whereas only t10
trainsets could operate the through service. The Mayor of Sarnia,Ont.
has already complained to the government that his city has been de­
prived of an essential train service.
SIMPLEX one-way dump car,built for the British Columbia Electric
Railway at the Dominion Plant of Canadian Car & Foundry Company,
Montreal in December,1911. The trucks of the car in the photograph
are not quit~ complete,as they do not show the door buffers,which
were applied after the car had been loaded for shipment.
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S ARCHIVES
CANADIAN RAIL
published by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HIS10RlCAl ASSOCI1I.TION ~~,~,~24u:~·on ·s·
ASBooiat.e Meznbership inoluding 11 issues of
Canadian Rail e.oo annually.
EDITOR S.VVort.hen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A.Keznp
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beat.t.y & F.F.Angus
VISIT THE
Canadian Railway l:Inseum
VISITEZ L E
Musee Ferroviaire Canadien
OPEN MAY SEPT, OUVERT MAl· SEPT.
DIRECTOR OF BRANCHES
C.W.K.!ieeld, 74 Southern Dr1ve, Ottl1 …. B 1, C9.huda
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP SERVICES
Mr. J .A.Beatty, 4982 Queen Mary Boad, Montreal 248, Quebec, Canada.
ASSOC IA TION BRANCHES
OTTAWA
ftlr.M.Iveson I Sect1y., P.O.Box 352, Te:rmlnal ItAt! Ottawa Onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN Mr. Donald W.Soafe 12407 Lansdowne D:r1ve, Apt. 101, Edmonton Alta.
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVE!3
OTTAA VALLEY
SASKATCHE..rAN
PACIlIC COAST
FAR EAST
BRITISH ISLES
NANITOBA
ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. J,67 Somerset St • …, Ottawa, Ontario.
J.S.Nlcholoson, 2)06 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Peter Cox, 609 Cottonwood Ave., Coqultlam. Brltish Columbia.
oJ. D. McKeown. 6-7, 4-chome. Yams te-cho, Sui ta Ci ty, Osaka, Japan.
J.H.Sanders, 67 l,.jillow Way, Ampth1ll, Beds., England,
K.G.Younger, 267 Vernon Road, r.innipeg, r.an1toba.
i1r. Donald W.Scafe.12407 Lansdowne Dr1ve, Apt. lOl.Edmonton Alta.
Copyright 1970 Pr1nted in Canada on Canad1an paper.

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