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Canadian Rail 220 1970

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Canadian Rail 220 1970

:NO. 220
.A.P~XL 1..970
r
1~·.
..
CARS OF THE
WINNIPEG ELECTRIC
+
RAILWAY
1955
George Harris
Editors note: CANADIAN RAIL
is very pleased to present
part II of the story of Win­
nipeg Electric Railways st­
reet cars, the first part of
which was published in the
July-August issue (no. 212).
Along in the early years of the century, it was
decided by the Winnipeg Electric Railway Com­
pany that it would be more profitable to de­
velop a home building programme. There were
several reasons for this. Winnipegs compara­
tively isolated position made it very expen­
sive to ship in cars and parts from the fac­
tories of established street car builders in
the east. Rather loosely-defined labor laws
allowed a good deal of leeway in the employ­
ment of help in the off-season. Another fac­
tor lIaS the extreme in temperature reached
during prairie ,linters. Cars needed to be ra­
ther specially built to withstand such severe
cold.
Apparently,a study was made of the cars already imported
a design was adopted utilizing features from both the ottawa
Toronto types of cars. It is possible,too,that emissaries
sent to observe the car-building programme of the Twin Cities
sit (Minneapolis-st.Paul,Minn.),as the Minneapolis car shops
been building cold-climate cars successfully since 1899 •
.. . .
and
and
were
Tran­
had
1~.E.Co. Sweeper no. 9,turning the corner of Kelvin-Johnson streets,on a
cold day in January,1950 Photo courtesy Geo. Harris.
47-foot motor car (Peter Witt) of December,1922,produced at the Mon­
treal Works of the Canadian Car & Foundry Company for the Toronto Trans-
portation Commission. C.R.H.A.Archives.
Morse Place car,waiting at the end of its run,at Broadway Bnd Osborne
in Dgcember,1950. Photo Stan Styles: Geo. Harris Collection •
. .. .
There is a little doubt as to where the first few home buIlt
cars were assembled, but it was probably at the Main Street Barn.The
very first lot were a series of double-truck, open cars and this
would have been mainly an assembly of parts. The record states that
the actual shops ~ere not in use until 1906. There had been a con­
siderable acreage acquired in South Hinnipeg,adjacent to the Can­
ad ian Northern Railvlay yards and it ~[as on this property that the
permanent shops and the big south Barn were erected. It was here
that future car-building and heavy repairs were done until nearly
the end of the street Car era.
The first two cars built from scratch were a pair of suburb­
ans for the Head ingly line. They were good -s ized Vlooden comb ines ,
built extra-wide and with rattan cross-seats. These ,ere closely
followed by a series of 9-windml cars,s1milar in pattern to the
dOUble-end,double-truck cars already in hand from Toronto and ot­
tawa.
The materials used in the general car structure v[ere oak or
B.C.fir underframes,with ash posts and braces. The interior was
finished in maple or birch, with cherry used as a finishing sheath­
ing on the outside. There las some variation through the years, as
some woods became rather scarce as time went on.
Like most city transit systems that became home bUilders,
the Hinnipeg Electric developed a classic design before long.How­
ever, this was not before cars were extended to a length of 10 win­
dows and 44-seated passenger capacity. It ,~as very soon dec ided to
drop. the double-end style of car. The typical car Tas 45 feet 4 in­
ches long,over bumpers, with a deep rear vestibule and a short front
one. At first,the rear vestibule or platform lias open to the load­
ing side, with a vertical and horizontal pipe arrangement, to act as
a guide for incoming and outgoing passengers, On this platform the
CANADIAN
109
R A I L
conductor took his stand, while passing through the heavy loading
areas of downtown vlinnipeg. Indeed a cold spot in winter, the mo­
tormans vestibule was separated from the main body of the car by
a sliding door,as TaS the rear vestibule. In the front compartment
or motormans vestibule were of course the operating controls and
the Baker heater, with its coal hopper. This essential app~atus
heated the car through ducts under the side seats. All city cars
had long side-seats and were first built for two-man operation.
It was not until the Pay As You Enter (PAYE) system was
adopted in 1913-14 that the rear vestibules were actually closed in
by wooden doors or gates. These were manually operated by the con­
ductor,who sat or stood by the farebox. It is worth remarking here
that cars from 658 to 692 were actually built for PAYE operation ,
and had a
rather extended front vestibule and included a front
exit door, operated by the motorman. It was not until the later 20s
that many cars were converted to one-man operation. At this time
air-operated doors and treadles were installed. Another conversion
that some of these cars underwent was remounting on 26-inch wheels,
making them low-floor vehicles. This occurred in 1919-1920.
It would be neater to be able to state that all cars were e­
quipped with Brill trucks,as the greater number actually were.How­
ever, there were a congiderable number of the earlier ones with
Curtis trucks and there were quite a few Baldwin & McGuire-Cum­
mings trucks used. The standard wheel diameter was 33 inches and
….
This car was the first of 20,bought from the Minneapolis,Minn. system,to
replace cars lost in the 1920 carbarn fire. These were surplus to the
Twin Cities Rapid Transit Company,at that time. Only the bodies were pur-
chased. Photo courtesy Geo. Harris •
. ——-~-.,
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BECAME STANDA~D WpG 10 WINDOWED CARS.
LAST OPE.NS -SLT WITI-/ CE.NTRE CORRIl>O~ If: FoOrBOARDS.
I
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, ALL STEI!L CONST-BOTH CROSS t S/PE SEATS.
SIMIL.AR To ABove: -STEEL SHEATHED OfIJL.¥
TOOL..ON~ ,:oR AYE:RAG~ CuItYI!S· 55 6
IMPO~TE.D AF:oT~~ CAR 8ARN FII~~ -NO T~VC1<~ •.
BL.T To BIRNE Y P4T. FOR STu.3 LINES
ONL.Y 10 YR. USE
OUT OF SERVICE: DE. CARS RES eli SHOPS IQU FoR, SueURBAN use:
.. II 1 I q 15 ., STLlI3 c.rN E.
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OPf!.N T~AIL.~R~ _ SOt.t> TO B~ANDON sr RY-,ql~
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CANADIAN
112
R A I L
II M~GrUIRE~CUMMINCiS SWEEPERS,2-6 LOST IN IQlo FI~E,
D·T SWEE.PER.cURTIS HEAVy TRUCKS
S·T If -ALI. BUT (6 REBUIL.T F=ROMI 2-6.
D·T ROTARY. eLADE.S 80TH eNns,
p·T DoE. SPRIN LE: R. •
II MCTOR FL.AT GAJ;t
II WITH Pl.OW 4 SP~AtlEI:t.·
llER~I<: jl
• ~EPAlre t LIN/:.
STEEPLE. CAB 6 …. 5 WORkS LOCO
S-T RAIL HVNDE~~ E..X PASS.O~·O~I D·T SANt> A~5,. ..
1/ wReel( CAR n
D-E REB AS IN5T. ~AR WITH PA~S CAR ROOF -(HEAPINGLY)
there were fully one-third of the fleet always remained 2-man
high cars. This was due to the fact that the Portage Avenue -Main
route was always the heaviest traffic route.
PAINT SCHEME.
I find at this stage, that my descriptive remarks .,ould pro-
bably classify more clearly under a series of headings and so will
begin under IIPaint SCheme. The original colour of Winnipeg-built
cars was of varnished cherrywood,with gilt numbers and trlin, sim-
ilar to Canadian Pacific Railway coaches of the time. ~lorld War I
brought about a scarc ity of cherry /ood and therefore repa irs and
new .lork was done in basswood,llhich did not lend itself readily to.
a
natural finish. So, imitating the C.P.R. again,a maroon paint sch­
eme became standard. This lasted until the middle 20s.
About that time, it was observed that the maroon colour became
too drab-looking too soon. So the pendulum s,lung the other way. As
the carS came fresh from the paint shop, they were a canary yellow
with cream trim and a band of light green under the windo, line.
The yellow did not last too well, however, and soon looked smudgy
and
unattractive. An orange colour was tried. This proved out sa­
tisfactorily and became the basic colour for all Transit vehicles.
For a time,aluminum paint was used for roOfs,which combination ma­
de a
very attractive unit, -bright without being garish,weathering
well and being very visible in traffic.
From a safety meeting came a suggestion from an operator.Hith
all car doors painted a maroon colour, it was hard to tell which
doors belonged to which car,qhen a line of cars were drawn up at
a loading platform or island, -that is, from the motormans rear-
CANADIAN
1.IlC
1ORONTO Ry CQ ,
O.C.<:!
OTTWA CA~ ce
W·«.C!
WINI4IPEG e:I.EC. ~~
T.C.~ • ..,.
TWIN C/eO RAP.TIi!ANs
C4M!A~-C4NADIAN C.AR. •
113
R A I L
PA S. CARS -86.106- ,a-SQ-,2.
1/.0~~/2~~6-2.1e-ltl~2J8
33~·:J6e-~e-4q2. •
S2.4.$~. -581
564–586-568
2.qo … ~8o-386 t ….. 66-4-76
GcO HA~R.IS. c:.-I ·7<.
view mirror1 It was suggested that the upper half of the front
doors on all cars be painted a cream colour,to provide the desired
contrast.
. ., .
Winnipeg Electric Line Car No. 48 in the North Car Yard on December 30,
1950. Photo co~rt8sy Gao. Harris.
Winnipeg Electric Ottawa-built car number 734 at the corner of Kelvin
and Hespeler in January,1950. Photo courtesy Geo. Harris •
.. . .
JNSPECTIONS.
All cars in general use worked under a rotating inspection
schedule. Using this schedule, the time factor, rather than mileage,
was considered better for determining inspection periods. Every 4
days,a unit underwent a light inspection; every 8 days, a heavy
inspection and every 4 years,a complete overhaul.
When a car came in at night, the Barn Super intendent had a
list of those cars due for inspection. A crew of 12 men prepared
it for the next days run, taking care of the sweeping, dusting, win­
dow cleaning, etc. Mechanics went over the controller,motors, air­
compressor,brake cylinders. An oiler went over motors and axles.
Minor defects on report by the operator were repaired or adjusted.
Heavy inspection consisted of a thorough check of car body and tr­
ucks,trolley-pole wheel and base. At the complete overhaul inter­
val,a car would be stripped down, trucks removed, gears rejuvenated,
and the body would be painted inside and out.
REBUILDS.
perhaps the most consistently rebuilt class of cars on the sys­
tem were the old 9-windowed,narrow,double-ended cars. These were
acquired from various builders and some, even, were company-built.As
time went on, they became more and more stub-line or rush-hour cars
and as buses came into more cOllllllon use, there 1ere more and more of
them left standing in the barn.
In 1918,eleven of these cars were mounted on light, motorless
Curtis trucks and with 26-inch wheels, they became low-mounted,rush­
hour trailers. Unfortunately, there were no low-mounted powercars
CANADIAN
115
R A I L
available for them at the time, so while useful enough, they made ra­
ther an insignificant appearance in the street, being pulled along
by a high mounted car. They l~ere eventually renumbered into a
500-odd ser ies and Sa11 about a decade of serv ice.
In March,1924,another 7 were rebuilt to one-man suburban cars.
They Tere both widened a bit and their vestibules were lengthened.
They Tere given cross rattan seats, fitted with Brill 27Gl trucks,
renumbered into a l200-ser ies. They sa, intermittent use until the
early1930
l
s,when they were generally displaced by buses •
Winnipeg Electric Company­
built car no. 798 -1928.
The long car,-53 feet 6
inches. Photo Geo. Harris.
,
• • •
.Car no. 106 on Broadway-1905.
Last of the Dinkeys. Built
Toronto 1903. One of 18 cars
destroyed in the April,1920
carbarn fire. Shows the Slee­
man Fender,typical of Winni­
peg Emectric for many years.
Photo Manitoba Archives •
.I.. Car no. 1410 on Arlington St.
in July,1936. Old converted
double-end car.
Photo Geo. Harris.
,.
1
BUILT BY _____________ ORDER NO. ________ YEAR _____ COST ___ rC-_C, ___ _/__-_~ __
CLASS PLATFORMS WIDTHS Ft. In. HEICHTS Ft. In. LENGTHS Ft. In.
Cloaed Open Cla.ed Over sm. Botto, Sill Plate to top of Roof Over Body __ ++_
Open Front H Window Posh Rail to top o(~–01 D …. hera
Rear II Water Table. Bu:Cm=p.=,::-.-I–t—1
TruckC.;;i,;;—
~::~:::::~S:E:A:T=IN=G~=C=A:P:A~C~IT=-:Y=~::::::~: l======~-H-EA-TLE,RS~-::-::-::-=–=–=-~~~-__ M __ -_ __ ~k-.!:C~O;U-;P;L!:E~RS~-=-~-=-_Ir.=ii~;;;~·:;::–v,,, … ,,,;b:::U:::I.-j:~;j~i-: -t–t-I
1~se.U ~ Typo ,I P … enc
era
-;i-+-+–I
~:!tudin.lT–~~~h~;;orn Rail ~::t :~~–r–t-I
hN::-oWo:~N,~O.O:::!L.i~dT.:-t–C,U,R,,T-J AII_N~S~~–:fl-::.N:;u~m:1F:::~:::~,–P:E:RS~~=:~==:-S~T~E~P~S~_-~_-+/~~~-~~7!_&_S_TE_P_. M_AC_H_+-_S_A_N_D_-+;TMy:-pe~~,-M_P_RES __ S_O_R_
Moke Front
Re …
TRUCKS_ MAKE WHEEL BASE TRUCK, Order No. _ COST _ YEAR_
BRAKES WHEELS
1 ____ –+ ______ ————+–_________ +-D~I:.~m:::·7W~.=HO·iiF~;t,,·-+————~—=–=—–1
I .. Caar Fit.
—–r—~-t———r———–+—.;-i:Mi:o~t:o::-i, B..:,=-•. –1—-
Journal
ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT
MOTORS _ • __________ YEAR COST _________ _
PINIONS
___ TEETH GEAR-__ TEETH CONTROLLER No. ____ TYPE _____________ _
RESISTANCE HDLlGHT _______ . _______ CIRCUIT BREAKER __ _
LIGHTS~________________ _ ____________ ~~~~———
FUSE BOX _______________ LIGHTNING ARRESTEIL___ _ ____ AUTOMOTONEER ______ _
CAR SIGNS _______ . _______________________ TROLLEY BASE _____ TROLLEY CATCHE~
eHANGG£~~S ___________________________________________________ _
I
WEIGIITS LBS.
COMPRESSOR CRADLE
—–·——·———+–~I
——————
TOTAL APPROX. WEIGHT
CA NAOIAN 117 R A I L
Finally,at about the same tline,all of the series that remained,
22 cars -except one -were converted to one-man stub-line cars.The
one exception was rebuilt and retained as the sole remaining dou­
ble-end instruction car,No. 200. The others ,.,.ere left vlith side­
seats, but vlere fitted with operator-controlled doors arid ere
metal-sheathed at this time. They Iere given the same trucks and
pm/er
equipment as the 1200s,but vlere renumbered as lL~OOs. Some
of these veterans were standing around,-in use and out of use, as
recently as right up to 19551
CAR NO. 798 •
This car creates for me an interesting little saga of its own
and some,.,hat v/Orth ment,ioning. No. 798 was built in 1928 in the
Company shops and was actually a woden car with steel sheathing •
Its appearance then was similar to other cars of the 700-deries,ex­
cept for its extreme length of 53 feet 6 inches. It soon proved to
be a leJOOn or. this account. Standard curves on the system were
built for cars 45 feet long and much time was wasted in ill-chosen
meets. It ,.,.as also under-motored.
In addition to these drallbacks, it was found that although it
would seat 66 passengers, 75% of the time only 25% of the seats we­
re occupied. This in itself was no recommendation for building
this type in large numbers. So, although No. 798 .ras one of the
4 cars featured on the Last Run occasion in September, 1955, it
was never repeated. As such,Car No. 798 marked a period or wa-
ter-shed in street railway transport evolution. It proved that
mere bigness does not necessarily mean greater efficiency. It
always carried a sign, placed near the control box so that it could
not be overlooked by the operator -CAR LENGTH 53 FEET 6 mCRES 1
In concluding this article, it would be informative to remark
that,of the entire Winnipeg Electric Company roster, some 226 units
or 72% were home-built. This figure does not include a dozen
heavy wooden interurban cars for the Selkirk line or the con-
siderable stock of service equipment. The record states that there
were,during 1930-31,some 246 men, variously engaged in overhauling
101 cars in a JOOdernization programme. One factor contributing to
this figure probably was the wish on the part of Company manage­
ment to prolong staff employment as much as possible, through the
years of the depression.
Finally, I do not know whether or not it reflects a lack of
sentimentality in the City of Winnipeg, but there does not appear
to be one single, solitary street car or piece of rolling stock of
any kind preserved as a remembrance of the Winnipeg Electric Com­
pany. There could have been something selected from all the cars
there used to be and there is still the chance of resurrecting one
from out on suburban farms or various other places. But as time
goes on,-and nearly fifteen years have now passed since streetcar
service ceased, the opportunities are getting very scarce indeed.

TllJRBOS TBOUBLIS
S .s .Vlorthen
~J
~ ubsequent to the withdrawal from service
of Canadian National1s remarkable TURBO,
many and varied were the speculations
and conjectures as to what really neces­
sitated this action. Among the railway
hobbyists,the interest was intense. It
was naturally of equal or greater concern
to United Aircraft of Canada,since they
had designed this most revolutionary trans­
portation mode.
Early speculations about TURBOs troubles included dis­
cussion of everyone of the components,from the ST-6 power-plant
to the hydraulic suspension system. Rumors notWithstanding, UAC
maintained a discrete silence,saying only that remedial action
was being taken and as soon as the train sets were repaired and
back in service,information on necessary modifications would be
made public.
It is extremely unlikely that the power-plant was defic­
ient. As power-plants gO,the ST-6 and its ancestor the PT-6 have
. undergone more than 50,000 hours of testing and have benefitted
from the expenditure of more than $ 50 million in development and
research costs. Moreover,the ST-6 has a wide application and has
been successfully fitted to both land and water vehicles. It is
used in racing boats,landing craft,patrol boats and a personne1-
carrier for the United States Navy,scheduled for service early in
1969. On land,the ST-6 was the power-plant for three Indianapolis
racing cars in 1968,all of which qualified for the race and one of
which holds the current track record at Indy. The ST-6 is also
being tried out in snow-plows in the Canadian Rockies,wood-chip­
ping machines for Canada1s mammoth pulp and paper industry and
elsewhere. It is a very versatile power-plant 1
Vlhat did contribute to TURBOls troubles was the effect of
below-zero temperatures on the component systems,which responded
to the cold. The hydraulic systems,the electrically-actuated val­
ves and sWitches,the air or l~quid-operated controls and,last but
by no means least,the Circulating water systems,all reacted badly.
As soon as the weather got really cold,and it did just that, Sh­
ortly after TURBOls introduction in December,1968,the oil in the
hydraulic transmissions stiffened up,resulting in slower respon­
ses to acceleration and deceleration commands. MOisture conden­
sed in air-operated systems,Oil thickened in valve assemblies,
and the resulting overloaded electrical systems kicked out re­
lays and shut down auxiliary facilities. Snow and blowing snow
sifted into recessed door assemblies and prevented rapid. and com­
plete door clOSing. And to top it all off,under-floor water and
effluent lines congealed and froze, caus ing pumps to overload and
CANADIAN
120
R A I L
burn .out, thus depriving the train-sets .of essential
facilities.
passenger
All .of these pr.oblems were n.ot immediately detected. M.ost
.of them resulted in .observable effects,such as electrical and hea­
ting failures, speed and schedule-time reducti.ons and p.ower-plant
shutdowns. Canadian Nati.onal was justifiably very c.oncerned, n.ot
.only
for passenger c.omf.ort but als.o f.or lI.on_timell perf.ormance.Due
t.o the imp.ortance .of traffic patterns .on the heavily-travelled
M.ontreal-T.or.ont.o main line,already semi-c.omputerized,significant
delays and train failures c.ould upset the entire pr.ogramme, n.ot
.only
delaying .other TURBOs, but RAPIDOs,piggy-back h.ot-sh.ots and
fast thr.ough-freights,as well.
As a result, the decisi.on t.o terminate TURBO, albeit tem­
p.orarily,was taken with great reluctance. Immediately thereafter,
crews fr.om United Aircraft C.ompany in Longueuil,just acr.oss the
river fr.om M.ontreal,came t.o Track 6 in CNs Central station,where
the maintenance facilities f.or TURBO had been previ.ously estab­
lished. They immediately began the installati.on .of detecting in­
strumentati.on .on .one train set. These instruments were intended
t.o tell UACs engineers exactly what was happening t.o TURBOs var­
i.ous systems,during the c.old weather. Thus,pr.oblems c.ould be de­
tected,tr.ouble sp.ots c.ould be pinp.ointed and appr.opriate c.orrect­
i.ons c.ould be made. Late in January,1969,.one fully-instrumented
TURBO was nearly ready t.o begin the diagn.osis .of TURBOs tr.oub­
les. It was sitting .on jacks in Track 6,lifted t.o a height which
permitted easy access t.o underneath l.ocati.ons. One day, a diesel
yard switcher,m.oving a sec.ond TURBO train-set int.o Track 6, ac­
cidentally came int.o c.ollisi.on with the set .on jacks, causing it
t.o fall fr.om the jacks t.o the track. This effectively put the
newly-instrumented set .out .of circulati.on. Still determined t.o
beat the bad-luck jinx,DACs crews immediately began t.o instru­
ment a sec.ond set,t.o carry .out the essential tests.
The sec.ond TURBO set, equipped with the necessary sensing
instruments, was ready early in February and all systems were g.o.
But n.o s.o.oner was the pr.ogramme ready t.o start than the weather
began t.o warm up! Temperatures which had f.ormerly trended t.o the
zer.o mark .or below nOW climbed int.o the balmier ranges.of the
twenties and UACs engineers were temp.orarily utterly frustrated.
Undaunted,they at .once decided t.o g.o looking f.or c.older weather,
and .on February l3,the instrumented train-set passed thr.ough Ot­
tawa,.on its search f.or c.old weather. N.orthward they went t.o Can­
adas ice-b.ox,.over CNs main line t.o H.ornepayne and Longlac,Ont,
There,they f.ound the lost c.old weather and at .once began genera­
ting the inf.ormati.on necessary t.o the c.orrecti.on .of TURBOs tr­
.oubles,
With the essential inf.ormati.on n.ow at hand,it was .only
a
matter .of interpreting it and making the necessary c.orrecti.ons
and modificati.ons t.o the seven TURBO train-sets •. But this c.ould
n.ot be c.ompleted
in a matter .of weeks and, in Mar·ch, UAC ann.ounced
that it w.ould be f.our t.o five m.onths bef.ore the m.odificati.ons .or
c.orrecti.ons c.ould be c.ompleted and TURBO service rest.ored, It
CANADIAN
121
R A I L
llas equally logical that Canadian National would not agree to
resumption of TURBO service before a sufficient number af train­
sets were avaiiable to provide at least one Montreal-Toronto TUR­
BO service diily,-and on-time 1
It should be recognized that engineering and design ph-
ilosophies in the latter half of the Twentieth Century do not
admit over-designing. Since projected operating conditions are
based on average situations, the eventuation of extraordinary con­
ditions may result in operational failures simply because the en­
gineering and design conditions were not anticipated to include
these extremes in parameters. Now,however,design and engineering
considerations for TURBO do include these extremes and it is al­
most certain that the wintry winds of future Januarys will not
interfere llith TURBOs operation.
Suddenly last summer, the calm of an otherwise uneventful
summers afternoon was irrevocably shattered. Wednesday, July 30th.
1969,was just like any other summer o[ednesday. Montreal radio-sta­
tion C J A Ds traffic-watching helicopter left its pad at the In­
ternational Airport about 4 p.m., preparatory to dOing its daily
thing of guiding Montreals maniac motorists through the complexi­
ties of the afternoon rush-hour. Road traffic was just about normal
for the time of day.
The trafficopter was eggbeating its way towards do~mtown
Montreal, examining Highways 2 & 20 along the Lakeshore, Ihere they
are closely paralle[ed by the main lines of both CP RAIL and Can­
adian National Railways. The men in the copter nearly flipped wh­
en they saw a long,grey,streamlined,high-speed caterpillar-like
shape scooting along CNs rails, munching up the miles to Central
Station. Within seconds, they had identified it as TURBO,-or at
least one set of United Aircraft Companys Fabulous Five. The panic
was then officially on!
C J A D lost no time in informing housebound and home­
ward
-bound Montrealers that TURBO was back and that it wouldnt be
long before Montreal-Toronto travellers would once again be able
to avoid miXed-up Malton (airport) by riding the speedster. This
ne~lS ~laS thereupon picked up by other media. C B C and Canadian
Press were on the phone before you could say all aboard and
CNs
Headquarters PR Department in Montreal was caught more than
a litt le unprepared, on the rece iving end of a barrage of inquiries
which had not abated one bit by the first week in August.It seemed
as though everyone was definitely interested in TURBO and when it
would be back in service,-even after a very quiet interval of
eight long months.
Completion of the necessary modifications to one TURBO
train set, -number 5 of 5, designated as the prototype by UAC,
pleaded a trial run to verify the predicted performance.This was
however a little out of line,as it was July and not January. There
was the argument that the sooner the thing could be made to work,
the sooner it could go back into revenue service and the sooner the
rent would start coming in again.
CANADIAN
122
R A I L
But before CN reintroduces TURBO service,a number of
very important and serious decisions will have to be made.First on
the list of decisions,will be the one which authorizes the modifi­
cation of at least two of the five sets which will be necessary to
cope with one TURBO schedule in the time table. The next decision
will include a renegotiated maintenance contract. UACs estimates
seem to have been on the low side and they are now suggesting a re­
view of the terms. The first decision will be based on winter-time
tests scheduled to occur in January-March,1970. Readers of Forster
Kemps OBSERVATIONS will have learned of the most recent activity
in this area.
While reintroduction of TURBO is being considered in a
manner
,,,hich might be described as carefully and cautiously, the
concept is by no means languishing. vlith one TURBO trainset l)ow
modified anq operational,already there is much talk about the re­
duced noise levels and improved riding characteristics.
Add to these improvements the degree of public inter­
est which still exists and can be aroused by one TURBO appearance
on one summer day and it must be concluded that the popularity of
this modern transportation mode is a long way from having disap­
peared,as some of the critics would have you thinkl
…..
UNITED AIRCRAFTs ST-6G power package,-one of five in each seven-car
trainset,installed in the flank of one of TURBOs power cars.
Photo courtesy Canadian National Railways.
NEW BOOKS ABOUT
OLD RAILWAYS
S.S .~lorthen.
CANADAS RAILWAYS: Phillips,R.A.J. (CANADA AT HORK Series)
McGraw Hill Company of Canada,Ltd.,Toronto,Ont.
122 pp. 42 illus. 6 sketches 1 map ca. 7 x 10
$ 4.35
1968
The publishers biography of the author says that Mr. Phillips
career has been primarily in government departmental service. In
1965,he was appointed to the Secretariat of the Privy Council Of­
fice,Government of Canada,to coordinate anti-poverty programmes
among other things.Mr. Phillips competence to write about Cana­
dian railways is not readily understood. On other subjects, Mr.
Phillips has published four titles, dealing iith Canada r s northern
areas and the East Block of the Parliament Buildings at Ottawa.His
nodding acquaintance with Canadian railway history may be respon­
sible for the following misconceptions:
-the Lanoraie and Village dIndustrie Railway was
for summer use;
-the Northern Railway to Collingwood on Lake Huron
in 1855 was the only link with the Canad ian west
unt 11 the coming of the C.P oR . ;
-the builders of the Grand Trunk were inexperienced;
-the summit of Kicking Horse Pass is at Lake Louise
stat ion;
CANADJAN
124
R A I L
-Sandford Fleming sent a telegram to the Directors of
the C.P.R. assuring them that the Rogers Pass was a
satisfactory route;
-there were colonist cars on the first train from Mon­
treal to Vancouver on June 28,1886;
-Steam locomotive No. 40,presently at the Museum of
Science and Technology,Ottawa,was a Grand Trunk
western locomotive of the 1880s;
-the worlds nearest fulfillment of an absolutely
straight railway track,with few undulations, is in
Argentina,where there are 205 miles, straight and
level.
The list of errors pertaining to historic and present-day railways
and railway happenings could be continued. While the book is very
readable, the illustrations are mostly muddy and sometimes black.The
account terminates with a rather lengthy extract from Stephen Lea­
cocks work, The Train to Mariposa and provides what might be con­
sidered as a very flatulent conclusion to a frivolous book. Not of
interest to the serious railway enthusiast and anathema to the ser­
ious railway historian, it is disheartening to conclude that this
addition to the CANADA AT WORK series will likely find its way into
a large number of Canadian grade school and high school libraries,
for the misinformation of students for years to Come. The book is
well bound,so that the possibility of its rapid d,isintegration in
the hands of its readers is remote.

CANADIAN NATIONAL srEAM POWER: Clegg, Anthony & Corley,Raymond
Pre-pre-publication $ 7.95 Pre-publication $ 8.95 Canadian Nation­
al employees $ 9.95 Present price $ 12.95.
Trains & Trolleys,Box 1434, station B,Montreal 110,Canada. 1969
128
pp. 38 pp. 1l1us. 123 tables 22 drwgs. 4 charts 1 lMP ca.9×12
This long-awaited book, somewhat expensive by todays standards, is
attractively bound in Canadian National Railways traditional green
and gold, in what must be a dimension unacceptable to most book sh­
elves. The text is neatly and precisely written and the photographs
are,in the main, excellently reproduced. They are generally not the
conventional builders or company pictures, but most of the single­
engine photographs are faintly reminiscent of posed builders shots
despite the fact that the engines are unmistakably in steam.
It should be firmly kept in mind that the subject of this book
is steam locomotives of Canadian National Railways,an organization
which began in 1923. The reader should not therefore be d isappoint­
ed if he does not find his favourite Canadian Northern or Great
western Railway engine illustrated in its original paint scheme or
lettering.
The table of contents is detailed ·and explicit,but is in very
hard-to-read type size, compared with the text and the table·s,as is
. the list of abbreviations used in the book, which appears on the
very last page. In the Foreword,the authors remind the reader that
the book exists due to the perSistence and ability of Anthony Cl-
CANADIAN 125
R A I L
egg to make his idea a reality….. ,while the part icular talents
of Ray Corley in the field of equipment history have provided the
detailed roster and statistical analyses. This is a precise state­
ment of fact and had the publishers of the work commissioned the
compilation (it cannot be described otherwise),they could have done no
better than to have selected these two gentlemen for the job.The
result of the authors devotion to their subject is,without ques­
tion,a definitive ~ork,which puts in order a hitherto very untidy
aspect of Company and Canadian railway history.
CANADIAN NATIONAL srEAM POWER is a book for railway statis­
ticLans primarily and CN enthusiasts secondarily, since the history
of the Company, per se,is not within the scope of the book.However,
if you want to know what happened to the engines of the Quebec,Mon­
treal & Southern,or the Atlantic Quebec and Western ~to name only
two little-known constituent companies ),when CN was awardedthese
lines,you can find this information with a little persistence. A
santa Claus of unknown wheel-arrangement makes the scene on page 69.
Some of the other decorations and photographs have appeared
hitherto in the pages of CANADIAN RAIL. Imitation is the most sin­
cere form of flattery.
The book is divided neatly into four main parts: the status of
steam power when Canadian National was formed; the roster of CNs
steam zootive pm~er; t)1e Annual stock Summaries of steam locomo-
tives and finally, the System Assignments of steam engines. The
tables,in some instances,are curious combinations of typewritten
and handwritten figures in one or more colours,-red entries de­
signating debit entries and the presence of so many figures in ty­
pewritten characters, rather than conventional printing type,may be
disturbing to some readers.
For the ra ilway enthus iast in Canada and e Iserhe re, who has
been waiting for and wanting such an accurate and detailed compil­
ation, the advent of CANADIAN NATIONAL srEAM POwm will be the occa­
sion of great rejoicing. Please read the directions carefully before
consulting the tables.
TRAINS & TROLLEYS is a second-generation model of the three­
man Trains & Trolleys Book Club, which was organized by members of
the Canadian Railroad Historical Association,prior to 1966. The
purpose of this organization was to publish definitive works on
various aspects of Canadian railways and their histories. DELORI­
MnR & ANGUS, SELF-PROPELLED CARS OF THE C.N oR. and CATENARY
THROUGH THE COUNTIES are some of the titles which resulted from
this arrangement. After 1966,Trains and Trolleys Book Club was re­
titled ClassiC Era Press,which,for a time,performed certain pub­
lishing and associated functions for the CoR.H.A. However, this
relationship was terminated shortly thereafter and the present TR­
AINS & TROLLEYS organization,now expanded to a five-man director­
ate,is not connected with the Canadian Railroad Historical Assoc­
iation.
CANADIAN
126
R A I L
THOMAS BRASSEY,RAILWAY BUILDER: Walker,Chas.
Frederick Muller Ltd.,Fleet Street,London E.C.4,England.
183 pp. 12 pp. illus. 4 maps. ca. 6 x 9 $
7.50
1969
The information from the publisher on the jacket of this book con­
tains the statement that no biography of Thomas Brassey has ap­
peared since 1872 and readers will welcome this modern look at a
Victorian giant. The portion of the book which is special interest
to Canadian readers is the 14-page chapter dealing with Thomas
Brassey1s association with the construction of the Grand Trunk
Railway in the period 1853-56. Brasseys involvement with this en­
terprise was through his membership in the English railway con­
tracting firm of Peto,Brassey,Jackson and Betts.
The author,Mr. Walker, describes the proposed line of the Gr­
and Trunk as running over largely unsettled, unpopulated country,
including virgin forest, for some two-thirds of its length. And
further, after some criticism of the Canada of the time, the then­
Canadian government and personages such as Sir Alexander T. Galt
(his mot1ve was partly profit and partly prestige) and Francis
Hincks (his motives were political),the author approaches the end
of this section of his work with the following summary:
It must be said in fairness that the feat of
building the railway was a magnificent one and
one that should not b~ minimized. It ranked as
one of the engineering wonders of the 19th.cen-
CANADIAN
127
R A I L
tury,for all its lack of financial success and
was a
work of vision and enterprise. But as we
have seen,it left a legacy of bitterness among
Canadians,for many of them felt that their
young country had been the victim of a shabby
confidence trick and the contractors were lar­
gely blamed. As recent as 1957,a book publish-
ed by the University of Toronto Press, THE
GRAND TRUNK RAIIMAY OF CANADA,by A.Vl.Currie,re­
vived and re-appraised some of the old charges
and counter-charges •••••.•••••.•• .
The author,Mr. Charles Walker, the deputy-headmaster of a War­
wickshire grammar school, is more to be pitied than censured. He
would have done well to Consult Colonel stevens r tltO-volume work
on Canadian National Railways. As for the remainder of Walkers
book,it is very readable and of great interest, but deals with
Brasseys career in Great Britain,France,Denmark,assorted Italian
and Austrian states and principalities, the Crimea and India. Mr.
Brassey las a man of many parts, of Ihich one was a 363-mile long
railway through the forests of British North America,in the con­
struction of llhich, together with his associates, he is said to
have contributed $ 5,000,000 unwittingly to the Canadian people.
All in all,it -las a sorry business, says the author. The Great
Grand Trunk Railway Mystery is still no nearer explanation. Mr.
Walkers book,-or more properly one chapter of it, throws no new
light on this ancient enigma.
SOURCES OF
RAILWAY INFORMATION
IN THE
ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES OU CANADA PUBLIC ARCHIVES OF CANADA
CANAOA
John Beslarick Thompson.
CANADIAN RAIL is privileged to present
another article by Mr. John B. Thomp­son,who
has made previous contributions
to early Canadian railway history. Mr.
Thompson is presently Staff Historian ,
National Historic Sites Service,Ottawa,
Canada.
The author wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to Mr. Brian
Hallett of the Public Archives of Canada,for his assistance in
the preparation of this study.
Although much has been written about Canadian railways in the
past,much remains to be written in the future. For anyone desiring
to research the history of a Canadian railway, the Public Archives
of Canada in ottawa provide a wealth of primary source material,
well worth investigating.
There are several drawbacks facing the railway historian be­
fore he begins his investigation. The railway records are not con­
solidated,but are included in many different groups of records and
manuscripts. In some cases,only the briefest of indexes have been
prepared to aid the researcher in finding desired material. How­
ever,the helpful staff of the Public Archives spare no effort in
assisting legitimate researchers and,in order to help those who
may wish to investigate a certain railway,the following is a sum­
mary
of sources available:
Record Group l,Section E 6
One linear foot of records of the Board of Railway
Commissioners,the body which administered railway matters
for the Government of the Province of Canada,from the be-
-..
THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES OF CANADA,on Wellington ~treet in Ottawa,are div~ded
into 4 divisions: The Public Archives Library,the Manuscript Division,the
Picture Division and the Map Division,open 8.30 am to 4.50 pm Monday to
Friday,except in summer,when closing time is 4.10 pm.
CANADIAN 129 R A I L
ginning of Canadas railway boom in 1851 to the time of
Confederation (1867). Letters received and sent, minutes
of meetings and reports are all included in this group
of records, which contain valuable information for those
researchers interested in lines built in Canadas first
railway era.
Record Group 11, Series III
This is a collection of records from the Department
of public Works which, in addition to building asylums and
court houses,-as well as roads,also had a finger or two
in the railway pie!
Volumes 191 and 473-5 contain scattered letters per­
taining to early railways,from the Buffalo,Brantford and
Goderich to the Tr~ee Rivers & Arthabasca. An interesting
list of early locomotives owned by the Grand Trunk Rail­
way, during and after its construction,is also among these
records.
Volumes 456 and 732-40 concern the Intercolonial
RailNay and include estimates, reports and letters received
and sent by officials of that line between 1867 and 1877.
Sir Sandford Flemings letterbooks are amongst these re­
cords.
Also worthwhile examining are the Registers of Pa­
pers filed with the Railway Branch of the Department of
Public >lorks (1867-79),Volumes 679-82.
An inventory of this entire Record Group has re­
cently been prepared and is readily available to the re­
searcher. With it,the specific information desired can
be found more easily in this Record Group which contains
rather fragmentary railway material.
Record Group 19
Although there are a few railway items in this Rec­
ord Group,-the papers of the Department of Fihance,these
papers are not very available due to a reorganization of
the material currently being undertaken by the staff of
the Public Archives.
Record Group 30
This is the major source of railway information in
the Public Archives of Canada. This Record Group compri­
ses the whole of the archives of the Canadian National Ra­
il1ays and includes the internal records of the many con­
stituent companies which formed the publically-owned sys­
tem.
CANAD1AN
130
R A I L
In 1962,the CN employed Mr. John Andreassen as ar­
chivist to survey the Companys archives and recommend
what
might be done with these records • >Then the survey of
our non-current corporate records was begun, wrote Mr.
Andreassen, hardly two volumes in a series were in order.
He recommsnded that the material be sorted, indexed and
sent to the Public Archives of Canada to be stored and
made
accessible to interested members of the public.
Throughout the last decade, literally carloads of
these records have been transferred to ottawa by Mr. An­
dreassen,-469 volumes of papers relating to the Inter­
colonial Railway and 9,000 volumes of Canadian National
R~11ways records have been boxed and shelved at the Pub­
lic Archivesl By some time in 1970,Mr. Andreassen, now
working on the project on a part-time basis,1111 have pre­
pared indexes to most of this material and in addition, the
staff at the Public Archives is working intensely on a
preliminary inventory of these records. No serious student
of Canadian ~ailway history can overlook this significant
collection of corporate records, which has only recently
been placed in a location vhere it will be available to
the public.
It should be noted that research workers must apply
to the Canadian National Railways for permission to con­
sult any records of the Company which are less than thir­
ty years old.
Record Group 43
This is a collection of records from the Department
of Railways and Canals, -nm/ the Department of Transport,
which was originally created in 1879 to administer the
rallvay affairs of the government of Canada. Thus, these
records serve as an extension of the material contained
in Record Groups 1 and 11.
At present (January,1970),most of this extensive
collection of 659 shelf-feet of records is stored at the
Record Centre of the Government of Canada and has not
yet been transferred by the Department-of Transport to
the Public Archives. When this transfer occurs,-and it
is expected shortly, valuable records dating from 1847 to
1936 will be available to the public and the somewhat­
neglected late-Victorian period of Canadian railway de­
velopment will be able to be studiedln greater detail
than has been possible,hitherto.
Record Group 46
The records of the Board of Transport Commissioners,
today the Canadian Transport Commission, include important
CANADIAN
131 R A I L
records involving that increasingly-common phenomenon in
modern-day railway history,-abandonment. Also included
in these papers are extensive records of hearings before
the Board and an index to these is expected shortly from
the C.T.C. by the Public Archives.
Manuscript Group 29
This is an important manuscript group, containing
the papers of many Canadian post-Confederation figures,
connected with Canadian railways. Series A includes the
folloling notable persons:
3. Sir R.B.Angus 1875-1902 microfilmj 3 reels j
8. Sir Sandford Fleming 40 feetj
10. Sir Joseph Hickson 2 inches j
12. Mr. Samuel Keefer 2 inches j
19. Mr. Marcus Smith (ICR 1 -CPR 3}l
20. Sir George Stephen 2 inchesj
22. Sir Henry Tyler 2 inchesj
23. Mr. Edmund Wragge 1 inch.
Other Manuscript Grou~s
Briefly,it should be noted that several other man­
uscript groups contain railway information. These are:
MG 9 Papers relating to provincial and interpro­
vincial railways in New Brunswickj
MG 24 Miscellaneous lists,specifications,etc., of
various raill,ay companies.
MG 30 20th.century manuscripts which include the
memoirs of H.W.D.Armstrong,a civil engineer,
who was involved in the construction of four
major railways and the papers of C.M.Hays,of
the Grand Trunk Railway,Ilhich relate to the
Grand Trunk PacifiC Railway.
In addition to all the records and manuscripts de­
scribed, the Public Archives of Canada also houses an ex­
tensive collection of maps, pamphlets and photographs,many
of 1hich pertain to Canadian railways,as weB. as copies
of newspapers, bound and on microfilm. These sources also
are invaluable to the railway historian.
There is a great need for continuing research in
the field of Canadian railway history and development.The
stories of many small lines remain to be tOldj the pub­
lished histories of other railways need to be revised and
expanded. The raw materials from which these ne.,. histor­
ies can be fashioned lie waiting to be used in the public
Archives of Canada,at ottawa.
66CANADIAN
RAIL??
POLICY
The Board of Directors of the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association has
directed that the following statement
be published in CANADIAN RAIL:
The
opinions expressed in articles and reports in the Associa-
tions publication CANADIAN RAIL are those of the author.s and are
not, unless specifically stated, those of the Canadian Railroad His­
torical Association. The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
and the EXlitor,CANADIANRAIL,cannot accept any responsibility for
the return of unsolicited manuscripts or photographs submitted
for publication in CANADIAN RAIL, but the EXlitor will make every
effort to return material submitted for publication at the request
of the person making the submission.
To dispel any misunderstanding regard­
ing information included in articles
published in CANADIAN RAIL, the EXlitor would
like to communicate the follow­
ing information to contributors:
1. No changes will be made in statements of fact made by a
contributor;accuracy is the responsibility of the author;
2. The EXlitor reserves the right to make certain changes in
grammar and syntax and in the choice of adjectives and
adverbs, for reasons of space accommodation;
3. Comments regarding information contained in articles in
CANADIAN RAIL should be addressed to the author,in care
of the Editor; the Editor will be glad to forward these
comments to the author;
4. Readers are encouraged to write to the Editor at any time
with suggestions for improving the written material pub­
lished in the magazine; suggestions regarding lay-out,pr­
inting and other production aspects should be directed to
the Director,Production. Comments regarding the distribu­
tion of CANADIAN RAIL should be directed to the Director,
Distribution.
The Editor regrets that in the February,1970,issue of CANADIAN
RAIL,in some of the photo captions,he was unable to differen­
tiate between F-M Trainmasters
ll
and model H-16 -44s. He has
since been suitably educated and assures Mr. R.A.Loat,the au­
thor of the article IICoal to Japan
ll
that this error will not
be repeated. .
DOORS
11111I1 1I1II111111111
II I
$ 1,000
$ 2,000
$ 3,000
$ 4,000
$ 5,000
To close the six doors on the new Exhibit Building Noo 2 , at the
Canadian Railway Museum. Our quotation is in, and our target has
been lowered to $ 4,600.000 •• , One final tug should do ito
This is the way Building no,
2 looked in the autumn of
1969. The front has been
partially closed in and the
money donated to the DOORS
Fund will permit the in­
stallation of vertical roll­
type doors to protect the
exhibits from the elements.
Photo by Museum Commission,

OBSERVATIONS
VVITH F.A.KEMP
……..
COMPULOORY RErmEMENT FOR FREIGHT CARS,
August 1,1970 is the deadline for removal
of all freight cars,50 years or more old,
from interchange service in North America.
The original deadline, under the order is­
sued by the Mechanical Division of the As­
sociation of American Rai1roads,was Jan­
uary 1,1970,but it was extended due to a
few
protests from private car owners,mos­
t1y operators of tank and refrigerator
cars, that the notice given was too short
to allow orderly compliance. Something
like 32,000 cars will be affected. Most
Canadian cars of this vintage have al­
ready been retired, following similar or­
ders banning the use of cars with arch­
bar trucks, without AB brakes and with­
out all-steel whee1s,from interchange
service.
SOME TRANSrr NOTES:
The bill setting up the Montreal Urban Community
came
into force January 1,1970. This add it iona1
level of municipal government is to assume re­
sponsibility for common public transport ser­
vices on the Island of Montreal, in addition to
other services. The MUC is expected to assume
control of the Montreal Transportation Commission
and
the whole would become known as -the Montreal
Urban Community Transit Commission (MUCTC) pro­
bably translated as Commission de Transport du
Communaute
Urbain de Montreal (CTCUM). Either of
these sets of initials, if spoken, sound like an
Eskimo word for a lllOuthfu1 of dr ied seal meat I The
MTC already serves the eastern end of the Island,
while t~~ western portion is served by Metropol­
itan Provincial, Inc., Autobus Mi11e-Iles, Inc., and
Brisebois Bus Lines •
• • •
Jim Shaughnessy sends us this excellent picture of Boston & Maine Rail­
road Pacific no. 3713,formerly of Steamtown U.S.A. and now resident at
the Museum of SCience,Boston,Mass. The newly-painted locomotive will be
placed under cover at an early date.
CANADIAN
136
R A I L
NEW CARS FOR TORONTOS SUBWAY:
On January 20,1970,the Toronto Transit Commission awarded a con­
tract to Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited for construction of 76 new
subway
cars. The cars will be similar to the Hawker-built brushed­
aluminum cars, now in use,but will have cheaper,although unproved,
motors. The Company was the low bidder on the contract at $ 11,781,
787 ,or approximately $ 155,000 each. The cars built in 1964 cost
$ 93,000 each. Hawker Siddeley will build the cars in its Thunder
Bay,ont. (late Fort William) plant. One of the TTC commissioners,
James Fisher,asked the Commission to place the order with the sec­
ond lowest bidder,MLW-Worthington,L1mited,on the grounds that the
MLW-W cars would have a better appearance,a better welded construc­
tion and experience-proven motors, although costing $ 900 more per
unit,but his plea was rejected. MLW-W built the first 26 light­
weight cars (nos. 5300-5325) for the TTC. The new cars will be re­
quired when the YONGE (street) line extension opens in 1972, but
earlier delivery will help to alleviate the present tight equip­
ment situation.
TIGHT FIT AT TORONTO:
Torontos subway recently acquired a crane car which,when delivered
proved to be too high, both for the subway tunnels and the shop
doors. This peculiar situation had to be corrected by modifying the
cars springs. After this alteration,it will be used for replacing
worn rails and special work,as well as other jobs requiring heavy
lifts.
AIR POLLt1IION AND TROLLEY BUSES:
Many
of the Canadian transit systems which convert.ed from rails to
rubberll,during the late 1940S and early 50s,adopted the elec­
tric trolley ~oach for some or all of their lines. As these ve­
hicles are now no longer being built and the existing ones are due
for replacement, the usual course has been to convert these elec­
tric buses to diesel-powered units. This conversion has already
occurred in Ottawa and Montreal and,more recently,in Halifax and
Thunder Bay (merged Fort William and Port Arthur,Ont.),despite the
environmental pollution factors of fumes and noise tlhich are not
emitted by the electric vehicles. The Toronto Transit Commission,
facing the same problems on its seven trolley-coach routes, sent
unit no. 9020 to Western Flyer Coach Limited of Winnipeg,where it
received a new body of modern design. The IINEW 9020 has since run
more than 31,000 miles, evoking favourable comment from passengers
and employees. TTC has awarded a contract to western Flyer Coach
of $ 5,225,000,for the rebuilding of 151 vehicles over a period of
two years. The electrical equipment and motors, which are still in
good condition after 18 to 23 years of service,will be overhauled
in Hillcrest Shops of the TTC. Each rejuvenated unit will cost
about $ 4,000 less than a new diesel-p011ered bus.
CANADIAN
137
R A I L
OLD KJNG COAL, THE MERRY OLD SOUL,REIGNS AGAllf:
CP RAIL unit coal trains,105-ton gondola cars,ROBOT control, new
diesel units, the Sparwood Branch,the Roberts Bank Terminal and the
Alberta Resources Railway have all made the news in the last year,
but Canadian National stole a march recently on all the new, high­
ly-publicized facilities,by operating its own unit coal train from
Luscar,Alberta to Neptune Terminals in North Vancouver,B.C. In the
light of this event,it is hard to believe that the last coal train
operated over this line back in 1956. The line to Luscar,official­
ly the Mountain Park Subdivision,extends 68 miles south from a con­
nection vlith CNs main line at Bickerdike,Alta. to Luscar,Mountain
Park and Foothills,Alta. The coal comes from an open-pit mine op­
erated by Card inal River Coals Limited at Luscar. There ,ere once
a dozen mines in the vicinity but all of them closed as markets
diminished. The Luscar operation was the last to close and the fir­
st to re-open. One 85-car train will operate every five days. Many
sidings have-been built and existing ones extended on CNs compar­
atively easy route through Yellowhead Pass in the Canadian Rockies
and the new tunnel-bridge route, completed last year,provides easy
access to North Vancouver,where Neptune Terminals is located. The
Luscar trains will soon be joined by others running from Grand
Cache
on the Alberta Resources Railway,where McIntyre-Porcupine
Mines will begin shipments of black diamonds late this spring.
TO THE GREAT OCEAN:
Canadian National is also involved,along with CP RAIL,BC HYDRO and
Great Northern (U.S.A.) in construction of the access route to the
Roberts Bank superport terminal,destination of CP RAILs unit coal
trains. When all of the dust generated during the construction has
settled,CP RAIL coal trains will follow the following route:Crows­
nest line to CQlvalli; Windermere Subdivision to Golden; main line
to Mission; Huntingdon Branch to Matsqui; CN main line to Hydro Jun­
ction; then over a new 2-mile branch being built by CN to Living­
stone on the BC HYDRO Railway; then over the BC HYDRO main line to
Cloverdale and a new branch to Pratt Junction on the Great North­
ern;after running about a mile on Great Northern track to Cole­
brook, the trains will run over a new line west to Roberts Bank.Th­
is new line has also been built by BC HYDRO. The first CP RAIL tr­
ain is expected in late March or early April and will undoubtedly
experience some operational problems,as it appears that the CN pa­
rt of the line will not be completed in time, due to legal and oth­
er difficulties. It 1l1,in this event,either have to transfer to
BC HYDROs line at Abbotsford, farther dmTn the Huntingdon Branch,
or continue on the main line to Coquitlam and down the Westminster
Branch to interchange to the Great Northern at Sapperton, thence
acros·s the busy br idge at New Westminster to Colebrook and Roberts
Bank. Both of these alternatives will involve reverse movements,as
well as probable break-up of the unit trains, which the planned rou­
te,when completed, is particularly designed to avoid.

CANADIAN
139
R A I L
Reference to the BC HYrnO map in the current Offic ial Guide of
the Railways … Till help to clarify this route. The four-railway li-
ne is actually the most straightfonvard one that could be built,
using as it does the minimum amount of new trackage,while avoid-
ing obvious bottlenecks such as the busy Fraser River bridge at
New Westminster,which is a pile-and-truss draw span, used since
time immemorial by CN,GN and BC HYrnO.
ICE, SPRING,FLOODS AND WASHOUIS:
The main line of CP RAIL bet~een McAdam and Saint John,New Bruns­
wick was cut late in February,following heavy rains in southTest­
ern Ne1 Brunswick,which caused rivers to rise rapidly,breaking up
the ice,Hashing out railroad roadbeEls and damaging bridges. One of
two bridges near Bailey,N.B. was lifted from its piers,while the
other … Tas displaced slightly. The Atlantic Limited laS turned
around at McAdam until the line … Tas repaired and passengers were
carried to and from Saint John by bus. CP RAIL fre ight trains at
first operated over CN lines from Quebec eastward to Saint John ,
via Moncton and some via Fredericton,but in the latter days, they
ran all the way from Montreal via the CN. CP RAILs line was re­
opened early in March,but slow orders in many places will probably
remain in effect until late spring. In the same area,CN did not
fare much better,but washouts were principally confined to branch
lines, since CNs main line follows the east coast of the Province.
SAINT JOHN TRAINSHED COMES DOWN,DESPITE THE RAIN:
Canadian railway stations with trainsheds covering all or most of
their tracks are comparatively rare,so the demolition of the one
at Saint John,N.B. Union Station is noteworthy. Due to the neces­
sity to provide approaches to the new Harbour Bridge,as 1lell as
reconstruction of the Mill Street Viaduct,the eight tracks of Union
Station have been reduced to four and the shed completely torn down.
The nearest city bus stop has been relocated two blocks awayl Track
1 handles the two daily CN RAILINERS; Track 2 is used for car stor­
age; Track 3 receives CP RAILs Atlantic Limited and Track 4 is
the run-around n for fre ight trains and diesel un its. Union Station
is actually owned by Canadian National and ~las built in 1925. It
bears some architectural resemblance to Halifax and Hamilton(James
street) stations,which Tere built in the same period. Although the
layout of the three terminals is markedly different,the materials
used and the similarity of appearance suggest a common architect •
. . ..
CP RAILs new bi-levels ar8 off and running during the week of March 23.
These two specimens were caught at CP RAILs Glen Yard on March 19,1970,
by M.P.Murphy. More on the bi-levels in a future issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
Canadian Car & Foundry Companys lot 511 of September,1921 was a group
of 48-foot centre-entrance-exit trailer cars for the Toronto Transpor­
tation Commission,Toronto,Ont;
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S ARCHIVES
CANADIAN RAIL
published by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOFlCAl. ASSOCIATION
p,O.Box. 22, St.dt.ion °a
Mont.relll, Qu.I) ,
Assooiat.e Membership i nol uding 11 issues of
Canadian Rail E3.00 annually.
EDITOR S. VVort.hen FRODUCTION F.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A Kemp
DISTRIEUTION J.A.Eeat.t.y & F.F.AnguS
VISIT THE
Canadiau Railway Museum
let
VISITEZ LE

_. OUMVuseEe ~eTrrOVjnire Canadien
OFEN MAY SEFT. ,. ~ MAl -SEFT,
DIRECTOR OF ERANCHES
C. ,01. K. H~ard I 74 Sou thern Dr1 ve. Ottillwa 1, Ca:nD.do.
DIRECTOR OF MEMEERSHIF SERVICES
~lro J .A.Beatty. 4982 Queen Nary Road, Montreal 248, Quebec, Canada,
ASSOC IA TION ERANCHES
OTTAWA
~lr.M. Iveson • secty •• P.O.Box 352, Term1nal All ottawa Onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN Mr. Donald W.Scafe 12407 Lansdowne Dr1ve, Apt. 101. Edmonton AltElo
ASSOCIATION REFRESENTATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY
SASKATCHEWAN
P
ACIFIC COAST
PAR EAST
BRITISH ISLES
MANIIOllA
ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. 3,67 Somerset St. W., Ottawa, OnteriO.
J.S.Nlcholoson, 2)06 Arnold St., SAskatoon. Saskatchewan.
Peter Cox, 609 Cotton …. ·ood Ave., Coqultlam. British Columbia.
W.D.NcKeotlTl.. 6-7. 4-chome. Yamate-cho.Su1tn Clty. Osaka. Japan.
J. H. Sanders I 67 Willow Way I Ampth1l1. Beds., England.
h.G.Younger. 267 Vernon Road. rJ1nn1peg, ~;~:mltobC.
Io1r. Donald W.Sc£lfe,12407 Lansdo …. T1e Dr1ve. Apt. lOl.Edmontor. Alta.
Copyright 1970 Pr1nted in Canada on Canad1en paper.
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