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Canadian Rail 216 1969

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Canadian Rail 216 1969

IVO. 2:1.&
DECElllI:BEH. :1.9&9
I
I
ftJ .Br~ ,m
~~~~~H
du
Sainte
M.Peter Murphy
SO VERY LONG AGO, THE SUBURBAN
line of the Quebec Railway,Light
and Power Company, (sometimes af­
fectionately called the QuirlP)
was alive with tuscan red trol­
ley cars, shuttling back and for­
th between the ancient capital
of Quebec and the riverside lo­
calities of Montmorency,Ste-Anne­
de Beaupre and St-Joachim. Along
this 25-mile line are such we 11-
known landmarks as Montmorency
Falls and the Basilica at Ste­
Anne-de -Beaupre.
Ila
TO THE EIECTRIC RAILWAY EIlTHUSIAST, THE IARGEST OF THESE RED EIEC­
tric cars seemed to be those of the 450 series and,indeed,this was
the case. The six cars in this series were the second largest in­
terurban cars ever to operate in Canada,being exceeded in size
only by numbers 12 and 14 of the London and Port Stanley Railway,
in the neighbouring Province of Ontario (see CANADIAN RAIL, April,
1968). In the latter years of the Quirlps eXistence,these big
motor cars were the backbone of the operation, -an unusual oper-
. ation by any standards and peculiar in Canada to the Quirlp.
C :iC :::xc ::a
LIKE EATONS SANTA CLAUSE PARADE, the Christmas Tree in CP RAILs Windsor
Station,Montr~al is a traditional part of the Yuletide scene. This beau­
tiful creation graced the concouse during the Christmas 5eason,1947.
Photograph C.R.H.A-E.A.Toohey Call •
.. QUEBEC RAILJJAY LIGHT & POWER Car no. 452 ~n the St-Paul Station yards at
Qu~bec on July 7,1948. Photo courtesy R.F.Corley.
CANADIAN
312
R A I L
Originally ordered in August,1929,the big,red ,
cars were delivered from the Ottawa Car Company
in June, 1930. Their general dimensions were as
follows:
Length over buffers
Length over body cor­
ner_posts
Width over sheathing
Height-rail to roof-
walk
-leight -fully equipped
Seating capacity
65 feet
53 feet 0 7/16 inches
10 feet
12 feet 7 7/8 inches
87,500 pounds
111 persons
A DETAIIED DESCRIPlION OF THESE NEW CARS IS FOUND IN THE JUNE, 1930
issue of the publication canadian Railway and Marine World,which
reported all such information scrupulously. The new cars had str­
aight sides,round ends,arched roofs,single sashes to raise as well
as single and master controls. The interiors were divided into a
main room
and a smoking compartment. The underframes were of
steel construction with end, centre and cross-sills of channel sec­
tion. The body side-framing was of girder construction, with posts
of steel pressings,side sheathing of 5/32-inch steel plate and
letter-board of 1/8-inch steel. They were certainly built to last
and that is exactly what they did. They lasted and lasted!
c :xc :cc ::x
AFTER A RUN FROM QUEBEC CITY, Q.R.L.& p. motor no. 455 stands beside the
Cyclorama at Sta-Anne-de-Beaupre,Que.,on July 8,1948. No. 455 will be
turned on the nearby turntable before returning to Quebec.
Photo courtesy of Mr. R.F.Corley.
MOTOR CAR NO. 453 POSES FOR A PICTURE on the Q.R.L.& p.s turntable at
the St-Paul Station yards at Quebec on the afternoon of February 29,1948.
The turntable was classified as a high-speed type and its operation had
to be seen to be believed. Photograph from C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey ColI.
c >c ::xc ::x
THESE LARGE CARS HAD INIERURBAN-TYPE VESTIBU­
les, with a door in the centre of the rear one,
to permit passage through the train. The ves­
tibule posts were steel with wood fillers. The
bulkheads were also of steel and wood -panel
construction. The roofs were of the wood and
canvas type. The interior of the cars sparkled
with panelling and moulding of first quality
birch,smoothly finished and highly polished.
Headlining and waist-panelling was in 5/16-in­
ch AGASarE,with the doors in the bulkheads and
partitions of cherrY,with glass upper-panels .
All this in the best tradition of twentieth­
century interurban car building. Floors vlere
3/4-inch tongue-and-groove yellow pine, laid
double,with building paper between the layers.
ALL ELECTRICAL vlIRE WAS INSTALLED IN GALVANIZED STEEL CONDUIT. THE
cars were heated by 35 CALROD unit heaters,operating 5 in series,
arranged with 26 in the main room and 5 in the smoking compart­
ment. The motorman was warmed by 4 heaters in the front vestibule.
The seats were of the stationary type (Since the cars operated on­
ly in one direction) and were covered with PANAsarE 707 material,
the seat cushions being an ample 3 feet 10 inches long, ac~ommoda­
ting 3 passengers each. The bulkhead seats were narrower and sea­
ted only 2 passengers each, to allow for the opening of the bulk­
head doors. The ten NICHOLS-LINIERN ventilators, with 8 x 12-inch
openings,were mounted on the roof of each car. All sash was of
brass, the sash in the body being single and designed to raise,wh­
ile that in the vestibule was single and installed permanently,ex-
I
w
<
u
CANADIAN
315
R A I L
cept in the motormans compartment in the front,where adequate
ventilation was necessary and thereby possible. The lighting in
the interior was provided by dome-light fixtures. A GOLDEN GLOW
headlight Vias installed on the hood of the front vestibule and a
KEYSTONE incandescent headlight,without resistances,was fixed to
the front centre dasher-sheet.
ALL OF THE BODY WINDOWS WERE EQUIPPED WITH CUR­
tains of PANIASarE 2577. The lavatory was aDay­
ton Re7. no. 22 dry hopper,a very practical ty­
pe of toilet for an electric interurban car for
service in heavily-populated suburban areas. On
the front vestibule platform was mounted a drop­
handle hand-brake. The car body and sides and
letter-boards were insulated with plastic cork,
to keep out the bitter cold which was frequent­
ly encountered in winter-time operation, along
the north shore of the st. Lawrence River. The
trolley boards were made of ash, 1 1/8 by 6
inches,supported on l~-inch ribs,bedded on rub­
ber strips mounted on the roof.
C 2C :::xc ::::a
EASTBOUND FROM ST-PAUL STATION IN QUEBECS Lower Town,Q.R.L.&P. Motor No.
453 crosses the ewing-bridge over the St-Charlas River on November 12th.
1950. This bridge is now used by Cenadian National for their RDC RAIL­
INER service to La Malbaie,Qu8. Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
t
AT THE EASTERN TERMINUS OF THE q.R.L. & P.s electric operatlon,Motor No.
455 and trailer,-the afternoon train to quebec, pause briefly at the sta­
tion at St-Joachlm,que.,on November 11,1950. Photo CRHA E.A.Toohey ColI.
:: :::Xc :::I: :::x
THE PILar OR COWCATCHER WAS OF PIPE CONSTRUCTION AND 1lAS MOUN­
ted under the front vestibule,in such a way as to be attached to
the frame, rather than the floor of the car. The cars were equipped
with draft gear with standard M.C.B. couplers and sand was carried
in two boxes, one on either side of the car,with air-operated san­
ders,NICHOLS-LI~ERN type B sand-trap and brass valve. In addition
to all these accessories, other equipment included an air-signal
system, KEYSTONE type S destination signs,a MENIER window-cleaner,
on the motormans window,treads on the vestibule steps, luggage
racks,O.B.trolley-retriever (very important) and a NATIONAL LOCK­
WASHER type of curtain fixtures.
THE TRUCK WHEELS WERE 33 INCHES IN DIAMETER AND
the journal bearings were of the plain type.The
motor equipment consisted of 4 WESTINGHOUSE 100
horsepower motors per car,with controls of the
HL type. Air brakes were by WESTINGHOUSE, sched­
ule A.M.M. and the car trucks were BRILL M.C,B.
3X type.
vlHEN THE CARS CAME our OF THE BUILDERS SHOPS, THEY WERE PAINIED A
deep, crimson red with a black underbody and roof and gold-ye llow
lettering. A feature peculiar to this electric railway was the pro­
viSion of a collapsable step-ladder,mounted on the roof of the
car. This device could be used to permit emergency overhead wire
CANADIAN
317
R A I L
repair, if required. The aforementioned pipe pilots were mounted
permanently and could support overmounted steel snow-plows for win­
ter-time operation through the snowdrifts along the exposed parts
of the line. The six cars were numbered 450 to 455,were all motor
cars and ~ere all built by ottawa Car, be ing outs hopped in 1930. In
1959,all of them were scrapped,except number 454,which was saved
from the wreckers hammer and is presently preserved by the New
England Electric Railway Historical Society at the Seashore Trolley
Museum,Kennebunkport,Maine,U.S.A. This fortunate survivor has been
completely restored externally and it is understood that the in­
terior rest0ration is progressing rapidly. The car is mechanically
fit and is operated,at times.
THE ONLY OIHER ELECTRIC CARS OF THE QUIRLP
that have been preserved are number 105, a vin­
tage-1889 Jackson & Sharp trailer and motor car
number 401,built in 1902. These cars are pres­
ently preserved at the Canadian Railway Museum,
Delson/St-Constant,Que. Thus,only three cars
remain of the many which used to keep the rails
t :::Ie ::::xc ::a
THE STATION AT MONTMORENCY FALLS was one of the most picturesque struc­
tures on the Q.R.L. & p. After turning on the wye behind the station , Motor
no. 453 becomes the afternoon train to QUBbec,on February 29,1948.
Photo from C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
Sketch by Robert Half yard.
shiny between Quebec,Montmorency Falls and St­
Joachim,-twenty five miles of pleasant riding
for many thousands of passengers, in the happy
days of electric interurban railway operation.
C :::Ie :at 3
t THE ONLY ONE OF THE 450 SERIES OF THE Q.R.L.& P. which has been pre­
~ served is no. 454,pictured here at the Seashore Trolley Museum, Kenne­
bunkport,Maine. The restoration of thie car in some instances surpasses
the condition of the cer when it was new. Note the aluminum window fra­
meB,-a really excellent jobl Photo courtesy F.F.Angus.
ILICTBIC B!ILW!T
R.D.Tennant,jr.
T he memorable era of rail-borne transit
on the streets of our Nations Capital
ended just a decade ago. The electric
street railway service was born to
the incredulous acclaim of thousands
on a June day in 1891; it died, to the
nostalgic acclaim of other thousands
on an April day in 1959. To give ad­
equate recognition to the founding
growth and trials of ottawas street
railways would require an entire book.
Short of this, howeve r ,ment ion can be
made of the principal company involved
and that brings us to the purpose of
this article: to chronicle some of the
highlights of the ottawa Electric Rail­
way Company.
In 1891, in the finest flowering of the Edwardian Era,
there were two companies providing street railway service to ot­
tawans. The older firm was the ottawa City passenger Railway Com­
pany of 1866. It had placed its faith in the durability of the
horse-drawn streetcar. The other company was the ottawa Electric
Street Railway Company,-a .creation of Messrs. Ahern and Soper,
to exploit the application of electricity to the propulsion of
streetcars. It was to be expected that, since Messrs. Aherl abd
Soper were deeply involved in the affairs of both companies, the
two organizations would amalgamate in the course of time. Such
course of time was not long in coming. Three Canadian cities had
already adopted electric traction and since June 29,1891,the OEBR
had been operating electrically-propelled streetcars during the
summer months. But it was the winter of 1891-92 that proved to be
the turning point in the history of both street railways. Winter­
time operation of electric streetcars (supported by electric sw­
eepers) proved to be an unqualified success. ottawans showed a
preference for the electric cars by riding them in numbers three-

CANADIAN 321 R A I L
to-one over horse-cars. Clearly,horse-drawn streetcars could not
compete with electric ones.
The street railway snow-clearance system, used for many
years, began in that winter of 1892. Sweepers which were equipped
with revolving rattan brushes, brushed the snow from the rails. It
was then plowed back to form snowbanks by wing-plows,-the latter
also carried by the trams. Later, a team of men would shovel the
snow into horse-drawn,box-equipped sleighs. Drivers and shovellers
were paid but 14 cents an hour then. During the ten-hour work-day,
some 25 loads could be made by each of the 80 snow-box sleighs .The
loads were dumped at various places throughout the City, but espec­
ially along the Rideau River and Canal.
In 1919, the ottawa Electric Railway purchased a fleet of
Model T Ford trucks which were fitted with bright red snow-boxes.
They gradually replaced the horse-drawn sleighs in the central
area of the City and they remained a familiar sight until the late
1940s,at whj,ch time the City took over the task of snow removal.
The two street railway companie s merged on March 26,1894
under the name ottawa City passenger Railway Company and by a
subsequent Act of parliament, the new Company adopted the more fam­
iliar name Ottawa Electric Railway Company. Both CCPR and OESR
had co-signed an agreement with the City of ottawa,on June 28,1893
whereby the Companies were responsible for the construction, main­
tenance and operation within the City limits of an electric street
railway for a period of thirty years,which period was to be com­
puted from August 13,1893. This agreement,to which ottawa Electric
was now committed, was renewable at five-year intervals, with the
City retaining the option to buy the Companys assets at the end
of each such period.
The location of the car routes within the City limits was
the subject of several agreements with the City from 1894, onward .
The ex-OCPR
car lines were electrified and some of the former OESR
car lines were extended. In succeed ing years, rails pushed out in
every direction,-to Hintonburg,the Experimental Farm, Britannia,
ottawa South and Lindenlea, and everywhere they went, the City
followed. On November 9,1894,the ottawa Electric contracted with
the Federal governments Post Office Department,for the carriage of
mails from the Post Office at Sappers Bridge to the Citys three
railway stations: Brockville & Ottawas Broad Street Station; St.
Lawrence & Ottawas Sussex Street Station and Canada Atlantics El­
gin Street Station,near Pretoria Bridge.
To provide this unique service,the Company went to the
expense of converting three horse-drawn cars into single-truck el-
c :at :ac :::a
OTTAWA ELECTRIC RAILWAYs open-side,singls-truck streetcsrs,such as No.
10,seen here on Wellington Street at Metcalf,operated in sea~onable wea­
ther from ths 1890s to the early 1900s. Photo courtesy Ottawa Trans.Com.
CANADIAN
322
R A I L
ectric cars,numbers 1,2 & 3. These cars remained in service until
1906,when three specially designed mail cars from the ottawa car
and Manl,tfacturing Company replaced them. These cars,which carried
numbers 423 to 425 remained in service until September 11,1911, on
which date Canadas only street railway mail service came to an
end. Ironically,the OER contract was closed on the very day that
the Company had planned to place in service t~lO add itional mail
cars. ottawa Electric had lost out to a cartage firml
With keen interest ottawans had watched the construction
and operation of their electric street railway. Naturally, they
took every opportunity to express their pride in the system. The
ottawa Journal of June 22,1895,ivas enthusiastic:
If your friends, who I,ill come to the growing capital
c :::xc ::xc ::a
~ A NAVVV OF SNOWSHOVELLERS snd a fleet of model T Ford trucks were cau­
ght in this typical snow–removal scene on Preston Street,north of Somer­
sst Street,circs 1920. Photo courtesy Ottswa Transportation Commission.
Central
Experimental
Farm
CIT Y OF H U L L
Lansdolme
Park
Rockcliffe
Park
OTTAWA ELECTRIC RAILVAY
Streetcar Routes
in the
Ci ty of Otta>la

CANADIAN 324 R A I L
~ AT THE CHAMPAGNE CAR BARN of the Ottawa Electric Railway,Mr. Paul Leveil­
le could be found hammering rattan strips into the segments of the broom
for the electric snow-sweeper. Photo courtesy Ottawa Transportation Comm.
e :Ie :xc: ::x
IN THE DAYS WHEN OTTAWANS COULD GO for a Sunday ride through Rockcliffe
Park,single-truck car number 226 came trundling around the curves above
the Ottawa River,on the way back to the City. This excellent pen-and-ink
drawing is the work of Mr. Pierre Langevin of Ottawa.
/
rC-~
!,… J —–
~I !
I
~ ,-.-,–
C· -~
yo
…:7
, .,
, I
~ .\-.
, ~ ~ ,I
4 If
.• ,1, _ …. ,1,. .
this summer,want to know how many cars are in service
here, tell them there are 68 cars and that nowhere are
cars kept in better repair and cleaned and dusted for
the benefit of the public. 1/
The celebrations in 1897 for Queen Victorias 60th. Jub­
ilee turned the Nation.s Capital into a hive of activity for vis­
itors and citizens alike. Thousands of sightseers admired thou­
sands of electric lights which. had been installed on the facades
of the Parliament Buildings by Messrs. Ahern and Soper, thereby
adding to the attractions in the City that increased streetcar
patronage.
For many ottawa families who did not own a horse-and-
carriage at that time,the opportunity of Sunday picnics and out­
ings came in the year 1900. To mark the new Sunday streetcar se r­
vice, the Company introduced a special fare of seven tickets for
25 cents. Thousands of ottawans were most appreciative of this new
opportunity,for they were no longer confined to their homes of a
Sunday,norwere they limited to the conventional short walk, eve~
though they could not afford a cab. Now,for only a few cents, they
could board a modern, electrically-propelled and heated streetcar
and travel quickly and comfortably to any of a number of centres of
interest in or around the capital.
One such centre was the Britannia Auditorium,which, dur­
ing the summer months,provided many good shows, often headlined by

CANADIAN 327 R A I L
vlell-known entertainers from the vaudevtlle circuii;, The Auditorium
was the focal point in Britannia park, a 58}-acre amusement park ,
located about four miles lest of Ottawa (from the 1939 City limit),
It was connected with the Holland Avenue line of the OER by a
3.
85-mtle double-track line on private right-of-way, The Parl< en­
joyed early popularity and thousands thronged there on week-·ends
and holidays during good weather, It was a familiar sight to see a
do
zen or so cars augmenting the regular streetcar service,
C ::a: :::xc ::::x
~ ROYAL MAIL CAR NO. 1 OF THE Ottawa Electric Railway poses on Sappers
Bridge,OttaljJa,where tha National Illar Memorial now stands. In the back­
ground can be seen the Centre and East Blocks of the Parliament Build­
ings.To the left is the.Central Post Office,in front of which can be
seen Mr. Thomas Ahern,President of the O.E.R. Note the chimney on the
car roof,just left of the rear vestibule. Mr. Ahern,the inventor of
the electric car heater in 1912,was gradually replacing the stoves,but
at the time of the photograph.themail cars had not been converted. The
royal crown is flenked by V and R,indicating that Queen Victoria
was still on the throne. Photo courtesy Ottawe Transportation Comm.
ON JANUARY 12,1905,SNOW SHOVELLERS FILL 1 of the 78 wooden boxes,built
by the O.E.R. to carry about 7 yards of snow. Contractors supplied hor­
ses,sleds and teamsters for 25 cents per load. Ottawa Transportation Comm.
t
ORIGINALLY CONSTRUCTED AT A LOCATION at Victoria Park on Holland Avenue,
just south of what is now The Queensway,Britannia Park Auditorium looked
like this in 1926. It was dismantled and moved from the Victoria Park
eite in early 1905.It was afterwards known as Lakesida Gardens. Opening
as a vaudeville theatre,it was leter converted to a cinama and finally
became a danca hall. Photographed from the pier,looking southeast, this
landmark was destroyed by fire on July 4,1955. Ottawa Transportation Comm.
C :)c :Ie ::::a
ROCKLIFfE
WEDNESDAY
OC1.281942
3940 I Re·lS$U8d I til
6 a.m. ,~
7 a.m. 10
8 a.m. 80
9 40
CANADIAN 329 R A I L
Equipment and operating practices changed as the years
passed. Single-truck cars (and there were 115) gradually gave way
to double-truck cars,which accommodated about twice as many people.
Switchmen became redundant as turning loops were constructed at
the terminals and electric switches were installed at busy inter­
sections. Such innovations speeded up traffic and facilitated the
introduction of one-man car operation, which began in 1927 with the
acquisition of 20 pay-as-you-enter (PAYE),treadle-step,double-tr­
uck streetcars. The existing PAYL (pay-as-you-leave) type cars were
then gradually modified to the PAYE/treadle-step configuration, if
such rebuilding was economically justified. One hundred percent one
man operation was achieved on August 13,1933.
The OER experimented with some buses in 1924, but these
early models proved to unsatisfactory and so they were withdrawn.
Buses of an improved variety were subsequently placed in service ,
in the 1930s and,as the years passed, the percentage of buses in
the transit fleet grew, until all of the streetcars had been displa­
ced by 1959.
Although the number of passengers transported had risen
to an all-time high of 62 million in 1946, operating expenses had
been rising at a faster rate. Ottawa Electric therefore decided,in
1947,to make application to the City for a fare increase. Some
members of the municipal council who strongly opposed any increase
in fares demanded that the OER be purchased,according to the terms
of the agreement with the City. The Company signified its willing­
ness to sell and so the City council appointed a fact-finding com­
mittee to make an examination and to report subsequently to the Bo­
ard of Control. The Company was to submit its own valuation of its
assets,as well. As it turned out,the two submissions were substan­
tially the same. Final settlement was based on an amount of six
million dollars plus $ 300,000 for four streetcars, numbers 1000 to
1003,which were then under construction for the OER by the ottawa
Car Company. The citizens of ottawa approved the purchase by a
referendum and By-law in the ratio of four to one. At last,on Aug-
ust 14,1948,the ottawa Electric Railway Company terminated its
corporate existance and its properties were transferred to the
newly-formed Ottawa Transportation Commission. This transfer con­
cluded 57 years of private company operation of Ottawas streetcar
system.
In the early years of OER operation, ottawas streetcars
were painted a cream shade and trimmed with gold,-a delight to
the eye. In later years,when the Company prospered, its equipment
was a luscious green. NOw, just a short decade lay ahead of the
Citys. streetcars, until they too would pass into history. As if
to celebrate this· Indian summer of their life, the Commission
painted its remaining streetcars a flaming red and like the autumn
leaves,they had disappeared by the time that the chill winter of
bus operation had begun.
$ 1,000
$ 2,000
$ 3,000
$ 4,000
$ 5,000
$ 6,000
DUUIS
!
II
I1111 1111II11111111
II
,
_., )
f 1 would est.eem it 0 gnat.
favour 1f you l:Duld Elond
me ehl (6) doors for Xm To k.eep out t.he Rlld Daron.
:…. Yours d~.

~
The Officers and Directors of the As­
sociation and the Commissioners of
the Canadian Railway Museum are very
grateful to the undernoted members,
who have so kindly contributed to the
DOORS fund for the second build ing
at the Museum.
I
II
The amount subscribed has now reached $ 500.00. Your assistance in
completing this project is ernestly requested. It is hoped that the
doors may be acquired and installed before snow comes.
BARRY H .Brewster JMP A.F.
CAYA Jacques JONES S .H.
DICK W.D. KENNICKELL H.M.
DOUGLAS J .C . LOWRY H.
DURNFORD J.C. MITCHELL J.F.
DURNFORD E.A. MEGGETT Arthur
EMERY E .C • NICHOLLS R.V.V.
EVANS R.J. NICHOLLS Sarah
FAIRIEY E.L.(jr.) PALMER F.M.
FINDLAY R.G. PERRAULT L.P.
HEATH E.M. SCHOLEFIELD J.A.
HOFFMEISTER J.E. SMITH D.A.
HUGESSEN A.K. STANLEY J.C.
GREENE H.F. VIAU Charles
JOHNSON C .A. WATERS A.E.
WALBRIDGE A.S.
0001 HOURS OCTo 26
1969
A Change of Time
A Time of Change
F .A .Kemp.
T HE FALL AND WINTER TIMETABLES of Canadian rail­
ways,which came into effect or. the last Sunday
in October, 1969, revealed more reductions ir.
passenger train services than any other time­
table in the last five years. Canadas smallest
Province became the first to be deprived of
rail passenger service,as CN discontinued mixed
trair.s between Moncton,N.B. ar.d Charlottetown;
Borden and Summerside,P.E.I. and Summerside and
Tignish,P.E.I. Simultaneously extinguished was
North Americas last passenger car-ferry, as
Trains 235 and 236 were the last such trains to
include a ride on a railway car-ferry.
THE DEMISE OF ANOTHER ISLANDS narrow-gauge passenger trains
101-102, the caribou on Canad ian Nat ional s Newfoundland Area on·
July 2,1969,has already been noted, but the new public folders do
not show the mixed train service which is supposed to operate be­
tween Bishops Falls and Corner Brook, until the access highway to
Howley is completed. Other Newfoundland Area mixed trains remain
unchanged.
THE LONGEST SECTION OF MAm LmE to go freight-only was the
line of the former Halifax and Southwestern between Southwesterr.
Junction and Yarmouth,N.S., 245.7 miles,as CN cut its Halifax-yar­
mouth mixed Trains 244-245,which ran tri-weekly.
INTER-CITY PASSENGER SCHEDULES SUFFERED considerable reductions
as CN consolidated some of its trains between Montreal and Hervey
Que.,Montreal and ottawa and Brockville and Toronto,Ont.Meanwhile,
CP RAIL made drastic cuts on the Toronto-peterboro,Toronto-Windsor
and Calgary-Edmonton services, leaving only one RIX: nayliner in
each direction on each of these lines.
SOME RESCHEDULmG WAS DONE by CP RAIL on the Montreal-Ottawa
and Montreal-Quebec services,apparently to enable the Company to
operate Trains 232,233,234 and 235 with the same equipment, al-
CANADIAN 332 R A I L
though to the detriment of passenger convenience and ottawa-Quebec
connections. Trains 232-235 have assumed the name The Alouette ,
so that all of the passenger trains on this line now have second­
hand names! The Alouette was once a Montreal Boston express ;the
Rideau used to be a Toronto-ottawa and Toronto Montreal flyer,
while The canadian was once a Montreal-Toronto-Detroit-Chicago
train, which carried the same name on the New York Central System.
THE NAME AND EQUIPMENT of CP RAILs Quebec-Montreal Train 153
the Frontenac have changed places with RDC Dayliner Train 151,
which operates a local, except Sunday, schedule. This permits the
RDC-equipped No. 153 to tackle the first three-hour schedule ever
made over this line. There are five stops,including one of 5 min­
utes at Trois-Rivieres,Que. On Sunday, the train runs with con­
ventional equipment. In contrast,CNs Rapido trains make the run
from Montreal to Quebec in 1 minute less, over a route ll~ miles
shorter,with only two stops.
THE CANADIAN HAS HAD ITS RUNNING TIME REDUCED in both dir­
ections,-by one hour vlestbound and 45 minutes eastbound. Itruned­
iate eastbound connection to the Maritime Provinces can now be made
by transfer to Train 42,the Atlantic Limited at Montreal l,vest, if
the transcontinental is on time. Passengers may also make direct
connections for Quebec and New York,under the same circumstance
The earlier operation of Trains 2 and 12 necessitates the depar­
ture of passengers from sault-Ste-Marie,Ont.,on RDC Dayliner 428
at 0515 instead of 0730, in order to make their connection at Sud­
bury. This would seem to be exceeded in inconvenience only by the
opposite Schedule of Train L~27,ihich leaves Sudbury at 0025, ar­
riving at the Soo at 0410!
CN made a rather drastic cut in the service from Toronto to
North Bay,provided by RAILINER Trains 673-674,bY reducing this to
a saturday and Sunday only,from a daily operation. The Northland
(O.N.R.) Trains 87-88 will provide a service,making local stops on
advance request for revenue passengers only.
WEST OF THE GREAT LAKES,the loss of one of the Great Northern
Railroads International services,between Vancouver,B.C. and Sea­
ttle,Washington,has already been noted. But the Northern Pacific
has also eliminated its Winnipeg-Hawley Trains 13 and 14, leaving
G.N.Trains 7 & 8 as the last rail passenger service between Win­
nipeg and the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and st. Paul,Minn.The N.P.
in recent years operated an RDC unit from Fargo,N.D., via Hawley,to
make a connection with its main-line trains, but this connection de­
teriorated to such an extent as to make the southbound service use­
less to all but inveterate train riders!
SUMMARY OF PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE REDUCTIONS.
October 26,1969,or before.
Train
No. Name
CANADIAN
Operated
333
R A I L
Between And Remarks
CN 101 Caribou
102
Tri-weekly St. Johns Port-aux-Basques, July,2,
Nfld. 1969
CN 243 Mixed
244
Tri-weekly Halifax yarmouth,N.S.
CN 235 Mixed
236
Ex. Sunday Moncton Charlottetown,PEI
CN 233 Mixed
234
Ex. Sunday Border Summerside,PEI
CN 237 Mixed
238
Tri-weekly Summers ide Tignish,PEI
CN 70 psgr. Ex. Saturday Montreal Hervey,Que. Combined
CN 79 Psgr. Daily Hervey
CN 8 Psgr. Daily ottawa
CN 35 Psgr. Sunday Montreal
only
CN (old)Psgr. Ex.Friday Montreal
39 & Sunday
CN L~4 Psgr. Daily Brockville
45
CN 673 RDC Daily Toronto
674. Railiner
NP 13 psgr. Daily Hinnipeg
lL~
GN 357 Psgr. Daily Vancouver
358 International
CP 203 Sunday Montreal
204 only
CP 339 Daily Toronto
340
CP 380 Ex.Sunday Toronto
383
CP 382 Ex.saturday Toronto
385 & Sunday
CP 388 Saturday Toronto
389 only
CP 301 RDC Daily calgary
302
CP 305 RDC Daily Calgary
SOME SUPPIEMENTARY NOTES:
Montreal, Que.
Montreal, Que.
ottawa
with 76
Combined
with 72-172
Combined
with 30-130
Ot tawa Comb ine d
with 7
Toronto Combined
with 54-55
North Bay Reduce to
Sat.-Sun.
Fargo,N.D.
Seattle,Hash.
She rb rooke, Que.
Hindsor, Ont .
Peterboro,Ont. Old 380-383
Peterboro,Ont. Old 382-385
Peterboro, Ont.
Edmonton,Alta.
Edmonton, Al ta.
CNs Train (old) 139 was renumbered 39; CP RAIL Trains 384,386 and
387 were renumbered 380,382 and 383 respectively. They run Toronto
to Peterboro and Havelock.
Algoma Central RaiJ,.ways Train 1 operates Monday,l1ednesday and Fri­
day and Train 2 operates Tuesday,Thursday and saturday. Last winter
CANADIAN 334 R A I L
both trains operated on Saturday, requiring two sets of equipment.
CNs Senneterre-Noranda-Rouyn Trains 174-175 now require two sets
of equipment, due to combinir.g of the Montreal-Hervey Service .lh­
ich causes Train 75 to arrive at Senneterre 1 hr. 45 mins. later
and Train 74 to leave 1 hr. 30 mins. earlier.
FARE THEE HELL !
This is the slogan used by Canadian National for its Red,ltlh­
ite and Blue fare plan, but it does not conceal the fact that a
general increase in the lowest Red fares and some of the inter­
mediate -.Ihite prices (but only a very few top or Blue fares)
has tended to diminis h the margin between them. Typtcal increases
1ere: Montreal to Vancouver or Prince Rupert,B.C.,$ 5.00; to Ed­
monton,Alta.,$ 4.00; to ivinnipeg,Man., $ 2.00; to Halifax,N.S.,
$ 1.50; to Toronto,ont., $ 1.00; to Chicago, Ill., $ 0.80; To ot­
tawa, $ 0.35; to Sherbrooke,Que., $ 0.30.
The Halifax,N.S.-Vancouver,B.C. transcontir.ental fare was only
raised $ 3.00. These increases were confined to Red days .CP RAIL
passenger tariffs are only slightly higher for long-distance trips
bet.leen eastern and western canada, but much higher f.or short dis­
tance journeys. For example,CNs Port Arthur,Or.t.-iHnnipeg,Man.tab
is $ 11.00 on a Red day while CP from Fort William,Ont. to Itlin­
nipeg is $ 20.50,B1JI the fare is the same for the Sudbury-vlinnipeg
journey,an additional mileage of 551 miles .passengers w-ill please
refrain from sharpening their pencils while the train is standing
in the stationl
::
::::a :ac
At
The Editor
Photo by K.G.Younger
Manitoba representative ,Mr. K.
Gordon Younger,sent us news
from Winnipeg on several im-
portant topics. First on his
list were a few details on the
ageless Countess of Dufferin.
Once again,the Countess made the headlines in the Winnipeg
FREE PRESS in August,wherein was printed a picture showing the buf­
fer beam of the locomotives tender in a sad and rather decayed st­
ate. This illustration served to point up the continuing contro­
versy between Winnipeg and St. Boniface on the continuing theme of
the Countess i future. There was some talk that the veteran loco­
motive would be enshrined in Winnipegs Transportation Museum, un­
der cover at last,after all these years,but this hope was dashed
when the Federal Government began an expense-reduction progranune ,
known
in some quarters (DBS) as the Big Freeze. It is possible
that Manitobas new New Democratic party government will adopt
this proposal as a Provincial Centennial Project for 1970, the
Provinces Ce.ntennial Year. Spec ial consideration will be given to
contractors willing to take part or all of the ir fee in wheat!
A great hue-and-cry from citizens and politiclans alike er­
upted when someone discovered that Canadian National might be th­
lnking of withdrawing the famous campers Special,-the service
that operates between Hinnipeg and Farlane,Ontario. Although this
service is generally supplied simply through extra coaches on the
eastbound panorama, it is improbable that in the face of all this
drum-beating,CN will have the courage to terminate this historic
(and to many, essential) sununertlme service.
e 😡 c :::a
THE PRAiRIE DOG CENTRAL -Winnipeg Hydros no. 3 4-4-0,combination
snd two passenger coaches was all steamed up this past summer,-but
at CNs Transcona Shops and for the benefit of a few hard-working
nearly dissolusioned promoters. While no definite plans can yet ba
nounced,prospects are bright for public operation in 19701
Photo Vintage Locomotive Society.
car
only
and
an-
CANADIAN
336
R A I L
Despite a deal of devoted drum-beating in another quarter
Number 3 of i1innipeg Hydro and train of Kewaunee Central combine
and two Greater oJinnipeg water District coaches was unable to make
a
st-art during the summer in public passenger service, reports in
other journals notwithstanding. Beleaguered on all sides by bene­
volent barristers and legal luminaries,each desirous of protect­
ing the unsuspecting public from bodHy harm,a sufficient number
of delaying tactics were implemented to prevent revenue operation.
Nonetheless,Number 3 was (privately) steamed up at Transcona Shops
on August 9 and a satj_sfactory number of slides and movies were
taken as the brave old veteran steamed up and down a short stretch
of track., Sale of shares in the Vintage Locomotive Society has
declined slightly toward the end of the summer, but support for
this commendable project may still be offered by interested per-
sons through their purchase at par ($ 1) from the Society at 267
Ve rnon Road, vJinn ipeg 12, Man. The hard -working promote rs of the
project SIILL hope to have Number 3 and three -car train operating
in 19701 They certainly deserve our enthusiastic support.
c ::c
Winnipeg Hydros Number 3,a Canadian Pacific day coach and Hydros
combine pose at the Greater Winnipeg Ilater District Railways sta­
tion at vlinnipeg on June 8,1968, Two C ,P ,R, day coaches.. acquired
by the Vintage Locomotive Soc1ety,1lere subsequently traded to G,),
!v,D. for tolO old-time day coaches,to form a real IIperiod train.
Bruce West
Toronto GLOBE AND MAIL.
The
following article is reproduced with the kind permission of Mr.
Bruce West,columnist with the Toronto GLOBE AND MAIL.
~here was a report not long ago that the
ivhi te pa ss and Yukon Route, one of my
favourite railways,was at last begin­
ning to make a little money. This
must be quite refreshing for the Br­
itish shareholders of the W.P.& Y.R.
whi.ch for a long time didnt make
any money,despite the fact that its
110.7 miles of line between White­
horse, Yukon and Skagway, Alaska, is
one of the most spectacularly beau­
tiful railways in the world.
At its highest point, the line reaches an elevation of
2,916 feet. Of the total trackage,20.4 miles are in Alaska, 32.2
are in British Columbia and 58.1 are in the Yukon. Once, back in
March,l944,the train was snowbound in the mountains for 31 days!
Altilough the W.P.& Y.R. tries gamely to run on time, the
crew isnt dismayed by unexpected delays of one kind or another.
Sometimes a truculent grizzily bear challenges the train for the
right-of-way and other animals hold it up from time to time.Once
when I was riding the line from Whitehorse to Skagway, the train
passed a section hands boarding house ,where several men sat on
the veranda,wearing arm-slings and bandages. Those who could mo­
ve
an arm waved cheerily as we went by and the conductor told me
that a few days earlier,this section. crew came speeding around
a corner on a jigger and ran smack into a large bull moose. The
conductor at that time was a fine tale-spinner named Bill Beitin­
ger,who had worked for 32 years on the line.
We hit Ernie Johnsons horse at Mile 89, one day, he told me.
So we stopped the train to take a look at the damage. The horse
appeared to be lying there nearly dead beside the track,so I got
out an axe to finish off the poor animal. Just as I was about to
take a swing at it,the horse jumped to its feet,as spry as all get
out,and galloped off into the hills. Well,sir,that horse lived lon­
ger than Ernie dld. But he sure gave our train a wide berth after
that. All ,e had to do was to toot the whistle a couple of times
and hed head for the woods.
The White pass & Yukon Railway was built during the roaring
Klondike Gold Rush days of 1898. It is said that there is probably
no railroad in the world that was built by such a highly-educated
gang of labourers. Many of the hands were doctors,lawyers and sch­
ool-teachers who had gone broke while trying to get to Dawson City
and had had to take a job on the railway to replenish their stakes!
During the second World War,the railway carried a huge ton­
nage of fre ight from Skagway, for use in the build ing of the North­
west staging Route (a chain of airstrips) and the Alaska Highway.
In recent years,it has been modernized to carry freight in spec­
ial containers,three to a car,which can be refrigerated in summer
and heated in winter. Freight hauling is still its most important
activity,but tourists who have been lucky enough to ride the nar­
row-gauge line through the mountains,maintain that it is still
one of the greatest experiences a jaded tourist can have,with the
possible exception of a trip to the Moon!
c ::::ac oac :::w
A contrast in power. The W.P.& Y.R.s cab units were built by General –
Electric,while no. 105,one of the newest,pictured here on e CP RAIL flat
at Hochelege Yerds,CP RAIL,et 8.00 p.m.,June 6,1969,was en MLW-WDRTHING­
ton Product. 105 photo courtesy R. len Stronach,GE unit R.M.Binns.
BY F.A. KEMF
THE CASE OF THE MOVING MULTIMARKS.
When CP RAILs Multimark symbol is applied to
diesel units, its positioning often poses a pro­
blem. The MLW-WORTHINGTON built 8700s have
them on the radiator shutters,so that they dis­
appear when the shutters are open. When the new
c-630 units 4550-4553 were delivered, they had a
large area of screening on each side below the
cooU.ng radiator fan. The MulU.marks were th­
ere:ore applied ahead of the radiator sectl.on.
~hen the screens were replaced with louvres,wh-
ich are more practical for winter-time opera-
tion, the Multimarks Vlere repainted at the
rear of the units. Anyone who photographed these
units during their trial period now has a unique
picture.
CP RAIL GALJ~RY CARS.
The first of the nine-car bi-level fleet of commuter cars being
built by Carjadian Vickers Limited, was scheduled to appear on CP
RAIL
rails in November,1969,following a delay in completion due to
technical difficulties. Half of November passed, and none of the
neVi cars were seen.
A NEW RAILWAY IN AN ANCIENT LAND.
The Hejaz Railway,an S15-mile line from Damascus,Syria to Medina,
Saudi Arabia,opened by the Turks in 1907 when both countrieS were
part of the ottoman Empire and subsequer.tly destroyed by Arab
tribesman led by Colonel T.E.Lawrence and other British officers,
is presently being rehuilt. The Arab revolt,which began in 1916 ,
resulted in the blowing-up of 2,000 bridges and culverts of thi.s
railway, causing the Turks to withdraw into Syria where they sur­
rendered in 1918. Now,Eng1ish engineers are working to reconstr-
uct the work of forcible abandonment directed by Lawrer.ce of
Arabia. It is expected that the first trainload of pilgrims to
the famous Mohammedan shrine at Mecca,near Medina,wi11 travel on
the new line in 1972.
TURBOTRAINS IN-1970 -MAYBE !
The trouble-plagued TURBOs,bul1t by MLW-VlORTHINGTON
to United Aircraft Company of Canadas designs, for
CANADIAN
3.40
R A I L
rental to Canadian National Railways for their Mon­
treal-Toronto service,are expected to begin regular
test runs in JanuarY,1970 and continue through the
winter until April. If reliable operation can be es­
tablished,they will begin revenue (public) operation
with the April,1970 time change. Only three of the
train sets will be used and UAC will attempt to dis­
pose of the others,possibly for a mini-TURBO cor­
ridor operation on the Illinois Central Railroad
between Chicago and Carbondale,Illinois.
CANADIAN RAILWAYS SEEK DISCONTINUANCE.
As predicted by some Canadian National officials,CN and CP RAIL ap­
plied to the Railway Transport Committee of the Canadian Transport
Commission on November 5th.,for permission to discontinue 31 pas­
senger train services,effective January 7,1970. These would in­
clude ALL passenger services operated by CP RAIL,except the sub­
urban serviceS in the Montreal area. The services affected include
CP ~ILs standard-bearer The Canadian,on which the Company says
they lose $19,500,000 ;the Atlantic Limited betwe.en Montreal and
Saint John,N.B. and other rur.s for a total of 19 or 21,depending
on how they are counted. Examples of CN services to be cut include
Montreal-Chicoutimi,Dolbeau-Chambord,Quebec-Senneterre-Cochrane ;
Quebec-Chicoutimi;Senneterre-Noranda-Rouyn; La Tuque-parent;parent­
Senneterre. Also, the Montreal-Moncton portion of the Chaleur is
to be combined with the Scotian,while the panorama would dis­
appear,although two sections of the Super Continental would op­
erate during the summer months.
If the Railway Transport Committee of C.T.C. should require any of
these services to be continued, the railway companies Till become
eligible for subsidies to the extent of 80% of the lOSses which rs­
sult. Despite angry reactions from members of Canadas House of
Commons,Government officials have so far declined to interfere in
the dOings of the Canadian Transport Commission. There will, un­
doubtedly, be further applications from CN and l1earings and other
procedures will almost certainly keep these trains running long
past the terminal date of January 7,1970.
DISAPPEARING STAT IONS.
Railway stations continue to disappear or to be converted for other
uses. Craigleith station,on CNs Barrie-Meaford,Ont. line,recently
became a restaurant. The land on which the station was first built
was given by Alexander Fleming, father of Sir Sandford Fleming, one
of Canadas most prominent railway engineers in the last half of
the nineteenth century,who was especially noted for his lork in
building the Nova Scotia Railway, the Intercolonial Railway and the
Canadian Pacific Railway and in his promotion and perfection of
the use of time-zones and Standard Time. Petersburg station on the
CNs Toronto-Stratford-Sarnia line near Kitchener,Ont.,has been
moved to the Doon Pioneer Village,north of Kitchener. This station
was built in 1856 on a piece of land sold to the Grand Trunk Rail-
CANADIAN 341 R A I L
way by Peter Wilker, for whom the village was named. Mr. Wilker set­
tled in the area,along with many other immigrants from Germany, in
1832.
THOSE HIGH-CUBE BOXES.
Chesapeake & Ohio Car Ferry No. 12 has beer. sold
to Canadiar. National Railways for ferrying high­
cube box cars ar.d automobile transporters which
are too large to go through CN-GTW Sarnia Tunr.el.
Presumably existing dockir.g facilities at Port
Huron and Sarnia will be used.
ClCDDClODoooa
K.Gordon Younger,the Associations representative in Winnipeg,Man.,
writes that Hinnipegs Mayor Steven Juba is under increasing pres­
sure to make a decision regarding the future preservation of the
Countess of Dufferin,-the veteran ex-C .P.R. 4-4-0 presently pre­
served (after a fashion) in front of CP RAILs Winnipeg depot. The
condition of this historic locomotive has deteriorated to the point
where a recent visitor from the United States was moved to send the
Mayor a cheque for $10.00 to be put toward rehousing of the loco­
motive. The Mayor recently reported to Winnipegs Finance Committee
that consideration was being glven to the construction of a trans­
portation museum on a parking lot north of the police station on
Rupert Avenue. He recommended that,should plans materialize within
the next 3 months, the Countess be placed in the cus tody of the
Provincial Centennial Corporation.
The Countess arrived at Winnipeg, via the Red River steamer Sel­
kirk on October 8,1877. She was used in the westward cor.struction
of the C.P.R. and finished her working days shunting in the yards
of the Columbia River Lumber Company at Golden,B.C.,at the west­
ern entrance to Kicking Horse pass. l>linnipeg Mayor Richard D.waugh
apparently discovered her there in 1909 and had her returned to
IHnnipeg, where she has remained to this day.
In and around vancouver,Doug Cummings notes that Great Northern is
converting a reported 10 units (freight F7s) for passenger service
and renumbering them in the 380 series. These units are chiefly of
the 1953 vintage. Older passer.ger units of the 1946 era are being
converted to freight operation, with steam generators and other par­
ts as by-products.GN has discontinued trains 357 & 358 (morning In­
ternational) Vancouver to Blaine,Wash., the last run being on Octo­
ber 25.During the last week of service,the consist wai two F units
and one coach.Previously,they had a baggage car,as well.
pacific Great Eastern is progressing slowly with convers ion of the
ex-Spol~ane, port!l.and & Seattle FB2 B unit to a ROBOT-type control
car to house LOCOTROL. Tests are expected to be made in late Decem­
ber or early January. One of PGEs new Century 630 s wHl be the
master unit.
On vancouver Island,MacMillan Bloedel has anr.ounced termination of
their raihlay operation in three or four months,with trucking of

CANADIAN
343
R A I L
logs as a substitute. This would result in a straight truck haul
from the-Copper canyon and Nanatmo River operations to the mill at
Chemainus. Reason for the change is said to be high freight rates
charged by CP RAIL (vlhich itse If owns an interest in MacMillan-Bloe­
dell) from the junction at Diamond yard to the mill at Chemainus .
This threatens the future of Comox Logging & RailvTays operation,as
Comox shared 15 miles of trackage with M-B, using M-B locomotives
whenever the ir Baldwin d iese 1 (a remarkable object) broke down. It
looks like Comox will have a choice: Buy a second diesel,makes an
agreement with M-B to retain a locomotive for standby protectton
or go truck. Time alone will tell.
With a target-date of late January,1971,construction of the connec­
tion from CP RAILs main line to the Roberts Bank Superport is pro­
gresstng,with track-laying begun in late October.Little heavy con-
struction work remains except pos itioning of the overpass bridge
structure over double-divided Trans Canada Highway south of Mission.
Notwithstanding this report,CP RAIL moved Track Gang No. 1 back
east in October,reportedly because of difficulties in securing the
necessary rieht-of-way privileges from area property-owners.
BACK IN 1968,the White pass & Yukon Route placed an order with ALCO
Products Incorporated of Schnectady,N.Y. for seven new diesel units
ALCO Products was unable to complete the building of these diesels
and transferred the order to MLW -WORTHINGTON (Montreal) in December
1968. The new units,now complete,carry builders plates showing
ALCO Products Inc. as the builder and c/n s 6023-01 to -07, dated
5-69. They are model DL-535E, MU-equipped and have a shortened ver­
sion of the CC Trimount truck. Mars lights are mounted on the cab
roofs and the body colours are Read ing green and yellow, with
black underbodies. A late report from Doug Cummings of Vancouver
says that on October 15,fire destroyed H .P.& Y.R. s Skagway Shops
togethe r with two of the brand-ne1 diese 1 units. One 2-8-2 steamer
in use as a stationery boiler was also destroyed. This puts the
White pass in a very awkward position with the advent of winter,as
shop facilities are essential at this location and in this climate.
Quebec,North Shore & Labradors six nevi SD_L~O s ex General Motors
Diesel,London,Ont.,in December,1968 had quite a tlme getting to
Sept-Iles,Que.Delayed by a strike at the Iron Ore Company, the
units vie re leased to CN and CP RAIL until AprU 30 and then stored
at CNs Montreal yard until August 20. On August 21,they were loa­
ded for shipment to Sept-Iles. Nos. 203 and 204,as vTell as 201 and
202 were leased by CN. NoS. 200 & 205 went on least to CN first but
ended up leased by CP RAIL. Photo courtesy R. Ian Stronach.
UNITS NUMBERS 203 & 204 of the Quebec,North Shore and Labrador Railway,
loaded as deck cargo at Montreal,on their way to ths Company rails at
Sept-Iles,Que. Photo courtesy R. Ian Stronsch.
Selviug you in so many ways
McNally -MONTREAL STAR
Courtesy Canada Wide Feature Service
CANADIAN RAIL
published Inonthly exoept July & August OOInbined)
by the
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION ~~~:~QU~~ .
Assooiate MeInbership 1 no 1 uding 11 issues of
Canadian Rail 8.00 annually.
EDITOR S. Worthen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beatty & F.F.Angus
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP AND BRANCHES
Mr. J.A.Beatty, 4982 Queen Mary Road, Montreal
248, Quebec, Canada.
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA
Mr.M.lveson I Sec.ty •• P,O.Box 352, Terminal A Ottawa onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN Mr. Donald W.Scs(e 12407 Lansdowne Urlve, Apt. 101, Edmonton Alta.
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY
SASKATCHEWAN
PACIFIC COAST
FAR
EAST
BRITISH ISLES
Y ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. ), 67 Somerset St. W., Ottawa, Ontario.
J .S.Nicholson, 2)06 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Peter Cox, 29)6 West 28th. Ave., Vancouver, Brl tlsh Columbia.
W. D.McKeown, 6 .. 7 I 4-chome, Yamate-cho, Sui ta Cl ty, Osaka, Japan ..
J .H.Sanders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Beds., England.
K.G.Younger. 267 Vernon Hoad, Winnipeg. Manitoba.
Mr. Donald W.Scafe. 12407 lansdowne Drive. Apto 101, Edmonton Alta
o
Copyright 1969 printed in canada
on Canad ian pape r

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