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Canadian Rail 198 1968

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Canadian Rail 198 1968

No.1ea
April 1968

CANADIAN
Brandon,Man
88 R A I L
6 hrs.57 mins. Engine 8565 faileo
and steam generator
of no. 8566 waa only
producing at low fire
and water pump was
not operating at cap­
acity.
It was also necessary to water Engine 1400,the cafe car and the
diner and thaw out the balance of the train on the shop trackl
ON THE BROADVIEW SUBDIVISION, Number 1 west did not fare much
better,as follows:
Broadvisw,Sask.
Indian Head,Sask.
Moose Jaw,Sask.
15 mins. ~duced speed to main­
tain steam heat to
rear vehicles;
2 mins. Time lost watering all
steam generator tanks.
15 mins. Add Engine 8501 to
head-end.
56 mins. Service all engine
units and train;
Cut in Engine 8501
behing Engine 1400.
MEANWHILE,NUMBER 2 EAST was about to encounter similar diffi-·
culties in Saskatchewan snd Manitoba. From Swift Current to Moose
Jaw,nine minutes were lost owing to reduced speed running in bliz­
zard conditions. Two hours were lost at Moose Jaw, Disconnecting
Engine 8560 and thawing out the eteam generator. Eest of this point,
operation of the blue-ribband train resembled that of a way-freight:
Rufus,Sask.
Regine,Sask.
Kenmay,Sask.
McLean,Sask.
Indian Hsad,Sask.
Woleslay,Sask.
8 mine. Difficulty moving th­
rough Siding as crew
were
uneble to lin~
switch which was bl­
ocked with snow; 4
mine. Set off 1 sleeper and
add 1
sleeper,-swit­
ching very slow;
16 mins. Meet No. 1 and clean
switches;
8 mins. Stop to build up low
steam pressure to re~
ar of train;
1 hr. 8 mine. Thaw out steam gener­
ator on Engine 8560,
and water all steam
generator tanks;
10 mine. Delay in entraining
passengere.
CANADIAN
89
R A I L
BLIZZARD CONDITIONS CONTINUED on the Indian Head Subdivision,
and additional time was lost:
(Throughout)
Broadview,Sask.
Moosomin,Sask.
Virden,Man
Broadview Subdivision:
(Throughout)
Brandon,Man 1
hr. 7 mins. Reduced speed running
due to blizzard con­
di tions;
1 hr.25 mins. Maintenance on steam
gene~ators of Engines
1400 & 8501 j Thawing
out cars YOHo
PARK & DRAPER MANOR,
CHATEAU IBERVILLE and
CHATEAU RoUVILLEj
30 mins. Watering generator
tanks on Engines 1400
& 8501 j 1
hr. 5 mins. Add water to steam
generator tanks on
Engs.140o & 8501,and
add Eng. 4095. Build
up low steam pressure
to rear cars of train.
2 hrs.17 mins. Reduced speed to main­
tain steam pressure to
rear of train;
29 mins. Water and fuel all
uni ts;
Thaw steam traps on
dining car YORK and
sleeper yoHo PARKj
CANADIAN
CARBERRY SUBDIVISION:
m.p.129.4
Austin,Men.
Portage la PrBirie,Man.
(Throughout)
90
R A I L
25 mins. Red signal (stop) due
to snow in switch;
6 mins. Extra passenger stop;
35 mins. Water steam generator
tanks on Engines 4095 and 1400j
39
mins. Reduce speed to main­
tain steam pressure
to rear of train.
FINALLY,WHEN EASTWARD NUMBER 2 rolled into the station at
Winnipeg,an additional 15 minutes were lost while the sleeper
KOKANNEE PARK was substituted for YOHO PARK,-the latter being
totBily unserviceable because its water-raising system was com­
pletely frozen up! Moreover,time was required to thaw out the
steam regulators and retarders of the CHATEAU IBERVILLE and CH~
ATEAU RDUVILLE,at the rear of the train.
SOME ASPECTS OF RAILROADING in Canada may have changed over
the hundred-odd years of its history,but the battle between roen,
their machines and the weather continues with unrelenting ferocity!
When it(s Springtime in the Rockies,-or in the Maritimes, it may
not necessarily be clear and bright on the Indian Head Sub.!
COVER
The snow was piled high on both sides of st. James street, on a
bright winter day some seventy years ago , as Montreal Park and
Island Ry. car No, 21 headed west,bound for Lachine. Car No. 21
was built by Rathbun of Deseronto ontario in 1897 or 1896. Later
re-nu.mbered in the 1000 series of suburban cars, and twice rebu.ilt
it ended its days in rush hour service on the Montreal Tramways
Cos lines in the late 1920s. Photo from the collection of Mr.
FoF.Angus.
OUR READERS WRITE
Mr. Frank F. Hoses, one of our members in Toronto, Ont., is
interested in a history of one of Torontos suburban electric
railway lines. I hope that some day you ill print an article
(with pictures, if possible) on the Toronto and York Radial
Railay. CANADIAN HAIL ould be glad to hear from any of its
readers Vlho might be interested in putting together such a
history. Pictures do not usually present a problem -it is
the text thats hard to find!
At
the
East
end
of
the
yard
at
Farnham
Quebec,
Canadian
Pacific
Railway
2 –
8 –
2
No
o
5375
simmers
in
the
summer
sun.
Engineer
R.Gariepy,
in
the
cab
went
on
pension
in
1956-7,
and
his
faithful
steamer
was
retired
a
year
or
two
latero
Photo
courtesy
J.L.J.Mercier.
,
.,
AJLJL~§TEEJL MOTORS
OJF THE
P.Murphy.
-:l[Mhe year 1915 saw the inaugural run of what was
undoubtedly the most modern and elahorate
interurban cars ever seen in C8nada.These
remarkable cars made their debut on the
London and Port Stanley Railway, in that
year. The original order was for 5 motor
cars. The specifications were drawn up by
the Ontario Hydroelectric Commission, act­
ing for the City of London,Ontario.
The new cars were fifty nine feet overall length and weighed some
92,920 lbs. each,in operating condition. They were of all-steel con-
struction and of a design approaching that used for vehicles in
heavy main-line railroad service.
The design was developed as the result of intensive study of exis­
ting equipment and took full advantage of the experience gained on
.
railway lines which had had many years of experience, USing this
kind of vehicle. These new cars ran on trucks spaced at 34 1/2 ft.
with 36 inch wheels on a seven foot wheelbase.
POlder was supplied by four 125 h.p.750 volt electric motors,and the
maximum operating speed was controlled at 49 miles per hour. These
cars provided excellent service until the passenger traffic exceeded
the vehicle capacity and capahility,whereupon additional equipment
was ordered.
The following account from the L. & P.S.Annual Reports ending with
the year 1919,describes the situation at that time:
PHOTO OPPOSITE
This 1922 view of a typical Lo& P.S. five car train headed by No.14
now in the Canadian Railway Museum, along with No. 10. Note t~e gold
panels, and crest, also the wooden trailers of classis design.
Photo courtesy of Mr. Ray Corley
CANADIAN
94
R A I L
The passenger equipment of the railway at
thR commencement of operations in 1915 was
knOI~n to be sljfficient for a substAntial
increase in travel over what had been the
patronage of the road in the days of steam
operation. It consisted of five 50 foot
all-steel three-compartment motor cars and
three 60 foot tldo-compartment steel-under­
frame trailer cars. The first seasons op­
eration developed the popularity of Fort
Stanley to such an extent that traffic mul­
tiplied beyond all expectations, and it
became quite evident that the equipment
provided at the outset was insufficient
to handle the crowds in the new regieme.
In consequence of these conditions, orders
were ~iven for three additional trail cars
and contracts WAre let to the Jewett Car
Company of Newark,Ohio,U.S.A.,for the con­
struction of two 7n foot three-compartment
all-steel motor cars,to be delivered by
July 1 st.,1917. Four 72 foot coaches were
also purchased and remodelled into trail
cars,to be used for summer excursion bus­
iness.
With this increased equipment,the Rail~ay is at
present able to handle its traffic expeditiously
and comfortahly,without having to rent rolling
stock from the steam roads,except on exception­
ally busy days.
Multiple unit control is also provided for the
nassenger motor cars and master controllers are
mounted on both ends of motor cars and trailers.
By this means,it is possible to control a train
of ten or twelve coaches from any operating pos-­
itinn. This feature results in a great saving nf
time in making up trains,and greatly lessens the
danqer of accidents to passengers.
The motor cars are equipped with four 125 h.p.750
volt motors, each insulated for 1,500 volts poten­
tial,the balanCing speed on level track,with 1400
volts is 49 miles per hour,and according to the
~uarantees,aach car is capable of hauling a trail­
er continuously in local service between London
and
Port Stanley. Current is taken from the wira
by means of pantagraph-trollays,l~hich are raised
and lowered by air pressure under the control of
a storage battery carried on each motor car.
Such trolleys are used, rather than the older wheel
types,in order to save time at switches and turn­
outs. The pantagraph is particularly suited to ser­
vice on switching locomotives,where it would be
virtually impossibla to turn the trolley pole each
time the locomotive reversed its diredtion.All the
electrical equipment was bought from the Canadian
General Electric Company, Toronto.

All
Steel Motor
Cars
for London and Port Stanley Railway.
_
…..
LIW
UIoU
mIl mIl mIl mIl mIl
mIl
!IIIl~
_____
_
-,
,,:9-

U
I
1)1
:
!!
-il

9l
!~I~
. . I ..
….
:/
~
:
~

—-

·

·.
·–·–<>—

-J,:I/–;–r-
.
b
.u


~
~


:
5,-,,
··


Z9J


-29
=
,5–
–.——–

~
.
! i
.1
1
CANADIAN
97
R A I L
The interior fittings and finish of the passenger
cars are of the highest class and travellers have
many times observed that their egual is not seen
on any other cars operating on this continent.The
over-all width of these cars is 9 feet 6 inches,
and allows as much seat room as is available on
standard steam road coaches.To make the cars as
comfortable as possi~le,and to gain for the Rnil­
way the enviable re[lutation ,,,11ich it has earned
no eRpense was spared. With this purpose, electric
heaters were installed beneath each seat, heavy
linoleum is used over the insulated ,oDden floors
dnuble r.ri.nnolds are prnvidwl for winter operation,
while the liqhting fixtures luhich are of very
pleasing apnearance,are equipped with high power
lamps. In all other respects,the coaches are
suited to such a stnndard of excellence.
The interiors are ornamented by the best selec­
ted, inlaid mahogany,in natural sanitary fin­
ish. This includes all doors,mouldings,etc.,
while the trimmings throughout the cars are
of solid brass. The average weiqht per seat­
ed passenger is 1,200 pounds.
photo above lhis rare photograph Views the first L&PS
electric passenger car northbound, loading at the Port stan­
ley Station, on July 4, 1915.
Photo courtesy Ontario Hydro Commission •
PHOTO: Page 95 car # 12. in 1922. Colleption Mr. Ray Corley.
I
I •
,,)
CANADIAN 99 R A I L
Some nDtes regarding the cars shDwn in the fDIIDwinq table are Df
interest. ND. B was heavily damaged by fire, early in 1925. It was
rebuilt by Canadian Car and FDundry Limited,Montreal. No. B was
the third (mDtDr) car in a three-car train. While making its reg­
ular run, fire brDke DUt in the middle trailer car,and,fanned by
the mDtiDn Df the train, rapidly spread tD the rear mDtDr car,-nD.
B • The cars were hurriedly uncDu~led,and the fire in the middle
trailer was extinguished. HDwever,number B,-the rear mDtDr car,
was a tDtal IDss.
ND. Builder Year Length CDm~artments Rebuilt
2 Jewett 1915 59 3
4 Jewett 1915 59 3
6
Jewett 1915 59 2
8 JelJet t 1915 59 3 1925
10
Jewett 1915 59 3
12 Jewett 1917 70 3
14 Jewett 1917 70 3
The cDIDur scheme used Dn these cars was Driginally an evergreen
shade enamel with gDld striping and lettering. There were gDld
panel frames Dn the frDnt and sides of the cars. Later, the mDre
elabDrate striping and crest were eliminated,leaving Dnly the lat-
. tering mn qDld alDng the rDDf-line Df the green enamel bDdy.
Numbers
2,6 and 12 were scrapped by the railway. Numbers 10 and
14 were acquired by the Canadian Railway Museum,OelsDn/St-CDnstant
QUB. Numbers 4 and B are presently being held in TDrDntD,apparent­
ly fDr the OntariD Museum Df Science and TechnDIDgy.
The
impact Df these cars in the early twentieth century is best sum­
marized in a qUDtatiDn frDm A Study in CDntrasts by the L. & P.S.:
The dilapidated platform cars and smDky,feeble IDcDmDtives, Luere
superceded by thDusand-horsepDwer,sDlid-vestibuled,fast and frequent
elflctric trains.
PHOTO: 4 car L&PS train #10, 11, 1, 8 -iq London Ontario
July 24, 1948. From the E.A.Toohey Collection.

CANADIAN NATIONAL R~ILWAYS
IN
-.-..
Purchases: up to 11 March 1968.
The serials for units 2002 to 204J are M-J491-01 to M-J491-42.
Retirements: up to 11 March 1968.
1) Unit 2203.
treated due
Ont3.rio.
retired on 10/08/67. (C.B. #192 and 1/195) was so
to extensive fire oamaEe sustained at Courtland.
2) Locomotive 9446. lead unit
circumstance to meet head-on
29 May 1967. As a result. it
/1192).
on Train 406, had the unfortunate
with Train 405 at Maccan. N.S. on
was retired on 07/08/67. (C.R.
J) Unit 4810 was retired on 01/11/67 (C.H. #195) due to fire damage.
Quebec Iron and Ti tanium: up to 11 ffJarch 1968.
Q.I.l. has ordered one DL-718B for use at Havre St. Pierre.
Delivery is expected in the second quarter of this year.
ERRATUM
1) Sharp readers will note that CN 1609 was listed in C.R. #195 as
being retired on JO/1J/67. But lol -it had already been retir­
ed on OJ/OJ/67 as listed in C.R. #187~ One is inclined to say
rude things at this juncture. but well content ourselves with
stating that it was unit 1629 that was retited on JO/11/67,
having been built by CLC on 16/01/5J, and carrying serial 2679.
JACK BEATTY AND ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP~ ••••
~embership is the essence of any organization,and
ours is no exceptionl In the past year, we have
endeavoured to expand our own to the greatest
possible extent,and our net position at year end
showed an
increase of 90 members over 1966.
WE ARE NOW IN THE PROCESS. of upgrading our promotional
material with the intent of securing new members. We have revised
our application Forms. A new brochure is being produced,-giving
a brieF history of the Association and its aims,an account of our
activities such as excursions, publications and museums.Copies will
be available shortly. We earnestly solicit the oooperation of all
to help our membership grow. Let me know the names of any prospec­
tive candtdates ,–well be glad to send them a Membership Kit –
providing Full particular~ of our activities.
YOU ARE ALL AI~ARE BY NOW that we have, reluctant ly, had to
raise our membership Fees For 1968. This was necessitated by the
ever increasing costs of operation. This advance in Fees has been
generally well received by the membership as a whole. For this,we
are extremely grateFul and we thank you,the members, For your under­
standing and cooperation.
BELATEDLY, WE KNOW THAT SOME. CONFUSION and inconvenience
was caused to our members in the United States,when we asked For
money. orders inpayment For 1968 dues. While this is quite a normal
procedure in Canada~the situation seems to be diFFerent in th~
United States,and quite Frankly,we had no idea of the diFFiculties
that would be encountered in purchasing them at banks and post of­
Fices in the U.S.A. Please acc~pt our apologies! Next time, just
send us your cheques,-well look aFter them!
A CAMPAIGN HAS BEEN STARTED to ensure that our members re­
ceive the best possible service,-by seeing that their correspon­
dance receives a prompt reply,-by minimizing delays in distribu­
tion of CANADIAN RAIL-and by endeavouring to rectiFy every cause
For complaint.
OUR PRIMARY OBJECTIVE is to look aFter the needs of our
members in every possible regard. Is there any way in which I can
help you with problems involving the Association 7 IF there is,
please let me know by writing to me directly at our post oFFice
box I
J.A.Beatty,Director,Membership and Branches.
….. c»
,
E=:a!I:
19&B
S.S. Worthen
Just in case you happen to be driving through one of Canadas
ten provinces -and 2 territories, in the summer of 1968, you
just might want to know if there are any steam locomotives
preserved in the vicinity -or within reasonable driving dis­
tance, after the family has been safely established at the
motel.
The following list has been prepared to indicate, on a trip
Ad· mare usque ad mare from east to west ,where you might be
expected to do a little picture-taking. At the time of writing,
there are two steam locomotives out of service, for which dis­
position has not been determined. TheBe are Canadian National
Railways numbers 5114 and 8447.
The·asterisks beside the name of the town or city indicate that
the engines are displayed to the public and in most cases, are
photographable. The 0 symbol indicates that the engines are
stored in private locations and are most probably not available
for photographs.
If you find, during your summer perambulations, that the infor­
mation provided is not correct, please write to the author,
care of CANADIAN RAIL, so that next. years list will be more
accurate.
* Cornerbrook
* New Glasgow
* Stellar ton
* Glace Bay
NEI~ FOUND LAND
Lady Bowater Park
Rotary Club of
Cornerbrook
NOVA SCOTIA
City of New Glasgow
Miners Museum
City of Stellar ton
Cape Breton Island
Miners Museum
#593 4-6-2 BINI 1920
ex CNR ex Nfld. Rys.
#193
Samson
0-6-0
ex General l1ining Assn.
Timothy Hackworth -1838
Albion 0-6-0
ex General Mining Assn.
(plate says Rayne & Byrn-
1854 )
#17 2-6-0
ex Old SYdney Colleries Ry.
CANADIAN
103
o ~renton Mr. Carl Tbibbetts
R A I L
#7262 0-6-0
ex CNR ex Drummond Col­
leries Ry.
#43
2-6-0
ex Acadia Coal Company
ex Old Sydney Colleries Ry.
#? 0-4-0ST
(narrow gauge)
o Westville Drummond Colleries Ltd. #? 2-6-2
nicknamed Georgia Peach.
PR INCE ED No locomotives preserved, so far as is known.
NEoJ BRUNSW ICK
* 110ncton Resources Park
QUEBF.C
* Sept lles City of Sept lles
Q.N.S.& L. Station
o Montreal H.J. OConnell Limited
(Dorval)
o Montreal Canadian National Ry.
(C.N.R.) Pointe St-Charles Shops
* Montreal Canadian Raih/ay Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
#5270 4-6-2 MLW 1918·
ex CNR
ex CGR #498
#702 4-6-2 CLC 1921 ex Q.N.S.& L. Ry. 702 ex O.N.R. #702 ex T.& N.O. Ry.
#702, 759,
159.
#46 4-6-4T NLW 1914 ex
CNR #46
ex GTR #1541
#8447
0-8-0 Lima 1923 ex
CN 8222 ex
GTR 1873
#49 4-6-4T 11L14 1914
ex CNR #49
ex GTR #1544
#1112
4-6-0 MLW 1912 ex Q.N.S.& L Ry. #1112 ex
CNR #1112
ex CNoR #1112
CANADIAN 104
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway l1useum
(Delson)
* Hontreal Canadian Railway Nuseum
(Delson)
* Nontreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Raih.,ay Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Dorval)
* Montreal Canadian RailHay Museum
(Delson)
* l10ntreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
R A I L
#1165 4-6-0 MLW 1912
ex CNR #1009
ex CGR 1/4529
#1520 4-6-0 CLC 1906
ex CNR #1223
ex CNoR #1223, #83
#2
601 2-8-0 HTJ;I 1907
ex GlR 11746
#3239 2-8-2 CLC 1916
ex CGR #2839
#4190 2-10-2
CLC 1924
ex CNR /14100
#5550 4-6-2 MLW 1914
ex CGR #451
#5702 4-6-4 11111 1930
ex CNR If 5702
/16015 4-8-2 CLC 1923
ex CNR /16015
* Montreal Canadian Raih.,ray Museum #6153 4-8-4 NLh 1929
(De1son) ex CNR /16153
* i10ntreal
(Delson)
* Montreal
(Delson)
* l10ntreal
(Delson)
* Hontreal
(Delson)
* Montreal
(Delson)
Canadian Railway l1useum #29 4-4-0 CPR 1887
ex CPR #29, 217, 390
Canadian Railway Museum
Ca
nadian Railway Huseum
Canadian Railway Huseum
Canadian Railway Museum
#144 4-4-0 CPR 1886
ex CPR #144, 230, 351
#492
4-6-0 CPR 1914
ex CPR #492
#999
4-6-0 MUI 1912
ex CPR #999, 2774
#2231 4-6-2 CPR 1914
ex CPR #2231
* l10ntreal Canadian Railway Museum #2341 4-6-2 MLW 1926
(Delson) ex CPR #2341
* Montreal
(Delson)
* Montreal
(Delson)
* Montreal
(Delson)
* Montreal
(Delson)
Canadian Railway Huseum
Canadian Railway Museum
Canadian Railway Huseum
Canadian Railway Museum
#2850 4-6-4 MLW 1938
ex CPR #2850 ROYAL HUDSON
#2928 4-4-4 CLC 1938
ex CPR #2928 JUBILEE
#3388 2-8-0 ALCO 1902
ex CPR #3388, 1588, 1239
#5468
2-8-2 MLW 1948
ex CPR #5468
CANADIAN
105
* Montreal Canadian
(Delson)
Railway Museum
* Hontreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Hontreal
(Delson)
Canadian Railway Huseum
* Montreal Canadian Railway Huseum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Raihlay Museum
(Delson)
* Hontreal Canadian Raihofay l1useum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Jv[useum
(Delson)
* Nontreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway ~ruseum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
* Montreal Canadian Railway Museum
(Delson)
ONTARIO
R A I L
#5935 2-10-4 ]·1LW 1949 ex
CPR #5935 SELKIRK
#6271 0-6-0
ex CPR #6271
CPR 1913
#7000 B-B (various)
ex CPR #7000
ex Iv1ara thon Paper Cor p •
#2 0-4-0ST MLW 1925 ex
E, B. Eddy Co. Hull
#3 0-4-0S1 MLW 1915 ex
Ste-Anne Paper Co.
#4 0-6-0 MLW 1914 #7000
ex
Nat, Harbours Board #4
#5 4-6-0 Pittsburgh 1895 ex
Maritime Ry, (or f96) ex
Fauquier F-5 1920 ex P,&L,E,
RR. #9150, 78
119 Bo H .K. Por ter 1928 ex
Merrilees Equipment Co,
#25 2-4-0 BLW 1900 ex 0 ,S
,C, #25 COLUI1BIA
#54 0-6-0T Brighton 1875 ex
British Railways WADDON
ex Southern Railways WADDON
ex L.B. & S.C, Ry, #54
#60010 4-6-0 L.N,E.R, 1938 ex
British Railways
DOllINION OF CANADA
ex L.N,E.R. #4438
#030C841
0-6-0 Soc, (1883) ex
S.N.C.F. Alsacienne
ex C. de F. de lEtat
CRM ST -MALO.
#15824 Bo-B CNR/Ottawa Car ex
CNR #15824 1926
* Horrisburg The St. Lawrence Seaway
Museum (Aultsville Station)
#88 2-6-0 CLC 1910 ex
CNR #910
* Kingston City of Kingston
Jr. Chamber of Commerce
ex GTR #1008
#1095 4-6-0 CLC
1913 ex
CPR #1095
* Ottawa
* Ottavla
* Ottawa
* Ottm.,a
* OttaY!a
* Ottawa
* Ottawa
CANADIAN 106 R A I L
Huseum of SCience & Technology
l1useum of Science & lechnology
Huseum of Science & lechnology
11useum of Science & Iechnology
iluseum of Science & Technology
l1useum of Sdence & Iechnology
Museum of Science & lechnology
Huseurn of Science & ~iechnology
#40 4-4-0 Portland
ex GIR
ex Atlantic & St.
Lawrence
11247 0-6-01
11713 2-6-0 GTR
1900
ex CNR f/713
ex GTR 111396, 922
#5700 4-6-4 MLII
1930
ex CNH #5700
ex CNR #5703 (1962)
116200 4-8-4 t111;J
1942
ex CNR 116200
#6400 4-8·4 NL~v
1936
ex CNR 116
i
l00
#926
4-6-0 CPR
1911
ex epg #926
ex CPR 112726
#1201 4-6-2 CPR
1944
ex ePR #1201
Zwick Centennial park -one of BeUevilles major projects for 1967
and now one ol the finest recreation areas In Eastern Ontario -olso
boasts Steamer 2534, a 2-8-0 Consolidation-type Main Line freight loromotive built in 1906 and loaned by The Canadian National Roil­ways, Wilson Concrete Products Ltd. contributed their services
In
moving the 135-too loco and tender 3,000 Ieet from tbe end of tbe railroad frack to its resting place
in the park.
* Ottawa
* Ottawa
* Gananoque
* Belleville
* Haliburton
* Langstaff
CANADIAN
107
l1useum of Science & :I:echnology
Museum of Science & Technology
TOvm of Gananoque
City of Belleville
Kiwanis Club of Haliburton
(Highways 121 & 519)
Government of Ontario
* Palmerston Town of Palmerston
o Toronto Ontario Govt. Science I1useum
o Toronto Ontario Govt. Science Huseum
o Toronto Ontario Gov t. Science ;luseur.1
o loronto Ontario Govt. Science Huseum
o Toronto Ontario Govt. Science !1useum
* Toronto Ci ty of Toronto
(C.N. Exhibition Grounds)
R A I L
#3100 4-8-4 CPR
1928
ex CPR #3100
#2858
4-6-4 I1LH
1938
ex CPR #2858
#500 B-B Oshawa
Ry. 14
ex T.I. Ry. #500
ex O. Ry. #42
#2534
2-8-0 MLW
1906
ex CNR #2534
ex GTR #670
#2616
2-8-0 ALCO
1911
ex CNR #2616
ex GTR #767
#91
2-6-0 CLC
1910
ex CNR #91
ex CNoR #915
ex GTR #1013
#81 2.:.6-0
CLC
1910
ex CNR #81
ex CNoR 11903
ex GTR #1001
#1057
4-6-0 HLH
1912
ex C?R #1057
#2839
4-6-4 HLW
1937
ex CPR #2839
115361 2-8-2 CLC
1926
ex CPR /15361
#1521 4-6-0 MLlv
1905
ex CNR #1521, 1274
ex CNoR #1274, 213
#5107 4-6-2-HLVl
1919
ex CNR #5107
#6213
4-8-4 MLW
1942
ex CNR #6213
o Toronto
o Toronto
* Barrie
* GUelph
* Kitchener
* Hamilton
* London
o London
* Windsor
o Windsor
* St. Thomas
* Goderich
CANADIAN 108
Canadian National Railways
(Operating periodically)
York Locomotive Society
Bolton, Onto
Centennial Park
City of Barrie
City of Guelph
City of Kitchener
Doon Pioneer Village
City of Hamilton
Gage Park
City of London
Exhioition Grounds
VlI. P. Broadbear
Ci ty of Windsor
Essex Terminal Railway (Held
by E.T. Ry).
Pinafore Park Hailway,
p. Broadbear, London, Onto
Huron County
Pioneer Mus.
R A I L
#6218 4-8-4 MLW
1942
#136 4-4-0 Rogers
ex CPR #136 1883
#7136, 196,
#140
#1531 4-6-0 HIM
1910 ex
CNR #1531, 1322
ex CNoR #1322, 261
#6167 4-8-4 MLW
1940 ex
CNR #6167
#894 4-6-0 CPR
1910 ex
CPR #894, 2694
#103
2-8-0 lvlLW
1910 ex
TH&B #103, 72,
52
#86 2-6-0 CLC
1910 ex
CNR #86, 908 ex
GTR #1006
#1 (2nd) 0-4-0ST
HW 1926 ex
H&LofB #1
ex Can. Gypsum Co.
#5 (1948)
#5588 4-6-2 GTR
1911 ex
CNR 115588
ex GTR #213
#9 0-6-0 1m. 1923
#2 (2nd) 0-4-OST
fWd 1926
ex H&L of B #2
ex Can. Gypsum Co.
#7 (1948)
#6275 0-6-0 C!JR
1913 ex
C?R #6275
CANADIAN
109
* North Bay City of North Bay
o Englehart Temiskaming & Northern
Ontar io Railway
* Englehart Ontario Northland Railway
* Chapleau 10vTn of Chapleau
* Capreol Canadian National Railways
for the City of Capreol
* fiainy River Town of Rainy River
* 8arnia Bayview Park,
Point Edward, Onto
R A I L
#503 2-8-0 CLC
1930
ex ONR #503
ex T&NO 11503,. 544 144
#137 2-8-0 CLC
1913
ex CNR #2164 (1966)
#701 4-6-2 CLC
1921 ex
T&NO #701~ 758 1:;8
#5433 2-8-2 CLC
1943
ex CPR #5433
#6077 4-8-2 111I-!
1944
ex CNR 116077
#4008 2-10-2 ALCO
1916
ex CNR #4008
ex COR #2008
#6069 4-8-2 MLltI
1944
ex CNR #6069
Western Canadas preserved locomotives next month.
BELOW: C.N.H. # 6167 preserved by the city of Guelph
Ontario, safely behind a six foot chain link fence.
BY DEREK BOOTH
& F.A. KEMP
C,QNADIAN NATIlJNAL RAILWAYS has given notice
that,effective 28 April 1968,it intends to
discontinue operation of passenger Trains
620,623,624,625 and 626,between Montreal,
Que.,Sherbrooke and Coaticook,Que.
Moreover,CN will provide taxi service on week days between Sher­
brOOke and Coaticook,for the benefit of passengers to the latter
city. Fridays and Sundays,proper train service would be operated.
This would,in effect,reduce the Montreal-Sherbrooke service from
three trains daily,to one. Presumably,the connecting Richmond
Quebec
service would also be reduced. All of this depends on wh­
ether the Railway Transport Committee at Ottawa determines that
these trains do constitute a passenger service within the mean­
ing of the law. If the Committe8 does not 50 determine within 45
days,then theee CN trains may be withdrawn.
THE NEW YORK CENTRAL SYSTEM AND THE PENNSYLVANIA
Railroad,having been given the authority to amalgamate recently,one
of the conditions of the decision of the United States Interstate
Commerce Commission was that the insatiatable Norfolk and Western
should Qobble up the Erie-Lackawanna the Boston & t~aine and the
Delaware-& Hudson Railroads.(That leaves only the Maine Central and
the Bangor & Aroostook -theuninvited~)The inclusion of the D. &H.
i~ the deal might cast a cloud on the present passenger service
from Montreal to New York,as it is no secret that N. & W.management
pelicy is diametrically opposed to passenger service,in any manner
or form. This is also in significant contrast to F.C.Dumaine,jr.s
recent upgrading of passenger equipment. There is,nevertheless , a
further hurdle to be negotiated. The proposed merger must still be
approved by the shareholders of the various railways concerned be­
fore it can be implemented.
ANOTHER REDEVELOPMENT SCHEME ! CPR AND CNR have an­
nounced plans for a develop~ent of the Toronto area between Front
Street and the Gardiner Expressway. This space is presently occup­
ied by Toronto Union Station and approaches,Federal Post Office
Terminal A,Canadian Pacifics John Street coach yard,piggyback tr­
acks and engine house,Canadian Nationals Spadina roundhouse and
coach yard,Bathurst Yard,Low Level Yard and CN and CP office buil­
dings,among other things! Moreover,a loop line skirts the area,ad­
jacent to the Expressway. Redevelopment designs include a totally
new station and possibly a general terminal for all public trans­
portation,as well as office buildings and shopping plazas and
malls. It is expected that the cost of this scheme would be in ex­
cess of ONE BILLION dollars! That is the figu~e 1,followed by
NINE ZEROS! What a way to begin or end a trip !
CANADIAN
111
R A I L
COOL IT,MAN r THATS WHAT MONTREAL is trying to
do to METRO I A contract has been awarded for 1,488 ventil­
ating fans and air intakes to be installed in the 369 cars of
the rubber-tired subway,which has suffered from overheating or
undercooling ever since its opening in 1966. Four suppliers of
ventilating equipment submitted bids and prototype models of
each product were installed in several of the cars,for testing.
The cars used in the tests had glass replaced in all the screen­
ed windows,except in one end-window. During the summer of 1967,
screens replaced glass in two doors of every car,and end -door
glasses were also removed~ The proposed air intakes are mount­
ed above the fan louvers (originally intended as exhaust vents)
and cars so equipped are easily identified. There is some wind
noise inside the cars,between stations,and the air drag would
appear to be considerable. The fans seem to work, but getting
the cooler air into the tunnels poses another and much more
costly problem. To solve (or to try to solve) this dilemma, two
new ventilation shafts are to be sunk and additional equipment
provided-to draw in more (and cooler) air from the surface.Ev­
entually,there are to be ten such shafts at various points on
the syatem. Thus,METRO proposes to reduce the present excessive
temperatures in the tunnels~by adding more (and cooler) air for
the trains to move back and forth,together with the passengers I
The effectiveness of this proposal seems rather questionable,in
view of the fact that in July and August,above-ground tempera­
tures often exceed 90
0
F.This would indeed add future insult to
present injury r
EXPO EXPRESS TO MAN AND HIS WORLD ? The contin­
uing exhibition of Montreals Mayor Jean Drapeau on the site of
EXPO 67 is to be opened by the City of Montreal on May 17,1968,
under the title Man and His World. Previously,it was announ­
ced that the closing date for tenders on the EXPO-Express equip­
ment had been advanced to 4 September 1968. It has been propo­
eed that the highly successful transit system continue in oper-­
ation in 1968,and when such factors as purchase price and remov­
al are considered, this will probably come to pass. The aluminum
cars are presently stored at Canadian Pacifics Angus Shops and
the terminal sheds,track and signals are still in situ on the
EXPO site.
CANADIAN NATIONALS MULTIPLE UNIT CARS,in constant
service in the Montreal-Gartierville-Deux Montagnes suburban ser­
vice,are at last being repainted in the black-and-white color co-­
mbination,and the overhaul of theee cars has neceesitated the re­
appearance of the electric locomotives -the femous box cabs -on
week
ends. Normally,these unique locomotives are used only at rush
hours,Monday to Friday. The MU cars were among the last vehicles
to be painted in the green, gold and black CN colour scheme.
What dyou eay, Henry, do we gambJe on a return ticket … ?
CANADIAN RAIL
published monthly (exoept July & August oombined)
by the publioations oommittee
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION ~~~,~:/24u!tQon 8
Assooiate Membership inoluding ~~ issues of
Canadian Rail 8.00 annually.
EDITOR S.VTorthen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Beatty & F.F.Angus
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP AND BRANCHES
Hr. J.A.Beatty. 4982 Queen ~lary Hoad, Montreal 29, Quebec, Canada.
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA Maj. S.H.Elllot, Secty., P.O.Bo.X )52, Term1nal A Ottawa Onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN V.H.Coley, Secty., 1124) -72nd Ave .. , Edmonton, Alberta
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY K.F.Ch1vers. Apt. ), 67 Somerset st. W •• Ottawa, Ontario.
SASKATCHEWAN J .S.N1cholson, 2306 Arnold st •• Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
PACIFIC COAST Peter Cox, 2936 West 28th Ave Vancouver, Bri t1sh Columb1a
FAR EAST W.D.NcKeown. Oasks (Tosabor1) YMCA, 2-chome, N1sh1-ku,Osaka,Japan.
BRITISH ISLES J .H.Sanders. 67 Wlllow Way. Ampthlll. Beds. England.
MANITOBA K,G.Younger 267 Vernon Road. Winnipeg, Nanitoba.
Copyrlght 1968 pr1nted 1n Canada
on Canad1an paper

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