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Canadian Rail 195 1968

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Canadian Rail 195 1968

No.195 January 1968
Delaware and Hudson class U-OPA-l locomotive, with train No.)4 the
Laurentian departing Montreal West Station, bound for Albany and
New York City on January 1, 1968.
Above: W.So& L.W. car # 12 turning out of the Winnipeg North
End Station. as the scene looked during the lines heyday in
19180 A maroon and cream colour scheme was used at that timeo
Selkirk car # 16 approaching Winnipeg in 1919. Compare with
photo of No. 16 after conversion to one man operation • page 7
Lowerll Sweeper # 1 in front of the Selkirk barn, 1915.
Borrowed city car # 664 is in the background. Note arch doors.
WINNIPEG
A
LIGHT-WEIGHT beside-the-road affair, operated by an old 4-4-0,
was the Winnipeg areas first taste of an interurban line. It
ran between the budding metropolis and the satelite town of
Selkirk, twenty three miles to the North, and had been built to
provide the inhabitants of Winnipegs northern suburbs with better
transportation than the Canadian Paoifio Railway was then prepared
to offer.
Winnipeg, a trading post well before the start of the 19th
Century, beoame one of the most important oommunities chiefly be­
oause of its looation at the junction of two important water trade
routes –the Red and the Assiniboine Rivers. Winnipeg as a City
grew from that situation. When settlemsnt first opened up in the
surrounding areas, a river-lot survey was used, oreating a land
pattern somewhat similar to ~t established in the habitant settle­
ments of Quebec. This led to a oonsiderable density of population
along the rivers. When inland trails and roads were laid out,
they followed fairly closely the river pattern, and other settle­
ments came into being —again along the rivers.
By 1882, Winnipeg had built up a density of population suffi­
oient to warrant publio transportation by rail, and the first horse
Car line-Was established, followed by eleotrio cars a decade later.
Around 1900, the population was some 52,000, with satelite towns
growing in proportion.
TO THE NORTH
The town of Selkirk, twenty-three miles north along the Red
River, was one of the more ambitious of these suburban communities.
A branoh of the C.P.R. had been construoted through Selkirk in the
mid 1880s, but the townspeople were dissatisfied with the service
provided and oraved a better link with Winnipeg.
Plans eventually took shape in 1903 in the form of a light,
steam railwaY. This was a beside-the-road affair with many lit­
tle stops along the way. The first power was provided by an old
Pennsylvania-built 4-4-0 and a Forney or el type 0-4-4, whioh
bore the number 131. Whether owned simultaneously, or one follow­
ing the other is not known, but the writer remembers photographing
the ex-Pennsy. engine in a rather dilapidated oondition at the Win­
nipeg Eleotric South Yard in 1915. For Passenger equipment, they
had three old interurban-type combination cars aoquired from tte
Toronto area, while for freight a small stook of second-hand box and
flat oars was used. This whole set-up was called the Winnipeg
Selkirk and Lake Winnipeg Railway, denoting ambi tions for building
to the beaches of Lake Winnipeg —a soheme, alas, that Was never
fulfilledl
CANADIAN 4-R A I L
By 1908 the system was electrified and brought under the con­
trol of the Winnipeg Electric Railway system. A substantial briok
car barn and station building was erected at Selkirk and it was
here that operations centred and running repairs made. Crews and shop-men
were mainly Selkirk people. A turn-around was estah­
lished at the North Main Barns in Winnipeg, along with two inter­
mediate sub-stations. The interurban cars oame into mid-town Win­
nipeg for only a short time –about one year –1926 –but often
passed through the city for overhaul and Paint jobs at Winnipegs
South Barn Shops.
Rolling stock for ~ electrified interurban line Was built new
at the South Barn Shops. There were twelve passenger cars —six
motored and six trailers. Of the motored oars, three were combin­
ation cars and three for passengers only. All were of wooden con­
struction and mounted on Baldwin type trucks. They had end doors
for inter-oommunication between oars, but were not equipped for MU
operation.
These Selkirk cars were quite smart appearing when new, the
later ones in the group being built with arch windows with ~ usual
coloured glass in the arch. They went through several paint
schemes and modifications, the final Paint job being similar to that
on Winnipeg Electric Railway cars —pumpkin yellow, cream trim,
with black trucks and underparts. Some had grey roofs, others
aluminum-ooloured. Selkirk cars had their own even number system,
#2 to #24. During the latter years of the lines operation, the
motor units were equipped for one-man operation the trailers
sat unused for years.
There was also an old sweeper acquired from the Winnipeg Elec­
trio Railway, and later a rotary plough was bought to serve all the
interurban lines. A box-type freight motor and a small fleet of
box and flat Cars taken over from the steam road served the freight
traffio requirements of the line. About 1930, one of the Passen­
ger cars, #14, was badly smashed up in a collision and WaS rebuil t
into a general purpose car. It was re-numbered, strangely enough,
#3100.
Af~er the steel rolling mill at Selkirk came into prodUction,
a shuttle service was run on Eveline Street to acoommodate the mill
workers. A oar, borrowed from the Winnipeg system, was used for
this duty.
The Selkirk Line followed the vicissitudes of the area and
during the 1930s suffered the decline in bUsiness common to all
transit systems in that era. Operqtion as a rail servioe ended on
August 31st, 1937: rails were removed north of Mlddleohurch during
the following year.
During the period while the WS!LW Was at its peak, however,
a spurt in interurban and suburban railway building saw the oon­
struotion of a branch from near Middleohuroh northwesterly to Stony
MOuntain and Stonewall —about 20 miles. These were old towns;
Stony Mountain being the site of the Federal Penitentiary tor the
area and Stonewall a prosperous agrioultural oentre. Also, due to
limestone outcroppings, there WaS considerable quarrying at both
places.
CANADIAN
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WINNIPEQ INT£RURBAN.5
CIRCA. /.930
CANADIAN 6 R A I L
Very little was spent on struotures for this branoh line. A
small sta tion and an eleotrical sub-station at the Mountain and a
single-stall wooden shed on the end of the wye at stonewall suf­
fioed. Statton and offioe were in an old rented stone hoUse whioh
still stands. Servioe on the line was limited to half a dozen
trips per day using one car. As this was a branch of the WS & LW
rolling stook wae furnished by the parent road. Due to extremely
poor maintenanoe on this branoh, the road-bed eventually beoame so
bad that for a while the heavy interurbans oould not operate, and a
little Fairbanks gas-car was acquired from Winnipeg Hydro to pro­
vide the required service. There was so much complaining from the
publio, however, that the management finally had to improve the
line and restore the electrio cars again until the end.
Rail operations on this line, while never prosperous, outlasted
those on the Selkirk line by almost two years, ending in the spring
of 1939.
TO THE WEST
While the early development of the W.S.& L.W. was going on to
the north of Winnipeg, there was a need found for extended service
towards the west. This was accomplished by the construction of a
line along Portage Avenue to Headingley, a village some 12 miles
west of Winnipeg along the Assiniboine River. This line Was built
as far as st. Charles in 1903, taken over by the Winnipeg Eleotrio
Railway in 1905, and extended to Headingley the same year.
Two cars were built in W.E.Ry. shops for this service. They were
combination cars, and were equipped with Brill trucks and spe­
oial gearing for high-speed operation. They were big, easy-riding
cars, and provided hourly service between Headingley and the C.P.R.
Station loop in downtown Winnipeg. Although double-ended, they
were rarely operated that way.
Rail service to Headingley was discontinued in 1930 but as the
line was an extension of the Portage Avenue route, a very busy city
line to the western section of the oity, abandonment was done on a
out-baok basis between 1930 and 1955 when Winnipegts electrio rail
servioe was discontinued altogether.
Belowl Cars 6 & 22 about to leave stonewall for Winnipeg in 1920.
Streetcars like this once~~i;dWi;nipe9·
gers to see the Maroons play at River Park, or to
family picnics at Elm Park.
One of Winnipegs open cars used during the early years of the
Century, Mr. Harris points out that there never was much use
made of the open cars on the Selkirk, or stonewall lines, About
the only suburban running was occasionally to st. Charles. But
we are including the illustration of one of these W.E,Ry. fresh
air trams that once carried Winnipeggers to the citys outlying
parks. Photo from the Winnipeg Free Press.
BELOW I W.S.& L.W. No. 16 at stonewall Manitoba, in October
1935. Motorman was Mr. R.Styles, father of stan F.Styles who
provided this photograph of the Manitoba interurban after its
conversion to one man operation.
CANADIAN 8 R A I L
TO THE SOUTH
Durin~ the 1913-1914 period, an electric railway line was also
constructed south of the Provincial Capital to serve the newly­
erected A~icul tural Colle~e, some ei~ht miles south of the city.
(This Colle~e pioneered the si te now occupied by the University of
Manitoba.) The line was a middle-of-the-road railway, on what is
now Pembina Hi~hway. Stran~ely, it was not an extension of the
existin~ city car line -Pembina -but ran from the old Park Line
Loop at Jubilee Avenue. This avoided a very busy level crossin~ of
the C.N.R. main lines to the south and to the west.
An hourly service was provided on the Colle~e line to down­town Winnipeg.
Two standard single-end ten-windowed city cars
numbered 51B and 520 were allotted to the run. The only change
made to these assigned cars was the hanging of the big carbon
headlights.
There was no substation on the line and at times barely enough
power was
available to move the cars at the end of the line. This
was especially noticeable on Saturday afternoons when traffic was
heavy and trailers were used.
At the time the College line was built, or very shortly there­
after, the village of St.Norbert was also served by a continuation
south on Pembina. One old 9-windowed double-ender, number 184,
did this stint. The only changes made in this case were the appli­
cation of a flanger device for winter and the use of a coal stove in
the middle of one side, a most welcome addition during the cold wea­
ther months. This car was rebuilt as a work car after service to
St.Norbert ended, and in this form lasted to the end of W.E.Ry. op­
erations in 1955. The St.Norbert run was a shuttle service oper­
ating from the College Junction. Cars ceased running to St.Norbert
in 1933 and to the U in 1944.
For
the sake of the record, there were several other lines of
the Winnipeg transit system which would come under the heading of
suburban or special service lines. The one to Charleswood, eight
miles west of the City on the south side of the Assiniboine River
is well worth mentioning. This was a beside-the-road operation
built in 1907 and abandoned in 1935. For the most part, 4-wheeled double ended, 7-windowed
dinkeys were used on an hourly schedule,
crossing south on the C.N.R. bridge at St.James. For a few years
during and after World War I, there existed a line running at right
angles across the prairie north from the Headingley line, the sole
purpose of which was to serve the Rifle Range where both soldiers
and civilians practiced gunnery on regularly assigned schedules.
Also, for the record, it should not go without mention that there
was a
nearly interurban to Transcona, eight miles due east of
Winnipeg, where in 1912 the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway had con­
structed their main shops. 1!ro circumstances, however, voided this
planned line. The G.T.P. provided a regular shuttle service for
their workers, and the construction of one of the Wests first con­
crete slab highways made road travel that much more easy. Winnipeg
Electric had planned to build an interurban to Transcona in 1914,
but the outbreak of war forced cancellation of the p2ns, and the
whole scheme fell through –never to be carried out.
This nineteenth issue of Power marks a change in author due
to the fact that the founder of the column has had to devote more
time to personal affairs. However, the tradition of Power shall
be carried on under the same flagstaff -that of the noble Budd Company RDC.
Power is an approximately monthly column devoted to news of
motive powe~ o~erating on Canadian railways and subsidiaries
thereof, plus export models of Canadian builders, from the time
that the locomotive is con~eived until the time that it is scrap­
ped. The author would like to thank the many persons who contrib­
ute to Power, especially the Montreal Locomotive Works, whose in­
teresting research it 1s hoped will form the basis of a feature
article later in the year. The CNR is also very kind. Anyone who
sends information or photographs will be given credit if the in­
formation or photo is used unless the person specifically reguests
that his name be withheld.
Please note that when the abbreviated form of the
used, the order of the numbers indicates day/month/year.
ample, 01/02/68 means 01 February 1968, NOT, we repeat
January 1968 •

,. .. .
, .
. .
IN
~ …
Purchases: up to 10 January 1968.
Two Burro cranes
from ~oodings Canada
Road numbers 50411 and
cranes is 12i tons.
built to Modification 40 have been
Ltd. for delivery between 12/67 and
50412 have been assigned. Capacity
date
For
NOT,
is
ex-
02
ordered
02/68.
of the
Althoue;h CN was originally goine;
tion motors on their second order of
celled and all units are to be new.
to trade in 26 sets of trac­
c-6JOs, this has been can-
Deliveries: up to JO November 1967.
Six more GR-JOds have been received from GMD for the Moun­
tain Region as follows. It is of interest to note that 5008 up­
wards are not equipped with dynamic brakes.
5012, 501J on 11 November 1967.
5014, 5015 on 17 November 1967.
5016, 5017 on 25 November 1967.
The locomotives for the Indian ·State Railways are shown in these two
photographs. 6197 is on shop trucks and does not have its coupler,
pilot, or headlight installed. 6169 is shown being loaded onto the
City of Singapore. The locomotive is coated in white foam (known as
a cocoon) to proteot the body and paint from corrosion during ship­
ment. The units are painted maroon with deep yellOw trim. The loco­
motives are rather low-slung and extremely handsome when mounted
cOrrectly on their trucks. An interesting note on these units is
their cab floor which is about six inches lower than the running
board of the locomotive. Anyone entering the unit must duck through
the door, but has full headroom once inside. (Photos courtesy M.L.W.)
CANADIAN 11
R A I L
Retirements: up to 30 November 1967.
ROAD NUl1BER SERIAL BUILDER BUILT REIIRED
1605 2658 CLC 17/12/51 30/11/67
1609 2662 CLC 10/01/52 30/11/67
3019 81014 MLW 25/08/54 30/11/67
3020 81015 11LH 30/08/54 30/11/67
3033 81028 MLH 07/10/54 30/11/67
3034 81029 IJLW
07/
10
/5
4 30/11/67
3221 M-3444-16 ~lLW 26/08/66 01/11/67
369
1
.j. 82236 MLW 1958 01/11/67
4810 A-544 GMD
1953 01/11/67
6522 A-1052 GMD 22/03/57 01/11/67
9314 2649 CLC 18/12/52 17/11/67
9435 77725
MLW 28/02/52 30/11/67
In addition, the majority of the remaining 1600s have been
stored serviceable for the winter. It is interesting to specu­
late on just how many of these units will see service again. One
is inclined to wis~ that CN would scrap the lot now and clean up
their roster which is resembling a Swiss Cheese more closely every
day.
The following note has been received from D.H. McQueen in
London: Its old home week for CLC diesel units in London, Ont­
ario. A survey today (26 November 1967) showed 28 units either on
their way to, or already in
4
the CNRs Reclamation Yard. As well,
Oshawa Railway locomotives 00, 401, 402, and 403 are rusting a­
way. At London East were: 2202(n):2203(n):2204(n):2206:2209:2210:
2211:2212:2214(n):9302:9316. At Reclamation were: 2205(n):2207:
2213 (n):2215 (n):2216 (n):2217 (n):9300:9301:9304:9305:9306:9308:
9318(n):9320:9328:9338:9342. (n) indicates units are in CNs new
image colour scheme. In addition, it is noted that 2203:2209:2214
all show signs of extensive fire, while 2213 appears to have been
sideswiped or turned over. The only unit to disappear in London
has been 9303. Work is now proceeding on 9318 and 9320.
At 20:30 on 15 December 1967 CN units 9062 and 9041, west­
bound and unmanned, struck units 9122:4219:4814 on an extra east
at M.P. 8.5 of the Yale Subdivision at 42 miles per hour in a tun­
nel. The extra east was just starting up from an intermediate
red block and had gone only four car lengths. Both leading A
units were flattened up to the centre of the cab, roughly to
where the heavy steel frame bar passes around the walls and over
the ceiling. The other three units suffered only superficial dam­
age, although all locomotives were derailed. It is estimated that
the two lead units will be scrapped.
Sales: up to 27 December 1967.
Mr. C.F. Jones advises us that CN 5 and CN 6 are presently
held in Edmonton pending the appearance of a buyer.
Locomotive Transfers: up to 30 November 1967.
ROAD NUMBERS
1036
1037
TRANSFERRED FROI1
Mountain Rgn.
Mountain Rgn.
TRANSFERRED TO
A tlant ic Rgn.
St. Lawrence Rgn.
DATE
10/11/67
10/11/67
CANADIAN 12 R A I L
ROAD NUMBERS TRANSFERRED FROM TRANSFERRED TO DATE
1039 St. Lawrence Rgn. Atlantic Rgn. 10/11/67
1248 to 1249 Prairie Neebing Prairie Symington 06/11/67
1257 to 1258 Prairie Neebing Prairie Symington 06/11/67
1273 to 1274 Prairie Neebing Prairie Symington 06/11/67
1281 Prairie Neebing Prairie Symington 06/11/67
1328 to 1337 Prairie Rgn. Atlantic Rgn. 10/11/67
1370 to 1376 Prairie Rgn. Mountain Rgn. 06/11/67
4284 Mountain Rgn. St. Lawrence Rgn. 03/11/67
4285 to 4287 Mounta in Rgn. Prairie Rgn. 13/11/67
D110 Great Lakes Rgn. Mountain Rgn. 03/11/67
D203 Mountain Rgn. St. Lawrence Rgn. 08/11/67
~liscellaneous: up to 10 January 1968.
1) More news from Clayton Jones informs us that CN 4352 is receiv­
ing the same treatment as that outlined for CN 4341 in CR #194.
2) A note from Robert Arnold tells us some of the new features
that have been embodied in MLWs C-630s on the CN. The most
important by far is the new high-adhesion truck developed
jointly by MLW and Dofasco. Other items include Cobra brake
shoes, an air starter, and an alternator replacing the main
generator.
DELAWARE & HUDSON
Purchases: up to 10 January 1968.
D&H has purchased four PA-1 locomotives from the ATSF for use
in Montre~l passenger service. They arrived at Colonie Shops on 16 December
1967. They are numbered 16 to 19 and have their 2000
horsepower Alco primernover intact.
*This unit also carries
ATSF NO. D&H NO. SERIAL BUILT plate 76094 from ATSF B
unit 73A (03/48) and
59L 16 76535 10/48 plate 75337 from ATSF B 60L 17 765
4
7
11/48 unit 53A (04/47).
62L 18 765 1* 12/48 Pormerly 54B. Renum-66L**
19 75318 05/47 bered May 1949.
LONDON AND PORT STANLEY
Donations: up to 10 January 1968.
Six pieces of LPS equipment as listed below were turned over
to the National Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa at Lon­
don on 19 October 1967.
Flanger Auxiliary
Snow Plow
Locomotive
LPS FA 1
LPS SP 1
LPS L 1
Caboose
Line Car
Hopper
LPS C 2
LPS 451
LPS 106

Indian State Railways: up to 10 January 1968.
The last of these locomotives has been outshopped and shipped
as shown below. ~e are indebted to f10ntreal Shipping Ltd. and
MacLean-Kennedy for their assistance with the compilation of the
statistics for this entire order of )2 locomotives.
ROAD DATE SHIP DATE DESTIN-
NUMBER OUTSHOPPED SAILED ATION
6185 06/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Madras
6186 06/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Madras
6187 06/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Nadras
6188 06/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Madras
6189 06/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Madras
6190 06/12/67 Jalakanta 08/12/67 Bombay 6191
05/12/67 Jalakanta 08/12/67 Calcutta
6192 06/12/67 Jalakanta 08/12/67 Calcutta
619a
06/12/67 Jalakanta 08/12/67 Calcutta
619 07/12/67 City of Wellington 12/12/67 Bombay
6195 18/12/67 Jalakendra 21/12/67 Bombay
6196 18/12/67 Jalakendra 21/12/67 Bombay 6197
19/12/67 Jalakendra 21/12/67 Bombay 6198
19/12/67 Jalakendra 21/12/67 Bombay
International Nickel Comoany: up to 10 January 1968.
The International Nickel Company has ordered three DL-718B1s
for use in Thompson, Manitoba. Delivery is expected in the sec­
ond quarter of 1968.
QUEBEC, NORTH SHORE, AND LABRADOR RAILWAY
Purchases: up to 10 January 1968.
The QNSL announced that they have ordered six SD40s from
SMD in London, Delivery is scheduled for July of this year.
MISCELLANEOUS
1) Mr. W.L. Hay sends the follOWing item showing that those BLE1s
and DMI I S certainly do get around. Business has been so brisk
on the PRR that there has been a serious shortage of power.
Surplus motive power has been leased from a number of other
roads. Main line PRR trainsare now being operated with loco­
motives from the Burlington, Union Pacific, Norfolk and vJest­
ern, Bangor and Aroostook, Bessemer and Lake Erie, Duluth, Mis­
sab1, and Iron Range plus even a few New York Central units.
Fifty locomot1ves have been leased from N&W alone.
CANADIAN 15 R A I L
ERRATUM
1) Oh woe is us! There is an error in CR #192s erratum #3. This
item states that CR issue #190 was switching in Cornerbrook
Yard, something that assuredly did not OCCur. It should read:
#920 was performing the sWitching duties.
2) CR #192 gives the bUilders date of CN 9448 on page 212 as
17/03/67. This should, of course, read 17/03/53.
1 3) Mr. Andrew Bell draws our attention to the fact that the Oba
Subdivision (Hornepayne to Folyet) has been combined with the
old Ruel Subdivision (Foiyet to Capreol) to form one large Ruel
Subdivision (Hornepayne to Capreol). The Oba Subdivision was
referred to on page 212 of CR #192.
4) Your Power editor draws your attention to the fact that the
photograph of Indian Railways 6130, which was inserted in CR
#194 unbeknownst to said editor, does not portray a locomotive
that entirely resembles the locomotives of the order just fin­
ished delivery. Correct photos are in this issue.
PHOTOS ••• Page 13. Due to the delay in delivery of the self
propelled cars, GO borrowed locomotives and cars from ONR with which
to inaugurate its new timetable on 05 September 1967. Temporary jump­
ers were installed to allow the diesels on each end of the train to
operate in multiple. The photos by Robert R. Clark show train 967 at
Oakville on the first day of the new timetable.
THE ASSOCIATION HAS RECENTLY RECEIVED the following don­
ations to the Canadian Railway Museum: from the Canadian Pacific
Railway,the 12-section,1 drawing room sleeping car Neville,and the
10-roomette 5 double-bedroom sleeping car Brookdale,-once in the
consist of the NYCs Twentieth Century Limited.
The Napierville Junction Railway has donated its caboose no. 34 and
Mrs.
T.F.Hamlet of Montreal has given us en operating scale model
(3/4 inch to the foot) of a New York Central Railroad Hudson class
steam locomotive.
From California,ws have received a complete set of Canadian Railway
end Marine World from 1898 to 1960,-Six (6) boxss weighing 467
pounds. This magnificent colI action was acquired through the efforts
of Mr. Fred Angus.

CANADIAN RAILWAY
MUSEUM
1967 our Jrnl.useum grows
Herewith an illustrated account of the dramatic progress made
during the year 1967 by the energetic members at our Museum:
The Canadian Railway Museum -Musee Ferroviaire Canadien, at
Delson/St-Constant, Que. In a word, the year 1967 was one of
the best ever!
BUILDINGS and STRUCTURES:
Our second exhibit building, measuring 335 ft. by 80 ft., is
now ready for roof and siding. Its foundations were built
wi th financial assistance from many of our members and friends,
the Foundation Fund appeal of two years ago. The steel for the
frame was supplied by Algoma Steel, Ltd., and Truscon DiVision,
DOHTAR Industries Limited. It is of the COR-TEN type and was
fabricated and erected by Dominion Bridge Company, Ltd. in May.
COR-TEN steel is a unique type which is designed to be exposed
to the yleather and rust (oxidize). Once a coating of oxidized
surface has been formed, it will remain in that state without
further deterioration. What is more important is that it does
not require painting or other surface maintenance.
Each bay of the new building is designed to admit three tracks.
Your fellow members layed three tracks in the north bay this
summer -simultaneously setting a new Museum record for track
laying in one working day.
The connection to the main cross-over track was made subsequently.
While all three tracks in each bay will be used to accommodate
restored eXhibits, the equipment on the middle track can be
pulled out of the building during our summer exhibition season.
This will enable photographs to be taken. At the same time,
this middle track will be ballasted up to rail level inside the
building, so that our visitors can view and photograph exhibits
on the two outer tracks without difficulty. The illustrations
accompanying this article testify as to the quality of the
track-work, which is now a hallmark of the Museum. We should be
very proud of the excellent job which our enthusiastic work
crews have done.
Rails and ties are on hand for construction of the remaining
three tracks in the south bay. These storage tracks will be
connected to the main lead by means of a fascinating three-way
stub switch – a remarkable relic from the now defunct Maritime
Railway (former home of exhibit Mar i time Railway No. 5 now at
the Museum), which was torn up in 1961. When the new bUilding
is complete, it will provide shelter and display for ALL of the
steam engines at the Museum and will subsequently represent the
largest collection of restored steam locomotives, under cover,
anywhere in the world~ And if this sounds like a terrible brag,
just reread the statement!
CANADIAN 18 R A I L
Barrington Station, the 1885 Canada Atlantic Railway station, on
the Museum property, was partially opened for the first time
this summer. A new B.C. cedar shingle roof was completed,
several layers of old paint were scraped from the waiting room
walls and a new ceiling was built. In the interval before re­
decoration of the waiting room, a large display of railway pic­
tures and other archival material was installed. This restora­
tion and exhibition drew very favourable comment from our
visitors. Paint in the precise, original colours used in 1885
is now on hand, thanks to the Sherwin-Williams Company of Canada,
Limited, and the research into their records by one of their
staff. The original station signs are ready for hanging, when
the outside painting is finished. The station (see map) is lo­
cated at the crossing at grade of the main (siding) line and
the proposed tramway belt line, around the Museum. It appears
that Barrington Station will once again be a very busy place,
one day. Still to be constructed at Barrington Station are
such things as an old-time railroad crossing, complete with the
necessary signals, crossing warning signs and old-fashioned
cow-catchers (cattle guards). Adjacent to the station will
be a traffic circulating area and the traditional station
flower-garden. All gardening buffs are welcome to offer sug­
gestions for the beautification of Barrington -and the Museum
in general~
Although our goal of creating a short, operating tramway line
was not realized in full, this sumr(:er, nonetheless a brick sub­
station was constructed. This substation is intended to house
our motor-generator set and associated electrical equipment,
for the tramway line. It has been completed thanks to the very
kind gifts and assistance of Messrs. Cook & Leitch Limited. The
design of the building was intended to capture the flavour of
the suburban tracks ide booster power station, such as might
have been erected by the Montreal Street Railway.. The design
also permitted the inclusion of very necessary public con­
veniences.
ACQUIS IT IONS:
Your Association was uniquely honored this year when British
Railways Board dona ted to the Museum their locomotive number 60010 Dominion
of Canada. The details of this gift were re­
ported in an article in CANADIAN RAIL. The arrival of Dominion
of Canada at the Museum was celebrated by a gala reception at
which Sir Henry Lintott, British High Commissioner in Canada,
officially presented the steam engine to Dr. R. V. V. Nicholls,
our President. The weather was excellent, clear and warm, and a
splendid time was had by all of the invited guests, friends
and members of the Association. Refreshments were served in our
two private cars, C.P.R. No. 38 Saskatchewan and C.P.R •. busi­
ness car No.1. To make the day completely British, the invited
guests were transported to and from the Museum in the London
Transport Corporations double-decker red bus, which was in Mont­
real during EXPO 67 Under the auspices of Brooke-Bond Limited.
The brilliant red of the bus combined with the sophisticated dark
green of Dominion of Canada to provide a very colourfu 1 back­
ground to the presentation ceremony.
ABOVE: Napierville Junction By. caboose # 35.
BELOW I Front view of building No.1
ABOVE: Barrington Station, a view from the rearl
BELOW: Tramway substation building, motor generator set is inside.
CANADIAN
21
R A I L
The Association has received two new passenger vehicles this
summer, donated by the Canadian Pacific Railway. These are two
sleeping cars, named Neville and Brookdale. They represent
two very important stages in the development of the sleeping car.
They are being held by the Canadian Pacific Railway for the As­
sociation.
Another stroke of luck for the Museum was the promise of the
famous Canadian Pacific Railways School car which has had
such an active life in service for the Government of Ontario,
serving northern Ontario communities, too small to have a school
of their own. By a very happy arran8ement, the interior of the
car will remain as it is. The interior of the car waS fitted by
the Government of Ontario and we are to receive desks, black­
boards, chalk and so on, intact. The car, itself, is a fine ex­
ample of a wooden passenger car of the late 1890s. It is truly
a magnificent acquisition for our passenger car collection.
Another welcome offer was received recently by the Association,
from the Napierville Junction Railway, which daily hauls freight
and passengers (D. & H.) past the Museum. Negotiations have been
concluded to acquire one of the very unique cabooses vhich Bring
up the rear of the N.J. freight trains. Thus, we have added yet
another vehicle from a Canadian railway -one th.at has not hither­
to been represented at the Huseum.
OPERATIONS:
This year, your Huseum was open to the public from 28 Apr il to 5
September daily, and thereafter on week-ends until 31 October.
These dates coincided approximately with those of EXPO 67. We
can now report that our third year of operation was a resounding
success. In numbers, our visitors increased by 60% over 1966, to
just over 12,000. In fact, we had one or more visitors from
nearly every country in North America and Europe. Some came from
as far away as New Zealand and South Africa. Among others, was
the driver of Dominion of Canada, who piloted the engine from London
to Newcastle for more than 15 years, between 1938 and 1958.
The supervision and daily operation of the Museum Vas handled
admirably by the five university students hired for the pur-
pose. oJe received many compliments on the exhibits, the
grounds and particularly Barrington Station and its first dis­
play. Many of the visitors became members of the Association
as a result of their visit, Vhich helped the Associations mem­
bership to increase to a new high.
We were also fortunate to complete the restoration of Canadian
Pacific Railway No. 144 with the guidance and hard work of our
member, Mr. Hans Rostock. Although it was our intention to put
this locomotive under steam, the boiler inspeotion requirements
as interpreted by the inspector (plus our lack of a proper main-
tenance facility), resulted in the deferment of this project to
a date in the future.
Reorganization of the restored exhibits in Building No.1 will
provide a different display for 1968 and this reorganization
will enable us to use the entire building to display restored
locomotives and vehicles, thus achieving an objective which has
eluded us for some time.
1. Gzowski Bridge
2. Substation & Public Conveniences
3. Archives/Library Building
4. ~[urntable
5. Water -,!ank
6. Engine Shed & Backshop
7. Stores Building
8. Exhibits Building No.1
9. Office & Section House
10. Exhibits Building No.2
11. Perimeter Tramway Line
12. Barrington Station
13. Connection to C.P.R.
14. Yard for Exhibits Building No.1
15. Yard for Exhibits Building No.2
.-
MUSE E
Complete
Exterior comp18te
On the drawing board
On the drawing board
Projected
Projected
Projected
Interior & exterior com­
plete 1968
Interior & exterior com­
plete 1968
Interior & exterior com­
plete 1968
Part to be completed in
1968
Exterior & part of interior
to be completed
in 1968.
Complete
Complete. To be levelled in
1968
Half built. To be completed
with 3-wab stub
switch in 1968 •
Ferroviaire Canadien
CANADIAN 2J R A I L
The Nuseum Commission is the body which the Board of Directors
has established to build and operate the Museum. With the
variety and number of objectives to be accomplished in 1968,
the Board of Directors has expanded the Commission from seven
to nine members, at the request of the present Commissioners.
The names of the Commissioners will be announced when their
election has been ratified by the Board of Directors shortly
after the Annual General Heeting of the Association in January.
Your fellovr-members who are intimately connected with the opera­
tion of the Canadian Railway Museum -Mus~e Ferroviaire Canadien,
are very conscious of the responsibility which they have assumed.
Since they are generally resident in the Montreal area, it is
quite proper that they should participate more actively than
those members who are unable to do so for reasons of distance.
Neverthe less, the Associations members in other parts of Canada,
North America and Europe can help our Museum, if not through
volunteer work, then through financial contributions. The crea­
tion of a sustaining category of membership, with a higher
annual subscription, might be one way to provide the financial
assistance so essential to the continuing growth of the projects
of our Association.
Text courtesy of C. S. Cheaiey & Associates.
Photography courtesy of K. DeJean.
PHOTO BELOW I Canad1an Pac1f1c No. 9108 on tra1n J2 from Montreal
to Wells R1ver Vt. at H1ghwater, 11151 AoM. March 26, 1965. Our
SNOW special will follow the same route on March 2, 1968. Why
not j01n us for this most 1nteresting excursion. (G.D.Southwood
photo)
, I ,
-0-
, I
TTA
··Ronia par los siens,
Vaincu par Ie progres,
Un petit train ancien
Lentement
se mOUl·ait.
IIpprenant sa delresse,
Des amis sen murent,
Panserenl
ges blessures,
Lenlourerent de lendr
essG.
All eeeur du Val-de-IAisne,
La pHiit train dantan
A oubHe sa
peine:
II guetlc Ie printemps.
II ehante Ie bonheur
De relrouver sa voie
Au chant
de la vapaur
Comme
au temps aautrefois.
Sa loie esl g,mereuse
En Iann OUR FR lENDS OVERSEAS ••••••••••
Pour VOllS aussl II reve
A une annne heurellse I
THE ASSOCIATION RECENTLY received a jolly Christmas card from Le
Tramway Iour istique de l Aisne, Erezee-Amonines-Dochamps, Ardennes
Belges, Belgium.
The little poem inside is herewith reproduced in translation:
Replaced by our progress-
(But reborn through our trying)
A little old train
Slowly, was dying.
Seeing its sad plight
Its friends, being moved, Bound up
its wounds
And nursed it with love
Midway in Val-de-lAisne
Yesterdays little train,
Watching for Spring
Has forgotten its pain.
It sings of good luck
Of regaining its lines –
To the tempo of steam
As it was in past times.
Its joy is oerflowing
In the year which is ending –
And A Happy New Year
Is the wish it is sending~
Original p06m by p. de Nayre.
by Derek Booth
GO TRANSIT OPERATIONS along the shores of Lake Ontario have
proved such a success that the Government of Ontario has made a first
move toward expanding the pilot programme to serve other parts of the
Toronto district.With the original projected long-term passenger load
of 15,000 a day already exceeded in the first seven months of operation
a survey of other potential commuter lines is being undertaken. One of
the suggested new routes would be in the shape of a U,serving Bramp­
ton and Georgetown on the northwest and Agincourt on the northeast.
INNOVATIONS IN TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGY in Europe have recent­
ly made the news. Frances wheel-less Aerotrain,which operete~ on an
inverted-T concrete track,supported on a cushion of air a tenth-of -an
inch thick,reached speeds of 125 miles per hour in test runs in the vi­
cinity of Gometz-la-Ville,25 miles southwest of Paris.
Meanwhile,in England, work is to start soon on a 20-mile experimentel
track,near Cambridge,to test the 300 m.p.h. Hovertrain. Like tha
Aerotrain,the Hovertrain will ride on an air-cushion about one-half
an inch thick,but the English Test Train will be powered by a linear­
induction motor that will draw the train along, over a continuous rotor
rail of aluminum,in the middle of the rectangular cross-sectioned track.
Engineers hoPE to have the Hovertrain in operation within two and a
half yeers. While tha French prototype is rear-engined and propellor­
driven,it could be modified to use linear induction,or other suitabls
type of propulsion.
ON THE U.S.SCENE,The Interstate Commerce Commission has ap­
proved the merger of a number of northwestern U.S. lines, including The
Great Northern Railway,The Northern Pacific Railway, The Chicago,Bur­
lington and Quincy Railroad,The Pacific Coast Railroad Company and The
Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway Company. The new monsterwill be
called The Great Northern Pacific and Burlington Line,Incorporated J
AFTER 65 YEARS OF OPERATION,The New York Central Systems
renowned Twentieth Century Limited made its last run into Chicago on
December 3rd.,last. Few of the passengers aboard knew (a) the name of
the train they were riding,or (b) that it was its last run. The Final
Indignity: ••••• it arrived nine hours late J
AT A.SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING of the members of the Ass­
ociation held on December 13,1967,a proposal for an increase in the
annual dues for regular and associate members was presented. Owing
to rising coets of secretarial services and production and distrisu­
costs (including poatage) of CANADIAN RAIL,it was recommended that
the fees for regular members for 1968 be $10.00 and for associate mem­
bers, $6.00. This recommendation was ratified by the-affirmative vote
of more than two-thirda of the voting members present at the meeting.
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
Car
Equipment
on
Order
No.
Spec.
Type
of
Nom.
Ton
Special
Deld.
Total
Expect
units
number
~
length
~
features
Series
Builder
in
Nov.67
to
date
~
Remarks
150
F-220-3
Caboose
50
Electric
CN
79200
Ha~ker-
18 148
Dec.67
Mainland
service
lighting
-79349
Sidderley
Deld.
Aug.-28
Sept.-58
Oct.-44 Nov.-18 Dec.-
2
85
F-70-10
Cylindrical
-100
Side-
CN
34600
National
27 27
Dec.67
Temagami Mine
Steel
Ore
dump
-346084
Steel
Car
Ore
Service
Hopper
300
F-110-4
Insulsted
50
6
A
70
9
wide
CN
280500
National
Jan.68
Dely
8-10
cars
Box
Car
Plug
-280799
Steel
Car
daily.Sample
Doors
car
accepted
29
Nov.
67.
100
F-70-11
Steel
100 50
cars;
CN
375027
Marine
Mar.68
Delivery
6-8
Hopper
Low
sir

375076:
Industries
cars/day.
pressure;
CN
371600
50
cars;

371649
gravity gates.
250
Box
50
70 (Out
for
Newsprint
tenders)
15 Coach
CN
360

Hawker-
Feb./Mar.
374
Sidderley
1968
5
Buffeteria
CN
340
Hawker-
Feb./Illar.
344
Sidderley
1968
5
Parlour
CN
320-
Hawker-
Feb./Mar.
324
Sidderley
1968
CANADIAN 27 R A I L
THE eN EXPO-LINER SERVICE,which operated between Montrfial and
Belleville during the past half-year,will remain in service on a
temporary trial basis for an additional six montha.If sufficient pub­
lic support for this aervice is ahown,it will become permanent •••• ao
say CN officials.
THE HOLIDAY SEASON was scarcely a time of rejoicing for a
large number of railway employees across Cansda. At CPs Angus Shops
in Montrfial,2450 workers fsced an enforced three-day year-end layoff
as did 1350 in Winnipeg and an additional 780 in Calgary. Reason wae
said to be declining freight transport activity. Meanwhile,460 worksrs
in Csnadian Nationals Montreal opsrstion have been unemployed since
last September.
AS PART OF THE NEW POLICY to run traina,and not tske them
off,of Delaware & Hudsons new President F.C.Dumaine,jr., dining car
ssrvice has been reinstated on the Laurentian between Albany and Mon­
treal since September last. Meals are servad by charming hostesses with
Miss Claudia Kirby of Albany in charge of one group. Initially,tbe res­
tored service was provided in a leased New Haven caffi-car,but was later
supplied by two diners purchased from the Chesapeake and Ohio,-one
of them lsttered Pere Msrquette. This and other equipment new to the D.
& H. has been reported elsewhere in CANADIAN RAIL,
This action apparently rssulted in a very desirable 47% increass in the
D. & H. passenger revenues during the first nine months of 1967. The
actual figures were $982,585 (9 months-1967) versus $668,646 (same per­
iod 1966).
TWO DIRECTORS OF the Canadian Railroad Historical Associa­
tion have been honored with the award of The Centennial Medal by the
Government of Canada,-c:onferrErd in recognition of valuable service to
the Nation. We congratulate Dr. Robert V.V.Nicholls, our President,
and Mr. R. Wyatt Webb,the Director responsible for construction at the
Associations CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM -MUSEE FERROVIAIRE CANADIEN, on
receiving thie unique Centennial honor.
SIGNS OF THE TIMES: the CN symbol,designed by Alan Fle­
ming,is really famous. Robert de Vito,who has amplified the original
symbol for Company-wide use says that this new symbol is one part of
a complete modernization of sll CN communications,-which, inciden­
tally,or naturally enough,has attracted the envious interest of such
U.S.corporate giants ss Ford Motor Company. Mr. de
Vito explains that symbols,by themsslves,are not enough. He
says A symbol is a cheap wsy of buying instant contemporaneity. If
success is to be realized,a total visual redesign,-right down to the
letterhead and memo forms,is essential. CN haa done just this,and is
sstting the pace for the rest of the world. Another de Vito specula­
tion: CN might just decide to erect e 10 or 12 foot column, paint
it yellow, curve the top into an arrow and create a sculpture that
tells you where the station is 1
Derivative random thought: It just might help at the corner of Dor­
chester Boulevard and Windsor, or at Front and Simcoe 1
Contributions gratefully received from J.Shaughnessy,C.StevenBon and
L.Keiller,among others.
OH WELL-NOTHING VENTURE NOTHING WIN

CANADIAN RAIL Published monthly (except July-August combined) by
the CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, P.O.
Box 22, Station B, l>1ontreal 2, Canada.
Pr oduc tion:
Distr ibution:
Association Membership-including 11 issues of
CANADIAN RAIL ••• • • • • • • • • • • $6.00
M. W. Dean
P. Murphy
J. A.Beatty
S. Worthen
F. F. Angus
Director of Mem­
bership & Branches: J. A. Beatty, 4982 Queen Mary Road, Montreal
29, Que. Canada.
Association Branch~:
OTlAlvA
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Maj. S. R, Elliot, Sect1y., P.O. Box 352, Terminal
A Ottawa, Onto V.
H. Coley, Sect1y., 11243 -72nd Ave., Edmonton,
Alta.
Association Representatives:
OTTAWA VALLEY
SASKATCHEWAN
PAC IFIC COAST
FAR EAST
BR IT ISH ISLES
Copyright 1968
K. F.
J. S.
Peter
W. D.
J. H.
Chivers, Apt. 3, 67 Somerset St. W., Ottawa, Onto
Nicholson, 2306 Arnold St.~ Saskatoon~ Sask •. C
ox, 2936 West 28th Ave.~ vancouver, .J:j.C. •
McKeown, Oaska (Tosabori) YMCA, 2-chome, Nishi-ku,
Osaka, Japan.
Sanders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Beds. England.
Printed in Canada
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