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Canadian Rail 192 1967

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Canadian Rail 192 1967

No. 192 October 1967
copri/ring rhe heorts o/, iTs riders .. ·····
Tro/n 14-
,P0SSlrl.:! over
one 01 rhe
noye / rorary
Sw/tches.
The stutfch
ond shofJ lead
as seen from
a passing traIn.
202
., ••. e.·. i .. , ….
~
H!{ Nt ~. RCl A!{L §
: : : I: :., : I: : : .:: :
by A. Clegg, from information
oourtesy of
Mr. T. Zsenaty &
Mr. D. Munro.
~O 67 is, by almost all standards,an unqualified success.
Judged solely by the pUblished attendance figures, this in un­
questionably so, and the Montreal World I s Fair, the fi rst
Class A Exposition held under the auspices of the Interna­
tional BureaU of Expositions in the Western Hemisphere, is at­
tracting 34~ more visitors than was originally estimated. This
tremendous acceptance of Expo by Montrealers and visitors
alike is nonetheless the cause of one of the chief complaints –
the long line-ups to gain admittance to the various pavilions
and attractions. And nowhere has the waiting been longer and
the queues more extensive than the line-~ to ride the MINI RAIL
the open-air soenic rides around and above the Exposition Gro­unds.
MINIRAIL has oaptured the hearts of praotically all its
riders to an extent not even vaguely foreseen by the Expo plan­
ners. It was designed originally not as an amusement ride, but
as a means of transit –not Rapid Transit, but a seoondary 10-
oal transportation service to accommodate Expo visitors. The
main route, ooloquially known as The Blue Minirail from the
oolour of its oars, was laid out to Pass close to practically
all the important points on the central Part of Ile Ste. Helene
and Ile Notre Dame. (See Exhibit A). The western part of
Ile Ste. Helene and the La Ronde Amusement Park are served by
similar but somewhat smaller MINIRAIL trains operating arer in­
dependent loops and generally referred to as The Yellow Mini­
rails due to the yellow oanopies fitted over the diminutive
open cars.
THE BLUE MINIRAIL
On the major MINIRAIL circuit, there are six passenger stops
strategically located close to the larger Pavilions. The lit­
tle trains Pass beside the giant USSR pavilion, in front of the
British and Frenoh struotures, and thread their way amongst the
large rook slabs at the Ontario exhibit. They pass directly
through the oentre of the pavilion of the United States of Ame­
rioa, which is shaped like a huge crystal ball, although Mini­
rail trains do not halt at this point and the closest passenger
stop is some 1500 feet distant. At one point, between the ex­
hibit of the Provinoe of Ontario and that of the Provinoe of
Quebec, Mlnirail passengers pass under a series of scenio water
falls, whioh cascade down from the main pavilion level to Re­
gatta Lake and the St. Lawrence River below. At two points the
line Passes over itself, while at two other locations, the sys­
tem duoks under the standard-gauge elevated rapid transit sys­
tem EXPO EXPRESS. Those responsible for laying out the MlNI­
RAIL lines oan take full marks for the pioturesque way in which
the diminutive trains wend their way around the scenic wonders
of the exhibition park.
203
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0
SECTION
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1-7 t H,P. D,C. MOTOR
..8
Z+3-21$1 TRAC110N WHi!~LS
4+~-9tg GUIDE WH::ELC
6+7-EMEnGl::HCY ROLLEns
6+9-SUPPLEI.IENlAny ~UIOE WHEELS
10-DlffEREUTIAL OEAR DRIVE
~
CANADIAN 205 R A I L
Operating over the 4.2 miles of track on this major MINIRAIL
line, there are 32 trains of nine cars apieoe. Eaoh train is
125 feet in length and has a maximum capaoityof 102 passen­
gers. Generally speaking, the track is elevated above the
crowded streets and walk-ways, but, as mentioned above, dips
down occasionally almost to the level of the st. Lawrence. All
the trains are crewless and operate somewhat on the idea of an
extended horizontal elevator. They are Painted blue and white
and remind one of the attractive tramcars in LUcerne, Berne, or
Basel. Indeed they Should, for they were designed by the
Swiss firm of Masohinenfabrik Habeggar in Thun, Switzerland,
which company also supplied the running gear and the automatio
oontrol equipment. Carbodies and superstructure were fabrioa­
ted in Canada by the Trusoon Division of Hawker Siddeley, in
Montreal.
Traokage was constructed on the Expo site by Dominion Bridge
Company to Habeggar speoifications, with Herter Todd and Myer
as looal oonsultants. It consists of dOUble I beams, 2l!
aPart, supported on steel A-frames at 50 foot oentres on
straight sections and at 34 foot centres on curved sections.
Track height ranges from ground level to a maximum of 40 feet
above the surroundings. The ruling grade is 10~, and minimum
traok radius is fifty feet.
Bogies between the Passenger Oars ride on two 27 pneumatio­
tyred traction wheels and are guided by four horizontal stabil­
izing wheels of 9i diameter. Other supplementary guide wheels
and emergenoy rollers are provided as shown in Exhibit B. A
differential gear drive transmits power to the traotion wheels
from a 7~ H.P. D.C. electrio motor, giving an average operating
speed of about 7i miles per hour. Maximum speed is in the vi­
cinity of ten miles per hour.
Although the traotion motors operate on D.C., ourrent supply
in the rails is at 440 volts A.C., 60 oycle, 3 phase. This is
converted to Direct Current by a motor-generator set in the
leading unit of each train. Leading units also oontain the
automatic train control mechanism,which governs all the trains
operations except station starting. The only manual controls
on the system are the attendant-oontrolled buttons whioh permit
trains to depart from the stations.
The four stations on the oircuit are named after the nearest
major Pavilion or well-known landmark for which a bi-lingual
designation oan be employed: i.e., Metro; Agriculture; Theme; Canada.
The fact that the trains stop at Agrioulture and Theme
both on the Metro to Canada leg of their run and also on their
return trip makes six stops for a full circuit.
THE YELLOW MINIRAIL
Basically similar to the Blue Minirail system desori bed in
the preceding Paragraphs, the Yellow Minirail is divided into
two loops –one of 1.1 miles length serving the western end of
Ile Ste.Helene -the other 1. 3 miles long oiroling the Amusement
t ouTomat;c CO/7/ro/s
piloT mi/7/roll fro//7S
arou/7d the grou/7ds
0/ Ex.P
0
67
Mr. TZse/70Ty, in charge 0/
The Mlnirail, beside The
TronSfer Table /Uh/ch dislri­
.butes troins onTo the shop
o/7d s/oroge Trocks.
CANADIAN 207 R A I L
Park area of La Ronde. There are twelve trains on eaoh of these
two lines, with a consist of sixteen oars per train. In spite
of the greater number of Passenger-carrying units Per train,the
total length of the Yellow trains is only 10,5 feet, compared
to the 12,5 ft.-long trains on the Blue system. Comparative
passenger capaci ti es are 60 for the Yellow trains and 102 for
the IIBlue •.
Traok
structure is ~tlydifferent in detail, but basioally
similar on all lines. Mojan Lteewere the Montreal contractors
for erection of the small rninirail s trackage. .
Historically, the European-built Yellow trains have a more ohequered
oareer than their Montreal-built Blue cousins. They were
oonstruoted in Switzerland by the Habegger firm at Thun in
1964 for the Swiss National Exhibition held that year at Lauz­
anne. At ttJ.at time they were manually controlled but were con­
verted to automatic operation for service at Expo 67. Sinoe
1964 they have been held in storage, pending just such a use as
they are now receiving in Canada.
FARE STRUCTURE
Rides on the Ile Ste.Helene and La Ronde minirail loops are
forty cents per Passenger, each line. Tariffs on the Ile Notre
Dame system –the more extensive Blue line –have been re­
vised, and now it costs fifty oents per half-oirouit. After
operating for a number of weeks on a basis of ,50 oents admis­
sion –ride where you wish IF you oould get on, the author­
ities inaugurated a polioy of forcing everyone off at the Metro . and
the Canada stations, making riding the MINIRAIL consider­
ably more expensive and somewhat less popular. Now, however,
the queues to gain admittanoe to this popular attraotion are of
reasonable proportions and the stations are not so oompletely
overwhelmed by intending Passengers. .(Personally, I feel,
however, that it would have been preferable to allow a complete
round trip for the advanoe payment of one dollar.)
The oomplete MINIRAIL system is owned cutright by the Canadian
Corporation for the 1967 World Exhibition. First intentions
were to assign this seoondary transportation facility to a oon­
oessionaire,but this plan was later changed and the MINIRAIL is
operated as part of the Expo67 services. Its popularity seems
to have justified this change of programme, and it was reported
at the end of July that over seven million Passengers had tra­
velled on the Mlnirail lines during the first three months of
operation.
Pride in its aooomplishments and its popularity i8 only
olouded by the rQalization that it is sO temporary. With the
olosiiig of EXPO 67 in Ootober, the Minirail System will no doubt be
dismantled and its rolling stook stored for use at some fu­
ture exhibition.. It is a pityl1Jl Indeed, it would be so
nioe to be able to ride the attraotive little oars in future
years —-lIiaybe around the enla.rged Ile Ste. Helene Park, or
possibly up the slopes of Mount Royal to the summit of the Mbun­
tain whioh overlooks the Montreal metropolis.

CANADIAN
209
R A I L
C N Tests Turbo Train
C
ANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS long-awaited Turbo Trains are now
ready to undergo their first operational tests.
During the early part of November,the revolutionary trainsets
are to pe operated both in the Montreal Locomotive Works yards and
on the a.N.R. s Joliette Subdivision near Montreal. After com­
pletion of these runs, they will then be sent to the United Air­
craft Companys plant near Providence, Rhode Island, for further
experiments, and will be back in Canada during the winter fur a
series of cold-weather trials. While no date has been set for the
inauguration of Passenger services, the Canadian Nationals aim is
to have the Turbos operational by next spring.
Difficulties in procuring essential parts forced the railway
to postpone the starting date for the new Turbo service thricein
1967, first from April to June, then until the end of October, and
finally until 1968. With the peak traffic season now over for
1967, the C.N. prefers to use the off-season for more extensive
testing of the new equipment, rather than attempt to rush the
Turbos into service during the winter. The five trainsets should
be thoroughly tested and ready to receive p~engers by the change­
of-time next April.
The adjacent illustration, courtesy Canadian National Railways,
shows the first trainset, headed by power car P 100, standing out­
side the eastern Montreal plant of the Montreal Locomotive Works.
In a forthcoming issue of Canadian Rail, we hope to include
photographs showing the units being tested on line.
Road designation of the Turbos on the CN is to be as follows:
Parlour-Domes P 100 to P 104
Coach-Domes P 200 to P 204
Parlour-Coaches T 100 to T 104
Coaches T 200 to T 214
Coaches with meal T 300 to T 304
service.
(For details of the principle of the U.A.C. Turbo Trains, see
Canadian Rail for April 1966 –pages 74 to 81.)
(Photographs of the units under construction were reproduced
in Canadian Rail –pages 86 to 89 (April) 1967.)
If you keep your copy of Canadian Rail please change
the date in the last paragraph on Page 184 (Sept. issue.)
The end of electric car service along St.Catherine Street
occurred on September 3, 1956 –NOT Aug.31,1955 as shown.
This was an editorial error and did not occur in Mr.Binns
original manuscript.
CANADIAN 210 R A I L
A Ne~ HOD1e £or SaD1S0D
Info. from Mr. Hugh MacPherson
fi1notable centennial project is that of the Pictou County Histo­
~ rical Society which recently received a ~20,OOO grant from the
Nova Scotia and Canadian governments to relocate Samson in a new home. The new
building on New Glasgows Arohimedes Street, is
64 feet long, 14 feet high, and 14 feet wide. The building has an
all-glass front and is lighted at night. _
The
following account of Samson is oopied from The Free
Lance, New Glasgow, Nova Scotia:
The history of the Samson has been written many times, but here
are a few facts and figures for those unfamiliar with it. The Samson
is the oldest original locomotive in Canada by a margin
of 35 years and the third oldest on the continent. It is the
second oldest surviving Hackworth engine in the world (the old­
est, the Sans Pareil, is on permanent display in a London,
England, Railway Station.
The Samson claims many firsts, too many to enumerate here, and
it was the largest and most powerful locomotive in North America
for many years. It was the first in North America to operate on
Whatts, now called standard gauge.
It, along with two similar locomotives, the Hercules and the
John BuddIe, was brought to Pictou in crates on the brig, Ythan,
on May 27, 1839. It was assembled and was the first of three to
run on the new Albion line, where for thirty years it hauled coal
the six miles from the pithead to the loading piers at Dunbar
Point. Then in 1867, Confederation Year, it semi-retired to
headquarters at the Old Foord Pit which had been sunk the previ­
ous year by the General Mining Association. There it worked un­
til 1883 when it went to Chicago for the National Exhib1tion Of
Railway Appliances.
The Samson then returned to the Old Foord Pit where, in 1884,
it went on the scrap track. It sat there for nine years until
the Baltimore and Ohio Railway sent their press agent to borrow
it for the Chicago World Fair in 1893. This was the beginning
of 35 years exile from Nova Scotia.
Through the efforts of a few determined men, both the Samson
and the 18 year younger Albion were returned to Halifax where
the two engines sat neglected for three years in a vacant lot
behind the Nova Scotian Hotel but finally were put under cover
in a train shed.
In 1950, Michael Dwyer, then Mayor of New Glasgow, borrowed
them for the towns 75th Incorporation Anniversary. It was then
agreed that the 10.an be continued indefinitely and Mayor Dwyer,
after being successful in getting preferable Sites, persuaded
the town council to house the Samson in its present ~tion near
the CNR station here in New Glasgow.
The Samson
is unique in the literal sense of the word, there
is no other like it.
PROPOSED NEW HOME FOR THE SAMSON is shown in the above architectural drawing.
It is a Centennial project by the Pictou County Htstorical Society In co-operation with the Town of New Glasgow and the provin­cial and federal governments.
Harry C. Allin. Etobicoke, checks the steam pressu re as he fires up his personal Centennial project. The
74 gauge Centennial #4 is a precision model of a locomotive that hanled trains from Aurora to Toronto at the time of Confederation.
Mr. Allin built the coal-fired model in 1500 working hours and gave
it its Centennial run May 13 at a garden ceremony for the Toronto Society of Model Engineers.
CANADIAN 212 R A I L
It is regretted that the compilation of the material for the
CPR POHER-2 columns is proceeding at a slower rate than expected.
Consequently, Canadian Rail shall continue with the CN locomotive
types in the order indicated, and CP types shall appear as soon as
possible .

CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Deliveries: up to 11 September 1967.
2000 and 2001, serials M-3479-01 and ~1-3479-02, were outshop­
ped on 18/08/67 and 29/08/67 respectively. 2001 is somewhat of an
experimental unit, being equipped with the following extras: Vap­
our Alerter, Large Fuel Tank, Acrylic Paint, Slipped Pinion Detec­
tion, Collision Posts, and Dalmo Victor Harness.
Retirements: up to 09 September 1967.
ROAD NUMBER SERIAL BUILDER BUILT RETIRED
1602 2655 CLC 0]/12/51 07/08/67
2203 2865 CLC 30/03/55 10/08/67
3023 MLW 02/09/54 07/08/67
3031 81026 MLW 30/09/54 07/08/67
3063 81180 MUI 10/08/55 07/08/67
3809 81214 MLW 31/10/55 07/08/67
9446 79148 MLW 17/03/53 07/08/67
9448 791
/
9
MLW 17/03/67 07/08/67
Units 1607, 1632, 3012, 3086, 3805, 9419 have been filed for
retirement approval. On 02 August 1967, Train #3 with locomotives
6522:6538:4118 met head-on with Manifest #402 with units 3694:3221:
3204, (locomotives in these orders), at Dunrankin, Ontario, on the
Oba Subdivision. As a consequence, units 6522, 3694, and 3221 will
be retired. The other three will be repaired.
Locomotive Transfers: up to 09 September 1967.
ROAD NUMBERS TRANSFERRED FRO!! TRANSFERRED TO
3850 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Bgn.
3883 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
8192 Prairie Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
8193 Prairie Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
D500 St. Lawrence Rgn. Atlantic Rgn.
BLE LEASED UNITS Prairie Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
DATE
01/07/67
18/07/67
25/08/67
25/08/67
10/08/67
24/08/67
CANADIAN 213 R A I L
Rentals: up to 09 September 1967.
N&W 3658, 3671, 3726 were returned to their owner on 17 August
1967, while Precision Engineering leased GP-9s 5960 and 5962 to CN
on 03 July for use on the Great Lakes Region.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Rentals: up to 07 September 1967.
The five BLE units leased by CP have been recalled to St. Luc
where they are to be stored serviceable until further notice.
Rebuilds: up to 09 September 1967.
The CLC parts which CP purchased from CN are to be used to
repair CP unit 4054. (Information courtesy Clayton F. Jones).
NORTHERN ALBERTA RAILWAYS
Mr. Clayton F. Jones sends the following information about
NARs passenger operations. At the timetable change in October
1966, CP 9023 was used on all passenger runs (Trains 1, 2, 7, 8).
This was excellent utilization of the unit as it was in operation
nearly every day of the week. With the time-card change this
Spring, 9023 is used only on Trains 1 and 2, while 7 and 8 have re­
verted to ~l1xed 77 and 78, operating three times a week. This la t­
ter service had been only twice weekly since 1960 or before.
* ERRATUM
1) #180 mentioned the remaining CN 1700 series C-C units being dis­
patched to the Atlantic Provinces. This should, of course, have
read the remaining AlA-AlA units.
2) #189 and #191 stated that DMI units 155 and 158 arrived at CN on
29 April of this year, while #190 cleverly contradicts this with
a date of 28 April. #190 is wrong.
3) #188 reported units 912 and 920 damaged when they collided with
a switcher in Cornerbrook yard while heading Train 203. Mr. C.
S. Steeves reports that, in actuality, #190 was performing the
switching duties and #912 was the lead unit on Train 203.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
FPA-2s and FPA-4 s
By : Murray W. Dean
William G. Blevins
. The American Locomotive Companys first foray into the passenger
diesel-electric locomotive field was the slant-nosed DL-109 model, first
delivered in 1940 to the Chicago , Rock Island and Pacific. The loco­
motive contained two 6 cylinder , 1000 horsepower McIntosh & Seymour
( an ALCO subsidiary) 539 turbocharged prime movers and had an
AlA-AlA wheel arrangement. Three 1500 hp ALCO 241 engined B-B
units , similar in styling to the DL-109 , were briefly demonstrated in
freight service before being scrapped in 1946. Meanwhile A LCO devel­
oped the 244 prime mover with 9 x 10! cylinders and it was applied in
a 12 cylinder version to a newly styled flat-nosed 1500 hp freight B-B
unit designated model FA -1 , specification DL-208 , the first of which
were delivered to the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio at the end of 1945. By
1950 an upgraded FA-1 , with specification DL-208C , was in service
sporting an improved 244 engine which gave a locomotive rating of 1600
hp. The FA-2 model was introduced in 1950 and was similar in all
major respects to the FA-1 except that it was lengthened by about 2 feet.
A dual service unit designated FPA-2 was offered by ALCO and Montreal
Locomotive Works, being in fact a standard FA-2 equipped with a steam
generator. From 1958 to 1959 both ALCO and MLW catalogued the
DL-218, model FPA-4, containing a 12 cylinder ALCO 251B prime
mover generating 1950 hp of which 1800 hp was available for traction.
There were no purchasers of this model in the United States. Conversely
the A lA-AlA A LCO passenger units offered in the flat-nosed styling be­
tween 1946 and 1953 found no buyers in Canada. These locomotives con­
tained one A LCO 244 prime mover with 16 cylinders and were offered in
three models : PA-1 , PA-2 and PA-3. A demonstrator team was tried
out in Canada with seemingly indifferent results. High horsepower pass­
enger power did not find great favour with Canadian railways.
The Canadian National Railways received its first A LCO-type A -units
from the Montreal Locomotive Works on 25 April, 1950. Numbers 9400 and 9401 (
the first two locomotives of an eight unit order ) were model
FA-1 and were the first A-units produced by a Canadian locomotive man­
ufacturer. Subsequently CN ordered 1600 hp FA-2 models also for freight
service. In 1955 CN bought 6 FPA-2 models , specification DL-212A ,
from MLW for passenger duties . They were assigned numbers 6706-6711
class MPA-16a, and later were renumbered 6750-6755. These loco­
motives were joined in late 1958 and early 1959 by 34 FPA -4 modelS ,
specification DL-218 , numbered 6760-6793 , classes MPA-18a to MPA-18b
and containing the ALCO model 251B turbocharged prime mover . The
MPA -16a class, numbers 6750-6755 cost $218, 583 each including tax
while class MPA-18b , numbers 6767-6793 cost $243,776 each.
Classes MPA-16a and MPA-18c are equipped with cast frame
trucks and Timken roller bearing axle journals while class MPA -18a and
class MPA-18b use swing bolster trucks with SKF roller bearing axle
journals. Each truck has 40 diameter steel wheels and a 9-4 wheelbase.
The General Electric 752 traction motor is standard equipment as is the
GE GT-581 main generator . The maximum speeds of these units have
received various adjustments and the present rating of 92 miles per hour
with a gear ratio of 62:21 was applied du,ring 1963 . Multiple Unit control
connections were· installed on both the front and rear of 6760-6793 when they
were built. However , the connections for 6750-6755 had to be add­
ed to the nose end ill order for them to be MUd within any locomotive
consist. This feature was applied at Montreal between December 1956 and
December 1957 at a cost of $886 each. None of the FPA-2s or
FPA-4s are equipped with dynamic braking. As is standard on all CN
road units there are facilities in the cab for holding a portable 2-way
CANADIAN
215
R A I L
short-wave radio. The pilots of the MPA -16a class were modified during
1956 and 1957 to reduce the pilot width by 4 inches to clear the station
platform of the Canadian Pacific Railways Windsor Station in Montreal.
Beginning in 1959 classes MPA-16a, MPA-18a and MPA-18c received an
automatic transition feature which obviated the need for steps 2 , 3 and
4 of the selector controller. From 1962 all the FPA-2
s
and FPA-4
s
received modifications to the radiator shutter assemblies so that hot
engine problems caused by the shutters blowing closed at high speeds
could be eliminated.
In 1958 numbers 6751 and 6755 were withdrawn from service and
sent to the Montreal Locomotive Works where the ALCO 244 prime mover
was replaced with an A LCO 251B engine which increased the locomotive
rating to 1800 hp. At this time other minor changes were effected but
most major components such as the frame , body shell and trucks were
modified only insomuch as was required to install the 251B engine. The
rebuilt locomotives were designated class MPA-18c and were renumbered
as follows: 6751 to 6759 and 6755 to 6758. Prior to the rebuilding the
estimated cost was $30, 000 each . The MLW model for 6758 and 6759 is
FPA-4 but they are distinguished from the standard FPA-4 by the lack of
the extra radiator grating below the main radiator shutters. The prime
mover removed from 6751 and 6755 and the corresponding B-units 6851 and 6855
had their 1760 horsepower rating lowered and were used to
power the four RSC-24 model, 1400 hp , A lA-AlA road switcher loco­
motives built for CNR by MLW in 1959 and assigned road numbers 1800-1803 ,
class MR-14a .
As of 31 July, 1967 , number 6750 has run 1,879,397 miles,
6760 has run 1,434,894 miles, while the last A-unit built for a Canadian
railway, number 6793 has run only 892,768 miles. At this moment all
Canadian Nationals FPA-2
s and
FPA-4
s
are assigned to the St. Law­
rence Region and none have been retired, excepting, of course, 6751 and
6755. A diagram is shown for class MPA-18a and the weights shown on
it apply only to 6760 and are correct for Autumn 1960 .
OIU(L (NG-IN[: 1600 BoP.
ALCO D.::.W. V-type
12 <:Iylindor. 9 ooro, l(r~n stroko
1000 R.P.!.!. Fulillpead
350 R.P.ld. Idling
CAPACITIES
2 M.P.H
6 ! 21 ~ ~[~. RATIO
(f) T.E. .STARTING
-T.C. CONTINUOUS 3. 0
~ OPDt. CUR …. E ALONE: COUPLEO:
DIESEL UNIT DATA BOOK
6
MPA-16Q,. .T~2 Tb .T5~
~~
30.4407
LIGHT
PPA-2
LOADEO 1956
WKU.5: TYPE CLA).S STEAM GENERATOR
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT ….
Vapor 01(-4626
TRACTION MOTORS XlLIAAf ~N:TYPE .
….
OE. OT-Z7
… COMPRESSOR
0&. 7SZ
1IIlUtinghou-:e 3CDC
ALTERNATOR: TYPI: • N_
T.M. BLOWEFt MOTOflS
COOLINC. rANS Two
eno ~oh!lnioll Dri.o G.C. GT-29
M,u. CONTROL
Too
MAIN G£NER,OR
… BRAKE
DYNAMIC. . .K,
Westinghouso 24 ;n. C.r.. GT-581 No
the form of eN 676S , 6860 and 6858 provides the kee:p
the sixteen car train moving near Wentworth
, In May of 1965. (Photo <;ourtesy of Canadian National)
Canadian NatiOnal 6755 and 6855
vlliJre rebuilt in 1958 to 6758 and 6858
respectively. Originally it had been planned to rebuild anci upgrade all
of the FPA-2s andFfJB-2s but only twp A-units and two B-units were
done. Jrt 1958 the bell under the pilots of the ivlPA-16is were relocated
to the cab roof. From 1963 an passenger A-units received ben ringer
heaters t9 eliminate malfunctions due to cold weather . (Photo cOlr.tesy of Canadian National)
DIU(L (NC;IN[: 1000 B.P.
Aloo 261 V-t¥Pt
12 CylLndn, 9 bore, lOA .trom
1000 R.P.U. PUll .pud
400 R.P .K, Idl.
• Fonnorly 6755 6751
CAPACITIES
DIESEL UNIT DATA BOOK MPA-18c
~ NUMBERS
WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION BUIl.D(R !x.L ….
1 FR. MAX~EAR MAX TOTAL ORDER NA. 4407
UNIT 67~e 1,30,950 1130,5751261,525 MODEL Ns>. PPA-4
tn;IT 6?5!i 1,30,3 1129775 260,100 DATE BUILT . 11165
x Re-8nSined 1958
Wl«l.L5; TYP[ & CLAjS
A-O e
snAM GEN(RATOR
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
(be Vlpor 01-4626
[Nc… COOLING WATER 208 UfP. GAL. TRAC.TlON MOTORS
~
~U.~.~~An~NiG~0~IL§~~~~1~67~~~P.~G~A~L.r5UR~;::v.~~~::-r.:~~:~~:~I PCJJR G.E. 7:52
U)(ILlAR/ GEN: TYPE .. ~.
FUEL OIL IMP. GAL. JOURNALS: TYPE L Silt AIR COMPRESSOR
G.B. (JT..27
;~~~M 3~~C.! .. T[R 1550 I~ ~~. Tiabn at % 12 lToetloghol.ltJe 3 roc k, __ =~~=~ALT[RNATOR : TYPE NJI.
1.::======j:======+ ___ -.-.= .. ___ -l-_7==;:-.. :;:;-; __ ~T.M, BLOWER MOTORS
t-TRUC.IS COOLING rANS
OF:ERATING FEATURES
MAX, PUD o. ~P.H
GrAR RATIO 62 ,21
T.E. .HARTING
T.E. CONTINUOUS 38 000 b.
OPO!. CURVE ALON C~!,~

OIUlL (NGINt: 1800 B.P.
Aloo 251 V-ty?O
lZ oyllnder. 9 bor&. 10l ,troke
1000 !I.P.U. ru}} epe?,d
400 il.?l. Idlng
It [TIITffiT1ll
1 0
I
Cut lru., cne ~ohall1od Drift
G.B. aT_29
M.U. CONTROL
y ..
Modol KT-50662
MAIN GENtRATOR
OYN~IC BRAKE:
1Io
AIR BRAKE
,u 1;1 nghoullO 24 RL
G.R. -581
DIESEL UNIT DATA BOOK MPA-e.~
TOb T ceo 6-
CLASS NUM6[RS
WEIGHT 01 ST RIBUT ION BUILDER ll.J …….
rR.~IN REAR ~IN. TOTAL FR …. AX. iEAR … AX TOTAL ORDER Nil. SO. HOB
LICHT 1115,830 1112,235 1228,440 115,970 I 111,C60 12:50,000 MODEL NJt FPA-4
LOADED 1129,980 1127,760 1257,740 130,120 IlZ9,200 T 259,300 iATE BUUJ 1958
1,
I–A~
~~
~
::; S:~ .. li~ 117 ~~ ~
0
il::
F-f ~
1=
I-IIiJ-=
1-
p g ~ ~ t..–n1 rnlf I
;;
I iti$1 llR U}
lD~
[-.,
30-
I—
,,,-,<>,—
~4-
w~s; TYPE & CLA,.s STEAM C.tNtR … TOR
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
CAPACITIES
!-40 err (no V. por OiI-4625
,AUX.ILlAR/ GtN:TYP( k-
[NG. COOLING WAHR 1 noIP. c. … L. TRACTION MOTOR.S
UJBRICAnNG OIL 186 IL(P. GAL.
Four
C.G.g. aT-27
FUEL OIL 1).4P.(;.AL.. JOURNALS: TYPE .. SQr AIR COMPRESSOR
G.F;. 762 ,AM)
liOftA.GE CU· rT. S.K.F. S~ ~ 12 1fostlnghoullo 3CDC ALTERNATOR: TYPE .. N_
STEAM GtN. WATER 5 I~(;.AL.
T.M. BLOWER GTA S PAl
TAUCIS COOLINC. FANS ho
OPERATING FEATURES Swing Bolstor Ono Koppers Sturtov8nt M.U. CONTROl.
l.4A)(. S!UD 9: I.A.P:H Model MT-5088 Rl&ht angle drive lIIehoniOlll Driw y ••
CtAR RATIO 62 . 21 MAIN GENERATOR
T.E. HARTING
ooofbi;–
AI. 8RAKE
OYNMIC 8RAIE
T.E. CONTINUOU.5
iTestinghoull6 21-ru. C.G.:::. GT-581
No
OPm. CURVE ALONE: 2 < PLED: 2
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
FPA-2s and FPA-4s
MONTREAL LOCOMOTIVE WORKS LIMITED, MONTREAL, QUEBEC
Present Date First Date Builders
Road No. Applied Road No. . Built Class Serial Order No . Weight Notes
6750 05/10/56 6706 23/03/55 MPA-16a 79197 4407 259,400
6751 26/11/56 6707 28/03/55

79198

1
6752 04/12/56 6708 06/04/55

79199

258,750
6753 29/08/56 6709 13/04/55

79200

257, 570
6754 13/12/56 6710 21/04/55

79201

257,570
6755 13/09/56 6711 29/04/55

79202

-2
6758 27/11/58

29/04/55 MPA-18c 79202

261,525 2
6759 28/10/58

28/03/55

79198

266,100 1 6760


24/10/58 MPA-18a 82269 4408 259, 300
6761 —
31/10/58

82270

258,700
6762
–13/11/58

82271

258,670
6763

24/11/58

82272

258,480
6764

-02/12/58

82273

257,740 6765

-12/12/58

82274

258,130
6766

19/12/58

82275

258,630
6767 – –
05/01/59 MPA-18b 83145 4409· 258,385 6768
–19/01/59

83146

258,530
6769 —
2,3/01/59

83147

258,110 6770
–23/01/59

83148

258,010
6771 – –
30/01/59

83149

258, 135
6772 —
30/01/59
II
83150

258,180
6773 —
06/02/59

83151

258, 180
6774
– –
19/02/59

83152

258,225
677q —
19/02/59

83153

258,285
6776

27/02/59

83154

258,235
6777

09/03/59

83155

257,670 6778
–13/03/59

83156

257,605
6779 —
13/03/59

83157

258, 235
6780 —
23/03/59

83158

258, 165
6781 —
23/03/59

83159

257,915
6782

31/03/59

83160

258, 155
6783 —
31/03/59

83161

258,125
6784 —
08/04/59

83162

258,075
6785
–08/04/59

83163

257,685
6786 /

20/04/59

83164

258,075
6787

20/04/59

83165

258,215
6788

24/04/59

83166

258,365
6789

24/04/59

83167

258,955 6790

30/04/59

83168

258,820
6791

30/04/59

83169

258,790
6792
–13/05/59

83170

258,365
6793
– –
13/05/59

83171

258, 315
NOTES:
1. 6751 rebuilt as 6759 at MLW , outshopped 28 October , 1958.
2. 6755 rebuilt as 6758 at MLW , outshopped 27 November , 1958.
218
~;eth~~0;~rg;r~66
SY~iIT,ld
0(0
tt
~
~
an
~a;~
n
:
~
t
~~
fo;
;
W:.
lM
nt
~~~dN~1:fn~:s~:
a~~
~
~
~-~
:
~
~l~
;
~
~
i~
~~H
o
~
t~
2~~~~aa~~
FJoling
Equipment.
(Photo
cou
rU$y
of CanadLan
National)
CN
€-
7
6-4
l
-:-
atls
t!
,
t:
Gcc~
n
I.lJr..1!od
at .
J,c
!ltu.orl!.
Station
J
No

:!.
Scotia,
in
May 1J05 •
&.
lJilln1c.O
in
l!:l
S9
, nOit
tio
nnl la
<:!
OO
r
brack
ets
we
re
applied
nc
r
to
the
top
01
lbf
n
o::.&
to
IlCI
!i.:J.
:i.
s.:U
1!
r
OiS
t for a l
ad
der
when thc
wlnd
:.;r.ie
l
m.
We11!
OiI!:t:t;9
waahed .
in
!
~OVOCJbot
r
l!il65
CN initIa
ted
U1e
ol
;.
~:uJ
o!
:!lOd!:i
old.:
~
on
LbO
left
and
right
hIu14
:;tde:;:;
of
the
n
~.
door
on
:.til
t
i:
~
;1A
-23
:.::.n
d
rPA-4s

(
Ph
oto
court
e::j of
CtA;l.dbn
NatIonal)
~
.
CNR
13
7
00
is
an
FPA-2 and
was
later
renumbeled
to
6750 .
A
t\1n
sealed
bc
aI:l
t,eadUght
replaced
the
orlginal
single
lamp
in
classes
NlPA-16a
and
MF
A-lSc
.
Thls
was
dO!le
during
the
period
1908
to
1965.
(Photo
courtesy
of
Ca.ladian NatlonaU
LAST REMNANT OF
THE WASRJ:NGTONJ:AN
DJ:SAPPEABS
CN recently removed the vest:lg1al portion of its once proud Montreal­
New York-Washington service. Shown at Cantie Station is the Mont­
real-Cantie RDC Car (Trains 633, 634), shortly before the run was
cancelled last August. Train orders for the final run are repr~
duced below. Photo opposite, below, from Geoff Southwood.
r-1It.. I CANADIAN NAllONAL RAILWAYS
– V FORM 19.

_ .. –
….. « …..
••
220
Train orders oourtesy Mr.P.Stebens,
Conductor on the last trip.
,..,…,.1 CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
– V FORM 191
-…..
,-­
….p106 …. JS ..
• 1 A …. t..
vntUJl(6»D)~~
10
_So
,.~
Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway #137 is shown under steam
at Haileybury, Ontario, on an ONR Centennial Excursion. The train
is starting south after backing from Cobalt, Ontario. (Photo cour­
tesy W.R. Linley).
Photo by Geoffrey D. Southwood
by Derek Booth
a GO Transit passenger traffic has exceeded predictions by 14 per
oent. During the first month of operation 123,817 commuters used
the transit system between Hamilton and Pickering. This popu­
larity has led to parking problems at at least three stations -­
Pickering, Egl1nton and Oakville –where estimates of required
parking space have fallen far short of the demand.
a Railway stations have recently been getting face liftings of one
sort or another. On July 11, Mayor Sarto Desnoyers of Dorval
officially opened the new CN station at Dorval. The new structure
of concrete and brick boasts a 100 seat waiting room and a ticket
sales installation which is integrated into the CN electroniC
reservation system. On a slightly different note, two CP stations
have also undergone renovations of another kind. CP decided to
profit from the unused waiting room in its North Hatley, p.Q.,
station and it now houses an automatic laundry service. In a
similar, although infinitely more ignominious issue, in the eyes
of rail fans, CP has rented the waiting room of its St. Jerome
station to the Provincial Transport Bus Company for a period of
two years. No such reprieve seems in store for the CP station at
Eastray, P.Q., which has been closed and appears to be awaiting
the wreckers hammer.
a CN reports that passenger traffic as a whole this year is between
30 and 35 per cent higher than last year with the heaviest increase
over 80 per cent –between Montreal and Toronto.
a CP has introduced Canadas first unit train to haul sulphuric acid
from the Canadian Industries Ltd. plant at Copper Cliff to the
companys ammonia and fertilizer complex near Sarnia. The train
will run the 490 miles between the two points twice a week. The
train consists of 37 cars and this will eventually be increased
to 56 cars in keeping with the new transportation laws which en­
able the railways to base rates on trainlOad shipments of either
37 or 56 oar lots rather than only on single oarloads.
a The city of New York is reported to be interested in purchasing
48 air-conditioned rapid transit cars now in use at Expo 67 on
the Expo Express. The price would total $3,840,000. The cars
would operate on the Staten Island rapid transit line between
Tottenville and the St. George ferry terminal. The B&O operates
the line under a subsidy from the city.
a CN has announced a further delay in the introduction of the Turbo
Train as a result of continuing procurement problems and pro­
duction delays experienced throughout the aircraft industry in
North America. The previously announced date for the introduction
of the Turbos was the end of October but no new target date has
been set. Expected date is the Spring 1968 timetable change.
~ Another change from plans as announced by Canadian National Rail­
ways concerns the local Passenger trains operating between MOntreal
and Montreal North. As mentioned in Canadian Rail last month,
the railway had planned on disoontinuing the service effective
i September 1st, last, but at the last minute the abandonment order
was rescinded. The service will continue until further notice. ~
-by Walter Bedbrook –
~
iggYbaCking is a word that recalls youthful times upon the back
of an affectionate and condescending father. To the more rail­
road minded it is a term referred to in the carrying of road
trailers between cities on specially adapted flat cars. The sophis­
ticated railroader abandons the term Piggybacking completely and
simply calls them TOFC i.e. trailer on flat car.
It was therefore somewhat of a pleasant switch to the
accustomed sight of a TOFC when a SORT was sighted at the C.P.R.
station at Finch, Ont., in June 1966. This particular SORT belonged
to Canadian Pacific Telecommunications Ltd presumably having run­
ning rights over the C.P. Railway.
In case you are wondering, a SORT is speeder on road
trailer.
a The Cumberland Railway, owned by Dominion Steel and Coal Corp.,
has been authorized to abandon its 12 mile branch line from
Broughton Jct. to Louisburg, N.S., after May 1, 1968.
a A Washington company has been commissioned to do a feasibility
study of a proposed 500 mile extension of the Alaska Railroad to
Bornite, north of the Arctic Circle. There the Kennecott Copper
Co. has done development work on what appears to be extensive
high grade copper deposits; the railway would provide the
company with an outlet to the sea if and when the mine goes into
production.
223
OUT OF TOUCH
Doug Wr}ght –Montreal Star
Theyve got a diesel here that weighs 125 tons and costs a quarter of a million dollars
-but they have to send someone down the line to a phone!.
CANADIAN RAIL: Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Committee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Associate Membership –including 11 issues
of Canadian Rail: (1967 issues) S 4.00
PUBLICAT IONS CO~INITTEE:
EDITOR, CANADIAN RAIL:
ASSOCIATE EDITOR:
NEWS EDITOR:
POWER EDITOR:
D.R. Henderson, Chairman Anthony CleBe
William Phnroah
William Pharoah
Anthony Clegg Derek Booth Murray
Dean
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP and BRANCHES:
J.A.Beatty, 4982 Queen Mary Road, Montreal, Quebec.
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES and REPRESENTATIVES:
OTTAWA BRANCH: Major S.R.Elliot, secretary, Box 352, Term. A, Ottawa, Ont.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN BRANCH: V.H.Coley, Sec; 11243-72nd Ave., Edmonton, Alta.
SASKATCHEWAN: J.S.Nicolson, 2306 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Sask.
OTTAWA VALLEY: K.F.Chivers, Apt.3, 67 Somerset St. W., Ottawa, Ont.
FAR EAST: W.D.McKeown, c/o Osaka Tosabori) YMCA,
2 -chome, Nishi-ku, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: J.H.Sanders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyright 1967 Printed in Canada on Canadian
paper

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