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Canadian Rail 191 1967

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Canadian Rail 191 1967

)ffimnll
No. 191 September 1967
••••• as unobtrusive as possible, with the hope that
they would disappear into the drab urban landsoape •••••
The Crey Cars
-by R. M. Binns –
L
OOKING BACK over the electric tramway era in Montreal, any re­
view of the rolling stock would be incomplete indeed if a rather
substantial fleet of flat cars and side dump cars were not in­
cluded. Of the various types of work cars and rail-borne machin­
ery required for construction and maintenance purposes on a large
tramway system, these prosaic vehicles for the carrying of bulk
materials were by far the most numerous and familiar to the public.
In addition to the use of the dump and flat cars by the Co~ys
Construction Department, from about 1910 until the mid-1920s, a
flourishing commercial freight business was conducted with these
vehicles. It was common to see convoys of these cars on the
streets, carrying sand, crushed stone, cement and other construction
materials for builders and industrial firms. The materials would
be delivered to a point nearest to the construction site and dumped
directly on the street. From there it was the consignees obliga­
tion to remove the material, by wagon or wheelbarrow, as soon as
possible. The Companys charge for this service was based on vol­
ume and mileage and included a charge of five cents per ton to the
City for cleaning up the street afterwards.
Most of the bulk materials came from the quarries in the north­
eastern part of Montreal, where spur tracks were built into the
crushers and stock piles. Many of the quarries have long since
been filled in, -DeFleurimont Street quarry east of Christophe­
Colomb, Rosemont quarry at 26th Avenue and the Villeray quarry,
which was reached by a track along Jarry Street. Spur tracks were
also provided at cement plants and other suppliers of building
materials.
The Company had a Freight Department which handled this part of
the business, including the switching and interchange of railroad
freight cars by electric locomotives at a few industrial plants,
and the handling of steam road cars carrying race horses for Blue
Bonnets Race Track. Also there was the package freight and farm
produce business on the former Terminal Railway Line between eastern
Montreal and Bout de llle.
But to return to our subject; the flat cars and the dump cars.
These vehicles were strictly functional and built in the Simplest
manner, with an austere rectangular operating car and no embellish­
ment or styling of any kind. They were painted a medium grey with
black numbers. It seemed as if the Company wanted to make them as
unobstrusive as possible, with the hope that they would disappear
into the drab urban landscape.
Going over existing records, the first mention of flat cars is
eleven flat cars included with the Montreal Park and Island Rail­
ways rolling stock taken over by the Montreal Street Railway in
1901. There is no further information whatsoever, but there is
some evidence that they might have been single track cars. They
were scrapped a few years later.
In 1904, M.S.R. built six double-truck cars, classified as Ice
Cars for M.P.& I.R. lines. What this means is not clear. They
were designated by letters, as were most work cars at that time.
Many of these old wooden cars survived to modern times in one form
or another.
J
3021
J
f1l-E1l-
d
i a!U_~.li.!L _________________________________________ R~~_!..ll
Renumbered
No.
_1=9<....:1=--4,--_ 6DT Ice Cars -M.S.R. 1904 (30-0)
D
E
G
J
K
L
3015
3020
3022
3023
3021
3024
Re Flat 1906-Trailer flat for poles 1914-s01d to C.R.H.A.
1963
Motor box car 1917 -retired 1936
To Stores Dept. for wheels 1904 -Flat 1924 -scrapped
1958
Re -wooden Dump Car 1906
Re Flat 1906-Motor box car 1917-Tool 1929-Brine 1947 –

scrapped 1957
Loco. for Term. line 1910 -scrapped 1946
One of the early Ice Cars, after having been rebuilt
into a flat car for transporting wheels,
Tool Car N0.3021, rebuilt from K, one of the Ice Cars
which were constructed in 1904 for M.P.& I.R. lines.
In 1906 two steel-frame ballast cars, designated s and T
(later 3018 and 3019) were built by the Locomotive and Machine Co.,
J40ntreal, These had a depressed hopper in the centre, with four
compartments, Hinged steel doors on the sides could be opened and
the stone or gravel deposited by gravity on each side of the track
as the car moved slowly along. In later years, the hoppers were
decked over and the cars used primarily for carrying ties, sand­
boxes, etc. Both were scrapped in 1957.
In 1907 and 1908 the real build-up of flat and dump cars commen­
ced. M.S.R. built twelve wooden flat cars, 34-9 long, having
low metal sides composed of four doors or flaps on each side. The
doors were hinged at the bottom and when dropped, the mater~l could
be shovelled out. Having run out of letters, this group was known
as the 25 class; Nos, 25 to 36. (Note: In 1914 all flat and dump
car numbers were changed by adding 3000 to the original number,)
No.
25 26 27
28 29 30 31 32 33
34
35 36 Renumbered
1214
3025
3026
3027
3028
3029
3030
3031
3032
3033
3034 3035
3036 12
Flat Cars -M.S,R. 1207-08 (34-9)
Wrecked in collision with Canadian Northern Locomotive,
1917
Used
as snow leveller 1910-1914
Rebuilt as centre cab locomotive 1915 -scrapped 1937
M.C.B.
couplers -classed as loco. on some records
M.C.B. couplers -classed as loco. on some records –
sorapped 1936
All scrapped in 1929 except as noted.
••••• lithe material was dumped too close to the tra Ck ••••
Note the short wing which pushed the material outwards as
the car moved forward.
Also in 1908, the Dominion Car Co. was
steel flat cars, known as the 50 class.
door on the side instead of at the back,
be directly against the rear of the cab.
doors instead of four.
Renumbered
commissioned to build ten
This group had the cab
thus allowing the body to
The sides had five flap
No. 1214 10 Flat Cars -Dom. Car. Co. 1208 C~2 1_0 }
50
3050 Converted to snow levellerlk 1928 -scrar.ped 1938 51
3051

*
1914 1959 52 3052

*
1928

1938 53
3053

snow grader 1945

1959 54 3054

snow levellerlk 1914

1959 55 3055

snow plow 1944

1959 56 3056

snow grader 1945

1959 57 3057

snow plow 1950

1959 58 3058
1938 59 3059

1938
(* also used as flat cars as occasions demanded)
During 1910 and 1911 the Montreal Tramways Cpmpany purchased 51
side dump car bodies from Dominion Car Co., numbered 60 to 110, later
3060-3110. These were a great advance over the flat cars for
rapid unloading. A lever-operated latch allowed the whole side to
drop, and the body was titled by means of a motor-driven longitu­
dinal shaft with rack and pinion. The fault was that the material
was dumped too close to the track. To overcome this, a short wing was
attached to the rear truck, which, when extended, pushed the
material outwards as the car moved forward~. The last six cars of
this series, Numbers 105-110 (3105-3110) were not equipped with
trucks, control, etc. and were never operated.
~an2ji~~Rai __ l __________________________________________________ Pa~_179
In 1931 Numbers 3089 and 3102 were converted to trailer flats
for carrying rails, -the latter scrapped in 1950 and the former in
1957. In 1950 Numbers 3096 and 3097 were converted into snow
plows. Of the remainder, 7 were scrapped in 1929, including the
six never used, twenty-three in 1936, nine in 1938 and ffight in 1950;
In the mid-1920s the Differential Steel Car Company, Findlay,
Ohio, developed a more sophistkated steel dump-car which found wide
acceptance in the United States. M.T.C. bought one in 1925, four
in 1928 and two more in 1929. These were the 3125 class (Nos.3125
to 3131). They were very efficient; the side rotated outward
forming an apron which deposited the load clear of the track. They
had a capacity of 60,000 lbe. compared with 40,000 lbs. for earlier
cars. Cabs were steel and painted red. These cars were active
until the end of tramway operation.
Differential Dump-oar, showing the method by which the
side rotated outward, depositing the load clear of the
traok.
~
.
Tt>
SECTlONS
T
AT
CROSSElEAlER
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End
SIUS

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—————–
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Base
GENERAL
DRAWING
SHOWING
MAIN
DIMENSIONS
~ a
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Can~dian_~~2~ _________________________________________________ ~~~_J~J_
Also in 1925, Canadian Car & Foundry Co. supplied six flat cars,
arranged for stake sides. Four cars were 34 feet long, Nos. 3150-
3153, with a capacity of 40,000 Ibs, and two, Nos.3160-3161, 43 ft.
long with a capacity of 46,000 Ibs. The latter were used for
transporting special trackwork pieces.
In 1929 Numbers 3150 and 3152 were converted to snow level1ers,­
the latter sold to Cornwall Street Railway in 1957. Nos. 3151 and 3153 rema1ned
until the end, -No. 3151 going to the C.R.H.A. Museum
in 1963. Nos. 3160 and 3161 were sold to Hydro-Quebec in 1957.
Summarizing the motor flat and dump cars, we find that by early
1929, eighty-three cars were on the roster.
1 Wooden Dump
2 Ballast & Flat
12 Flat, with sides
10 Flat, with sides
45 Steel Dump
7 Steel Dump
4 Stake side Flat
2 Stake side Flat
3023 (exJ)
3018-3019
3025-3036
3050-3059 3060-3104
3125-3131
3150-3153
3160-3161
:~tt,,.:.·
-…..
END AND SIDE VIEWS OF TRUCK
I



~—…–.



.~~-
.
..
Flat
Car
3018 was
originally
Ballast
Car
S.
It
is
shown
here
delivering
a
load
of
ties
to
Crane
W-l
during
reconstruction
of
trackage
near
St.Denis
Carhouse.
SEP 26 1925
NOTIOE TO lIEN IN CHA1!GE OF FREIGHT CARSI
It has been CIlstom8l7 in tlB paat to limit the
load on our freight oars oonsigned to points on the Upper Level
WIlStmount. to 28.000 1bs.
You will p1eass be advised that it is now permitted
to load these oars to the extent of eighteen tons or 36,000 1bs,
wh1011 limit III11st be striot1y adhered to and not exoeeded for any
reasono
Cars oonsigmd to any destination on the Upper Level
of Westmount must use Claremont avenue if ooming from the south
or Cote des Neiges ROad,frow Quean Mary Road to Westmount Blvd, if
oOming fr em the nor tho The use of Cote des Neiges Road or Guy
street!. between Sherbrooke and Westmount Boulevard. is striotly
prohibited for all freight oars, no mattsr what the size of the
load may be.
O6tait 1a ooutume dans 1e paas/! de limiter ~.
28.000 1bs un voyage sur nos ohars ~ fret. oonsign6 1I des endroits
dans 1a partie Hevte de Westmont (Upper Lflve1 Westmount)
Veuillez prendre avis qul1 est maintenmt parmis
de oharger 08S ohars jusqu~ oonourrenoe de 18 tomes, ou 36.000 lbtl.
Ces 11m1tes oepend!mt doivent @tre striotemeJ1o obserTtes et ne dOivent
pas @tre depasstes pour aUOMe oonsideration
Des ohars de fret oonal.gMs 1I nimport6 que11e desti­
nation dans 1a partie 4!levee de westmont. (Upper Level l1estmount).
doivent oiroulsr per Pa.venue Claremont si 08S ohars vie melt du
sud ou par le. Chemin de 1a Cote des Neiges, ~ partie du Chemin de
1a Reine Marie Jusquau Boulevard Westmont. 8i oes ohars viennent CIa
nordo.. nest striot ament defendu de paseer BUr 16 (themin de la Cot e
des Heiges ou Bur 1& rue Guy, entre la Nil S!J.arbrooke et 1& Boulevard
Westmont. quel1e ~u. so! t 1a pesenteur de 18 charge.
~plu-w
Suplt Trantiportation.

!,~_J..?±-_______________________________________ ~~~tiiillL..FaiL
All motor freight cars, and in fact, nearly all heavy work equip­
ment, were on special freight trucks manufactured by Montreal Steel
Works (Canadian Car & Foundry). This was a modified arch bar type
with no journal springs. There were two types; one with 4-8
wheelbase and outside hung motors, but the more common had a 6-6
wheelbase with inside hung motors.
In the 1920s the use of electric cars for delivering bulk ma­
terials for private customers declined, and thereafter the cars
were used primarily for the Companys construction and maintenance
work. Probably the last big project for the dump cars was carrying
excavated material to the riverfront along Lasalle Blvd., in the
City of Verdun, where on a temporary track, the cars discharged the
fill to reclaim a large strip of riverfront land. This is the area
from the Verdun Natatorium west to Crawford Park, where Lasalle
Boulevard formerly made a loop inwards through what are now the
grounds of Douglas Hospital.
A final moment of glory for the prosaic and utilitarian flat cars
occurred on August 31st, 1955, when Numbers 3153 and 3151 carried
M.S.R.s ancient horse-drawn sleigh and omnibus along St.Catherine
Street as part of the parade which marked the end of electric car
service on that thoroughfare. The historical items could not
travel under their own power but were proudly displayed to the on­
looking throngs from the flat decks of the pair of cleaned and
polished GREY CARS.

.
~.:~:,~~,
k,-: .>~,
,,
Building of M.T.C. s Garland Terminus in 1949 was one of
the last major uses for the Companys Construction ~p­
ment. No. 3054 is shown removing a load of excavated
material from the site.

Museum Train Gift to Museum
(?anadian National presented its Museum Train and five
vinta~e steam locomotives, including No. 40, a woodburner dating
back to 1872, to the Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa on
Friday, June 16. There was much huffing and chuffing as locomotive
6218, the only remaining operating CN steam locomotive, drew into
the Museum site with the old eqUipment. There to greet her were
members of the Historical Society of Ottawa in dress of a century
ago. Also on hand for the ceremony were Secretary of State Judy
LaMarsh, Transport Minister Pickersgill and N. J. MacMillan, CN
president, who presented the equipment to Miss LaMarsh. The HMCS
Carleton Band was in attendance to play appropriate music.
The locomotives and cars were placed on display to the
public following the presentation and all day Saturday, June 17.
tihen the Museum opens its doors in August they will form part of a
transport display expected to attract thousands of visitors from
Canada, the United States and other countries.
Museum and CN officials believe the collection will be
one of the finest on the North American continent. In addition to
the five locomotives and an 1859 coach, there is a dining car con­
structed in 1875; a sleeping car of 1904 vintage; a baggage car and
a combination baggage-passenger car of other early years. IIhile
train travel a century ago didnt have the comfort or speed of
modern transportation, the coaches had a splendor and dignity that
rivaled todays counterpart. Floral carpets covered the floors,
seats were richly upholstered and wooden panels heavily embossed.
Steam locomotive No. 40, the woodburner which must have
appeared impressive in 1872, is just a midget alongside the largest
of the steam engines in the collection –the 6400. This latter
engine was built in 1936 and was assigned to fast passenger service
between Hontreal and Toronto. This 4-8-4 pulled the Royal Train in
1939 when King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Canada. It
also appeared that year at the Worlds Fair in New York. Locomotive
No. 40 was built for the Grand Trunk Railway by the Portland Loco­
motive Ilorks. In its day the Grand Trunk was one of the five
largest railways on the North American continent. It introduced
the first mail cars, the first parlor cars and brought about the
first through bills of lading.
Locomotive No. 247 (an 0-6-0-T), was built in 1894, also
for the Grand Trunk. It was used for many years in yard service in
Montreal. It was saved from the scrap heap and became part of the
CNs Museum Train in 1953. About 1900 the Grand Trunk put into
service Locomotive No. 713, a 2-6-0 type engine. It was used on the
Maritime run and for branch line service.
In 1930, the fastest engine on wheels in the British
Commonwealth was Locomotive No. 5700, a 4-6-4. Equipped with 80-
inch drivers, it ran between Nontreal and Toronto at speeds well
over 100 miles per hour. Both the dining car, built in 1875, and
the sleeping car, constructed in 1904, were made for the Inter­
colonial Railway. Until a few months ago, they had been stored in
a roundhouse near Quebec City.
The cars of the Huseum Train are being restored to their
former beauty. The train has not been on display since the late
1950s.
One of the artifacts of particular interest in the train
is the original four-cylinder oil Beardmore engine which powered
self-propelled car No. 15820 on its record-breaking test run from
Montreal to Vancouver in 67 hours running time in 1925. It was from
this engine and test run that todays highly effioient self-pro­
pelled cars were later developed.
CN IS last operating steam looomotive, Northern 6218, steams into
the National J.tuseum of Sclenoe and Teohnology as part of the oere­
mony whlch sa …. CNs J.{useum Train turned over to the Museum. The Museum
Traln …. as well-reoeived a decade ago …. hen lt toured many
parts of Canada; lately, though, lt had been allowed to fall into
sad cbnditlon indeed. It is a source of joy to many ferroequlnolo­
gists toot CN has Been flt to assure that thls once-famous colleot-
10n of lnvaluable Canadian heritage will agaln recelve the lovlng
oare it deserves and that lt wl11 agaln be aval1able to publlc
view. Locomotive 6218 does not form part of the museum exhiblt and
…. 111 contlnue to operate on speolal CN excurslons for awhile yet.
)
CANADIAN NATIONAL
FP9As
RAILWAYS
By Murray W. Dean
William G. Blevins
d,954 the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors Corporation ,
LaGrange , Illinois , introduced a new model of ostensibly dual service dies­
el locomotive designated FP9A. These locomotives are a version of the
standard F9 freight locomotive, lengthened four feet in order to provide
adequate space for a steam generator and water tanks for passenger service.
There are four locomotives of this type in the United States ( built by EMD ) and
fifty-four in Canada ( built by General Motors Diesel Corporation, Lon­
don, Ontario) of which the Canadian National Railways bought forty-three
between 1954 and 1958. They carry road numbers 6500 to 6542 and classes
GPA-17a to GPA-17e. The original cost of each locomotive including 10%
sales tax , varied from $223,213 for the first order to $243,790 for the last
order.
. The locomotives are of the B-B wheel arrangement with four traction
motors and 40 inch diameter wheels on swing bolster trucks . The prime
mover in all the locomotives is one General Motors sixteen cylinder 567 C
V-type engine generating 1850 horsepower of which 1750 horsepower is avail­
able for traction. Units numbered 6514 to 6542 were built equipped with
multiple unit control connections on the front end while numbers 6500 to 6513
were so equipped in 1957 at a cost of $886 each .
The 6500s are used exclusively in passenger service and until recently
have all been assigned to the St. Lawrence Region for maintainance purposes
although they were ( and, indeed, still are ) regularly used on transcontin­
ental passenger trains. In May and June of 1967 , numbers 6500 to 6515
inclusive were reassigned to the Prairie Region . A
diagram is shown for class GPA-17e , numbers 6533 to 6542. The
locomotive weights shown on this diagram apply only to number 6542 and like
those given in the roster are the official weights reported to the Board of
Transport Commissioners in September of 1960. As a matter of interest
locomotive number 6500 has run 2,388,385 miles as of 31/05/67 while num­
ber 6542 has run 1,470,700 miles as of 31/05/67. Originally all the units
were given a top speed of 83 miles per hour but during 1963 the rating was
increased to 89 miles per hour due to a gear ratio change from 59:18 to
58:19 . In the autumn of 1965 prior to the inauguration of the Rapido service
between Montreal and Toronto, several units were equipped with the new
General Motors D-67 traction motors which allow a slight increase in the
maximum speed .
Numbers 6517 and 6608 were on train No.1 when it was in head-on
collision with train No. 404 , locomotives 4564 and 4583 , on 13 February , 1960
at M. P. 32 , Caramat Subdivision, between Leigh and Osawin , Ontario.
As a result number 6517 and the other three units were retired on 30 April,
1960. Number 6509 was removed from service on 19 September, 1966 and
was overhauled and repainted at Point St. Charles· shop for service on the
Confederation Train. At that time it had run 2, 197,400 miles and on 24 Oct­
ober , 1966 it was returned to its normal CNR passenger duties still under
number 6509. 28,600 miles later on 12 December, 1966 it joined CPR 1411 at
Point Sl Charles shop where it received a class 1 inspection and was re­
numbered 1967. Number 1967 and CPR 1411 (now 1867 ) left Point St. Charles
on 20 December , 1966 and proceded to Ottawa Ontario, where they part­
iCipated in the formal dedication ceremonies on i January , 1967, of the Con­
federation Train •
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
FP9As
GENERAL MOTORS DIESEL CORPORATION, LONDON, ONTARIO .
ROAD ORDER NUMBER
CLASS BUILT SERIAL NUMBER WEIGHT NOTES
6500
GPA-17a
01/10/54 A-630 C-183 256, 205
6501

28/10/54 A-631

256,441 6502

31/10/54 A-632

256,305
6503
II
14/11/54 A-633
II
256,590
6504

27/11/54 A-634
II
256, 743
6505
II
29/11/54 A-635
II
256, 225
6506
II
10/12/54 A-636
II
256,750 6507
II
18/12/54 A-637

256, 660 6508
II
29/12/54 A-638
II
255,935
6509
II
31/12/54 A-639
II
255,970 1
6510

12/01/55 A-640
II
256,690 6511
II
20/01/55 A-641

256,470
6512

28/01/55 A-642
II
255,570
6513 GPA-17b 21/02/55 A-764
II
255,860
6514 GPA-17c 16/01/57 A-1044 C-217 256,040
6515
II
22/01/57 A-1045
II
255,080
6516
II
30/01/57 A-1046
II
254,520
6517

12/02/57 A-1047
II
2 6518

21/02/57 A-1048
II
255, 180
6519
II
28/02/57 A-1049
II
256,300
6520
II
12/03/57 A-1050
II
257,280 6521
II
20/03/57 A-1051
II
256,500 6522
II
22/03/57 A-1052,
II
257,310
6523 GPA-17d 29/03/57 A-1195 C-230 256,960
6524
II
05/04/57 A-1196
II
256,720
652,5
II
12/04/57 A-1197
II
256,920
6526
II
24/04/57 A-1198
II
257,680
6527
II
30/04/57 A-1199
II
256,940
6528
II
07/05/57 A-1200

257, 140
6529
II
14/05/57
A-1201

256,900
6530

24/05/57 A-1202

257,500 6531

31/05/57
A-1203
II
257,600
6532
II
31/05/57 A-1204
II
257,000
6533 GPA-17e 14/05/58
A-1393 C-242 257,920
6534

23/05/58 A-1394

257,920
6535

29/05/58 A-1395

257,220
6536

06/06/58 A-1396
II
257,240
6537

17/06/58 A-1397

257,220 6538

27/06/58 A-13.98
II
257,020
6539
II
09/07/58 A-1399

257,260
6540
II
16/07/58 A-1400

256,860 6541

16/07/58
A-1401
II
256,880
6542

18/07/58 A-1402
II
258, 160
NOTES:
1. Number 6509 to Confederation Train as Number 1967 in 1966.
2. Number 6517 in collision 13/02/60 , retired 30/04/60.
OI[5[L [N~IN[: 1750 n.f.
G.M. 567C V_t)pC1
16 oyllndor ai· DOTe, 10 Stroko
835 R.P.M. Full Spoed
275 R.P.M.
Idling
r;==o—
1~9o-
~.~H
~ ~ : j r
DIESEL UNIT DATA BOOK
<0533
GPA-7e To CO S~2.
CI..AH NUMBERS
WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION BUILD[R G.H.
I rR.MIN IREAR MIN·I TOTAL I FR.MAX.IREARMAXI TOTAL ORDER N C-212
LIGHT [111089 J 119390 [231680 11l29 1121401 I 232980 MODEL Na. FP-9a
LOADEO 1128119 I 127540 1,56060 1129909 1129551 1253160 DATE BUILT 1958
1–01—
43,0: ——–____ +-_–
-~9..11 .. –_ _+_——34·-0.. 8-6~ t8r
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LUBRICATING OIL L6? ~P. GAL.
fUEL OIL IMP. CoAL. JOURNALS: TYP[ .. StH AlA COMPRESSOR
TRUCIS
OPERATING FEATURES
Swing Bolster
MA)(. SPtEl) 69 M.P.H
GtAR RAT:O

T.E. ..HARTING AIR 8R.AK[
T.L CONTINUOUS jClOC} lb–
0/01. CURVE ALONE: COUPLEO:
West1nghouse 24 HL
TRACTl9N .MOTORS
G .Y. D-i7-B
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POUR -Reliance
MAIN GENtRATOR
a.M. D-12-8
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C.M. A-8102-A2 10
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DYNAMIC BRAKE
no
Canadian National 6503 displays its clean lines at Oakville
Ont. on 8 April, 1961. (Photo by R. Post, colI. of W. R. Linley)
Canadian National 6538 heads Train G, the morning CP-CN
pool train from Montreal to Toronto at Coteau Que. on
1 April, 1964. Shortly thereafter 6538 received CNs ne,
image paint scheme. (Photo by W. R. Linley)
Canadian National 6541 on
Train 27 at Morrisburg Ont. on
16 August 1965. CNs practice of mounting the bell on the
cab roof o! passenger and freight A-units is ably demonstrated
in this Photograph. The normalpositlon of the bell on such
locomotives is near the front truck· under the pilot where it
unfortunately is susceptible to being clogged with snow.
(Photo by W. R. Linley)
The Gothic towers of the Chateau Laurier Hotel loom in the background
as Train 2, the Super Continental {led by CN 6514 ,
pIcks its Jay out from under Ule train shed a the old Ottawa
Union Station in this July 1966 ~scene. (Photo by W. R. Linley)
~ …
Canadian NatiCmal 6520 and 4118 at Federal Ont. approaching
Ottawa with Train 104 in March 1966. (Photo by W. R. Linley)
Canadian National 6532
WiUl Train 34 , the By towner , prepares
to leave Ottawa ~fol Montreal on Sunday, 31 July, 1966, the
first day of operation of the new 6. 5 mllllon dollar Ottawa
Station. (Photo by W. R. Linley)
This month Canadian Hail contains the first of a series of
artioles about various locomotive types. The article is a stan­
dard and will follow this form in the future. The order of the
first articles will be as follows: (1) CN FP9As. (2) CP FP9As.
(3) CP FP7As. (4) CN FPA2s and FPA4s. (5) CP FPA2s and E8As.
(6) CN F3As and F7As. (7) CN FA1s and FA2s. (8) CP FA1s and
FA2s. (9) CN CLC Passenger A units. (10) CN-C-liners. (11) CP
C-liners. Any person who has good photos of these locomotives,
preferably in service, is invited to send in a high contrast 5×7
black and white print for possible publication, with as many of the
following details as are available; (1) Road numbers of all the
locomotives in the consist. (2) Train number and arrival anddep­
arture points. (3) Location where photo was taken. (4) Date and
exact time of day that the photo was taken (specifying standard or
dayl1ght time).
ERRATUM
1) CN 3229 -3240 have serials M~3478-01 to M-3478-12, not M-3477-8
to M-3477-19 as previously stated.
2) CPR Miscellaneous (3) in #189 stated that CP 4061 to 4075 had
had their top speed changed. This should not have applied to
units 4064 and 4065, but should include unit 4041. 8511 and
8512 were shown as having their top speeds changed from 65 to 89 mph.
This should have been from 89 to 65 mph. _The correspond­
ing gear ratios are, of course, back to front as well.
Retirements: up to
ROAD SERIAL
NUMBER
4800
A-534 4808 A-542 9406 77301 Main Gen. 2432821
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
June 30, 1967.
BUILDER BUILT
GMD 31/08/53
GMD 30/
0
9/53
MLW 25/05/50
GE 1958
RETIRED
23/06/67 23/06/67
22/06/67
17/01/67
NOTES
1
1
2
3
1) Train 423 collided with a rockslide at MP 40.7 of the Skeena
Subdivision on 6 February 1967.
2) This unit is not trade-in material (yet).
3) Surplus to requirements.
The following locomotives, mentioned previously as being con­
sidered for retirement, have been rejected for this purpose: 775,
776, 777, 1646, 1659.
Pa~JJj __________________________________________________ ~e~gL~~~aiL
Locomotive Transfers: up to June 30, 1967.
ROAD NUMBERS
3887 6509 6511
to 6515
6611
to 6615 0103 0109
D206
0302
0452
8192
to 8193
TRANSFERRED FRO~l
St. Lawrence Rgn.
St. Lawrence Rgn.
St. Lawrence Rgn.
St. Lawrence Rgn.
Atlantic Rgn.
Atlantic Rgn.
St. Lawrence Rgn.
Great Lakes Rgn.
Prairie Rgn.
Great Lakes Rgn.
Rentals: up to June 30, 1967.
ROAD
NU~IBER
BLE 719B
BLE ?20A
DMI 139
DMI 143
DMI 149
DMI 152
DMI 154
DMI 155
DMI 156
DMI 157
DMI 158
DMI 163
DMI 171
N&W 3726
SERIAL
16602
16592 23919
23923 23929 23932
2393
4
23935 23936
23937 24487 25263
25271
BUILT
06/52 06/52
02/58
03/58
03/58
03/58
03/58 03/58
04/58
04/58 04/58
04/59
04/59
BUILDERIS
MODEL
F7B
F7A
SD9R
SD9R SD9R
SD9R
SD9R SD9R
SD9R
SD9R
SD9R
SD9
SD9
TRANSFERRED TO
Great Lakes Rgn.
Prairie Rgn.
Prairie Rgn.
Prairie Rgn.
Great Lakes Rgn.
St. Lawrence Hgn
Mountain Rgn.
Atlantic Rgn.
Atlantic Rgn.
Prairie Rgn.
RAILWAY BUILDER
CLASS
(~-I.j-B2
~-4-A2
RS-3
RS-3 RS-3 RS-3
RS-3 RS-3 RS-3
flS-3 RS-3
Rs-4
Rs-4
EMD
EMD EMD
EMD EMD EMD
EMD
EMD
EMD
Ef1D
EMD
EMD
EMD
DATE
06/06/67
06/06/67
06/06/67
06/06/67 01/06/67
01/06/67
27/06/67
01/06/67 01/06/67
01/06/67
LEASED
03/06/67 03/06/67
22/06/67
13/06/67
12/06/67
12/06/67
12/06/67
29/04/67
13/06/67
13/06/67
29/04/67 22/06/67
22/06/67
All units have been assigned to the Prairie Region except N&vl
3726 which is operating on the Great Lakes Region.
Purchases: up to July 21, 1967.
The first of CNs second order of SD40
l
s will be delivered be­
tueen October and December 1967. with the remaining 50 arriving
between January and July of 1968. Road numbers will extend from 5008
to 5075. The C-630
s
will carry road numbers 2002 to 2043.
16 of these will arrive in November and December of this y~3r,
while the remaining 26 come between January and April (not March as
stated in #189) of 1968.
Scrappings: up to July 21, 1967.
Locomotives 1612, 1630. and 1633 were turned over to the
sorapyard at Moncton for disposal on 04/07/67, 30/06/67, and
05/07/67 respectively. 9303 was scrapped at London on 24/11/66
while 9320 was dismantled at Point St. Charles on 10/04/67.
Sales: up to July 21, 1967.
Locomotive 9344 was sold to the CPR on 6 July 1967 under the
following terms of sale: the locomotive is to include the main
frame and carbody, complete with electrical components -the
trucks, engine complete with crankshafts, and main generator are to
be removed and returned to the CNR on a flatcar. A second CLC cyl­
inder block was included on the same order. The locomotive is pre­
sumably to be used for spare parts. 9344 arrived in St. Luc on
07/07/67 and left for Ogden at 06:00 on the westbound way freight
on 13/07/67.
Miscellaneous: up to July 21, 1967.
1) CN Northern 6167 was donated to the City of Guelph, Ontario,
through Mayor Ralph oj. Smith, on 30 June 1967.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Purchases: up to July 21, 1967.
CPR has purchased the remains of one CNR retired CLC freight
A unit #9344, presumably for spare parts. Further data on the
locomotive can be found under CNR Sales in this issue of Canad­
ian Rail.
Rentals: up to July 21, 1967.
B&M switchers were returned by CPR to B&M on 23 February 1967.
The remaining DMI units, as well as the CGH equipment, were return­
ed to their respective owners in March. B&M road switchers came
into Montreal St.Luc yard and left for home via Newport as follows:
ROAD
NUMBER
1511
1535 1536
15
40 1556 1557
1558 1559 1561
1573 1574
1575
1576 1577
DATE
ARRIVED
27/05/67
29/05/67 29/05/67
29/05/67
31/05/67
27/05/67
01/06/67
27/05/67
31/05/67
29/05/67
31/05/67
29/05/67
31/05/67
01/06/67
lRAIN
ARRIVED
97
4
Glen Glen
Glen
974 974
974 974 952
Glen
974
Glen
952 974
DATE
DEPARTED
11/06/67
11/06/67
11/06/67
11/06/67 16/06/67 15/06/67
17/06/67 11/06/67
16/06/67
15/06/67 15/06/67 16/06/67
15/06/67
16/06/67
TRAIN
DEPARTED
904 904 904
904 904 916
904 904 904
916 916 904
916 904
P~_J22 __________________________________________________ ~~E~ji~~_B~il
Equ1pment wh1ch was brought from the Glen had been stored
serv1ceable there for some t1me prev10us (some s1nce as far back
as the end of February). The BLE equ1pment 1s presently arr1v1ng
at St. Luc for serv1c1ng pr10r to homeward sh1pp1ng wh1ch should be
complete by the end of July. Th1s w1ll leave CP w1th no leased
un1ts whatsoever.
MONTREAL LOCOMOTIVE WORKS
Ind1an State Ra1lways: up to July 18, 1967.
The new de11very schedule for these locomot1ves 1s as follows:
September -10. October -10, November and December -12.
Spruce Falls Power and Paper: up to July 18, 1967.
#108
was outshopped 14 July 1967 for sh1pp1ng v1a CNR and ONR.
The locomot1ve left CN Montreal Yard on 16 July 1967.
A gaily costumed quintet tries out a rail jigger car at Peterborough.
Notes
and News
t1n interesting transit experiment is to be undertaken by the Toronto
Transit Commission during the ooming few months. Information on
the soheme, obtained from the TTC pamphlet Headlight, was sent to
us by Howard Lee, who reports:
An experiment has been set in motion which may lead to the oom­
plete modernization of the TTCs fleet of 153 trolley buses. In
the first step of the program, oontraots have been awarded for the
construotion of 2 prototype renovated trolley buses. The modern­
ization programme involves the use of existing trolley bus traotion
motors, control equipment and some other oomponents whioh are in
good oondition. This equipment will be overhauled by TTC men and
installed in new, modern trolley coach bodies by the oontraotors.
Preliminary indioations are that this combination will provide a
transit vehicle comparable to a new vehicle in appearanoe Passenger
oomfort and performanoe and that with a full-soale program the oost
will be substantially lower than new vehiole costs. Chief influ­
enoing factors were: trolley buses cost about $800.00 a year less
to operate than diesel buses in Toronto; the expanding subway sys­
tem will ensure the continuation of ample low-oost electric power; and
conoern about the ever-mounting problem of diesel exhaust fumes and
air pollution.
Northern Rangerll, the oldest ship in CNs Newfoundland Coastal op­
erations, has been withdrawn from service and is now being held
pending disposition. The vessel was built in 1936 by Fleming and
Ferguson of Sootland. Meanwhile, the Frederiok Carter was laun­
ohed in June. This ship will carry standard gauge freight equip­
ment between Port aUX Basques and North Sydney, N.S. (From C.S.
Steeves, who correots a minor error qn page 114. Aotually,No. 920 was
the shunter and No. 912 was the leading unit on Train 203).
After twelve years of dead storage at Rail City Museum in northern
New York State, Grand River Railway interurban oombination car 797
is being moved to a more permanent home at the Seashore Trolley Mu­
seum, Kennebunk, Maine. Its motors will be re-installed and it
will ~perate as a live exhibit.
~ Jigger Races
ll
are making news this summer at Peterborough, Ont.,
and drawing railway buffs from many oentres, aooording to Centen­
nial, a publication of the Ontario Dept. of Tourism & Information.
A summer-long series of raoes, using ten of these musole-powered
rail cars has been arranged by the Peterborough Lions Club. Old
handcars, weighing in the vioinity of 700 pounds apiece and with a
oruising speed of about 25 miles per hour, are propelled by four
man teams, eaoh attempting to oover a given distance in the short~
possible time. Locale of the contests is on an unused three-mile
stretoh of Canadian National Railways traok along the Trent Canal
near Lakefield, Onto
Page_lJ~ __________________________________________________ ~~E~ji~~_B2iL
The last of the Boston and Maine Railroad Corporations Passenger
trains were discontinued effective June 30, 1967. The last two
services were the round trips formerly operated between Boston and Concord, and
between Boston and Dover, N.H. The only Passenger
trains operated after June 30th are those under contract for the
Massachussetts Bay Transportation Authority. (info. J.Beatty)
Despite B t M opinion, it would appear that Montreal-New York City
rail Passenger service is not dead. On Monday evening, May 29th
the Delaware and Hudsons southbound IIMontreal Limited consistai
of a near-record twenty-two cars. The occasion was the final
evening of the U.S. Memorial Day Weekend, and the added attraotion
of EXPO 67. Geoffrey Southwood reports the oonsist of this train
as follows: D&H 1500 hp diesels 4023, 4009, 4022,
D&H baggage oar 443
ATSF sleepers Regal Lark, Regal Ruby, Regal Gorge,
Regal Crown, Regal Dome
U.P. sleepers Pacifio Bend, Pacifio View,
Pacifio Crusader, Paoific Bay,
Paoifio Ridge N.Y.C.
sleepers Cherry Valley, Port of Albany,
Port of Lewiston, Ausable River
D&H ooaches 204 205
N. Y.C. cOaches 30513, 2624, 2615, 2633. 2607.
The
final segment of the onoe-popular CN-CV Montreal-Boston/ New
York Passenger trains (The Washingtonian -The Montrealer -The Am­
bassador, etc.) was abandoned August 16th last. This was the Mon­
treal -Cantic, Que., daily round trip of the unOfficially-named,
IICanticonian, operated since the demise of The Washingtonianll by a
single RDC unit. There is now no servioe on the St. Johns line of
the CN south of Cannon Junction.
Also abandoned at August 31st were the four round trips of the looal
commuter trains between Montreal, Eastern Junction and Mbntreal Nord. Somewhat
redundant since the opening of the Montreal Metro line to
the north end of the City, the trains were canoelled effeotive on September
1st.
Canadian National Railways has also been authorized to discontinue
Passenger train servioes provided by mixed trains running east of
Charlottetown, P.E.I., it was announced late last July. The Board
of Transport Commissioners released orders giving CN permission to
close down Passenger operations on the following runs:
Charlottetown -Murray Harbour -Hazelbrook -Vernon.
Charlottetown -Souris -Elmira.
Charlottetown -Georgetown -Montague.
Services have been provided on these lines on a Winter Onlyll basts
for a number of years.
With Albertas cOat-of-arms banner fluttering at the front of CN
diesel 4351, a five-oar train, oarrying Premier Manning and A.R.R.
officers travelled 81 miles along the Partly-completed Alberta
Resources Ry. route which eventually will link the C.N. mainline
with Grande Prairie. The date was August 2nd, and it was the
first train to use a stretoh of A.R.R. traok. After a four-hour
trip, the official party reaohed the end of steel. Mr. Manning
oontinued along the remainder of the 235 mile route by helioopter.
CaE22jan_B2i~ _________________________________________________ ~~~_L~~
From the Hamilton Spectator, courtesy of W. F. McDermott, comes the
following interesting item, which will be of interest to many of
our readers:
Shes big and beautiful and shiny.
Shes 55 years old but still the glamour girl of the Steloo
stable.
Shes No.40, Hamiltons last iron horse still ih harness.
The Montreal Locomotive Works turned out the 0-6-0 switcher during
1912. She worked looal rails in Hamilton for the Toronto,Hamilton
and Buffalo Ry. for 37 years before Stelco bought the engine for ser­
vice in its mill yard in 1949. That was the same year Steloo pur­
ohased its first diesel. One by one, Steloos steamers rattled down
the one-way traok to the scrap heap. Diesel looomotives replaoed
them all –except No.40. She
towers above the diesels, fourteen feet four inches from traok
to stack. No.40 is 594 long, 911 wide, and with loaded tender
weighs 139 tons.
Painted, polished and maintained by oar-repair fbremanGord.Douglas,
the steamer puts in most of her time in the locomotive shop, but she
rolls out to any Part of the hugh steel-making co~~lex whenever ex­
tra steam pressure is required.
And when the diesels need some extra muscle, they olear the traoks
for No.40.
HITCH-HIK ER
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
Can I put my car there and go to sleep in the back seat? Ive got to be in Toronto ill the
morning and I dont feel like driving all night.
CA}~ADIAN RAIL: Published monthly (except July /Aup,ust combined) by
the Publications Co~ittee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Subscription includes Associate Membership: $4.00 annually.
PLBLICATIONS COm:ITTEE:
E::JITOR, CANADIA}) RAIL:
ASSOCIATE EDITOR:
NEdS EDITOR:
ILKBERSIUP EDITOR:
POHER EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
MJ.,.1BERSlIIP C1IAIru~AN:
D.H. Henderson, Chairman
Anthony Clec;g
William Pharoah
1illiam Pharoah
Anthony Cler.e
Derek Booth
Derek Boles
!·1urray Dean
John VI. Saunders
J. A. !3eatty
ASSOCIATION REPRESEnTATIVES:
We hope you wi II visit
exp067 {tr~
MONTREAL ~ M-V-[)
APR.2B -OCT. 27.19B7
OTTAWA VALLEY I Kenneth F. Chivers, Apt. 3, 67 Somerset st. W., Ottawa, Ont.
PACIFIC COAST: Peter Cox, 2936 W. 28th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
SASKATCIlliWA}: J.S. Nicolson, 2306 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Sask.
ROCKY MOUl~TAn!1 V.I-. Coley, 11243-72nd Ave., Edmonton, Alta.
FAR EASTs W.D. McKeown, 900 Senriyama (Oaza), Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: John H. Sandero, 67 l1illoH lay, Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyright 1967
Printed in Canada on
Canadian paper

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