Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 189 1967

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 189 1967

_il-……. II ……. D.
m~nn
No.189 June 1967

~A CBHA~
C@ M:lLBSTONB ~
info from E.M. Johnson
Ii) e
G
= §:.
~ !, ur cover photograph and the two pictures on the opposite
page record a truly historic event for the Canadian Railroad His­
torical Association –the first operation of a museum locomotive
under steam. This very worthy centennial activity has been carried
out by our EDMONTON CHAPTER, notwithstanding very limited material
resources.
As mentioned in an earlier Canadian Rail, Northern
Alberta 2-8-0 No. 73 was moved outside of the Cromdale carbarns of
the Edmonton Transit System before Christmas 1966, but this was by
filling the boiler with air pressure at 100 pounds per inch
squared. This provided sufficient energy to move the locomotive
in and out of the barns and served as a cold test of the restored
engines pipes and valves.
Recently, the Edmonton Chapter obtained an Alberta Pro­
vincial boiler inspection certificate and the engine was steamed
for the first time since being donated to the Association, on April
29. The accompanying photos were taken on April 30. The engine
is in fine condition and reflects great credit on the Edmonton
team, led by Harold Maw, which has worked long and hard on the
restoration project.
One stall of the Cromdale carbarns, now used for buses,
has been made available to the C.R.H.A. and houses Edmonton street­
car No. I, Locomotive No. 73, and other smaller items such as
handcars. The carbarns are located immediately alongside the CNs
main line leading to the downtown passenger station and are served
by a railway spur. Edmonton Chapter members extended this spur and
laid a switch to provide access to their stall. A paved area at
the end of the barns is crossed by prefabricated track sections -­
full scale snap track –which are piled out of the way of Edmon­
ton Transit System operations when not in use.
Congratulations, Edmonton members.
locomotives may be small, but it is all in
shape with certificates to prove it.
Your roster of steam
top notch operating
The U. S. S.R. booklet IN ADDITION TO WAGES di stri buted at the
Soviet Pavillion at Expo 67, contains an interesting Russian
transit note: A Metro ticket costs five kopecks and is good
for all lines. It costs five kopecks on a bus ••••• and three
kopecks on a tram. In NOrth Ameri ca, the average MetroTSU6= way)
ticket costs 25¢ ••• say, five nickels. It costs an av­
erage of five nickels on a bus. Would it have cost only ~ee
nickels on-a-tram??? if Canadian municipalities had retained
their trams instead of replacing them by buses???
123
Getting There
Was Half The Fun
Being an Account of an Ingenious method
of circumventing a natural obstacle
5.S. Worthen
~e burgers of Boston had had it in for the proprietors of
~portland, Maine, ever since the Atlantic & St. Lawrence joined
the St. Lawrence and Atlantic, thus establishing a broad-gauge
highway from the River to the Sea. This aggrivation was only in­
creased when the Grand Trunk leased the line, connected it with
Quebec City, and then crossed the St. Lawrence to Montreal, in 1859.
The stimulus which set the Vermont Central Railroad Com­
pany up and over the Green Mountains in 1848 was properly Bostonian.
The wiley burge rs had an eye on the Montreal-Great Lake s traffic,
over a railroad which wo.uld be, of course, cantrolled by other mem­
bers of the commercial society of Boston. Once this had been ac­
complished, they would be, once and for all, rid of the malevolant
influence of the Grand Trunk, the Erie and the growing New York
Central Railroad.
A ~r passenger train ran between White River Junction
and Bethel on June 26, 1847. The railroad was officially opened on
February 13, 1849 to Windsor, Vt. It ftrally reached Essex Junction,
near Burlington Vt., on December 31, 1849. But it was still one
hundred miles (and one river, The Richelieu) away from Montreal.
To be more precise, it was some seventy miles (and one river) short
of the nearest railway, a standard gauge effort at St. Johns, Que.,
called the Champlain and St. Lawrence Railroad.
Elsewhere, it has been recorded how the Champlain and St.
Lawrence came over to St. Johns on the 4 foot 8}, with a whoop and
a holler, in 1836. Here, on the banks of the Richelieu, it lan­
guished for a.bout ten years, while the side-wheelers on Lake
Champlain carried the traffic to Burlington, Vt., and Plattsburg and
Whitehall N.Y., to the waiting arms of the Ruthland and Burlington,
on the Saratoga and Washington. But not, unfortunately, onto the
metals of the Vermont Central, whose nearest point to Burlington,
and interconnected to it by a spur, was at Essex Junction. Now this
was a situation which could not be tolerated.
Additional indignities were beaped on the head of the
Vermont Central when, in 1851, the Champlain and St. Lawrence ex­
tended its line to Rouses Point N.Y., and a junction with the
Northern Railroad of New York, whose main line wound away to the
west, and Ogdensburgh, N.Y., on the upper, smoother reaches of the
St. Lawrence, just east of Lake Ontario. From 1851 until the Grand
Trunk Railway was opened through eastern Ontario in 1857. this was
the preferred route for those travelling from l>1ontreal to towns in
Ontario.
Meanwhile, in 1847, the Montreal and Lachine Railway had
been completed, and in 1852 the Lake St. Louis and Province Line
Railroad had managed to make a start from Caughnawaga, opposite
Lachine, to the international boundary near Mooers, N.Y., where it
made a very opportune junction with the Northern Railroad of New
York, aforementioned. This was the connection that finally broke
CANADIAN 125 R A I L
the camels back and forced the amalgamat10n of the Champla1n and
St.Lawrence and the Montreal and Lach1ne, under the corporate t1tle
of the Montreal and Champla1n Ra1lroad Oompany, 1n 1857.
Now th1s does not mean that the Vermont CenUrel was stand-
1ng 1dly by wh1le all th1s hoorah was tak1ng place. W1th the advent
of the Champla1n and St.Lawrence 1n Rouses Po1nt, the only natural
barr1er to an end-on connect1on w1th 1t was the R1che11eu River, -­
that and M1ss1ssquo1 Bay and some 45 m1les of Vermont Landscape,
wh1ch was far from level, and had some very awkward ups and downs 1n
1t. A survey of a route from Bur11ngton to the State l1ne 1n the
Town of H1ghgate was made 1n 1848, a charter for wh1ch (The Vermont
and Canada Ra11road Company) had been granted as early as 1845.
The extens10n from Essex Junct10n to St. Albans was completed on
October 17, 1850 and the last 11nk, through Swanton, over M1ss1ss­
quo1 Bay, through Alburgh to the Riche11eu, and over 1t to Rouses
Po1nt, N.Y., was completed on the glor1ous f1rst of June, 1851.
Th1s 1s a rather long preface to a descr1pt1on of the
actual method by wh1ch the Vermont and Canada -Vermont Central
crossed the one m11e of R1che11eu Bay on Lake Champla1n, to a junc­
t10n w1th the Northern Ra11road of New York and the Champla1n and
St. Lawrence, for St. Johns and Montreal, and for Ch1rubusco, North
Lawrence, Malone, Ogdensburgh and po1nts west.
The R1che11eu had always been a nav1gable r1ver. Or1g1-
nally for canoes, later for long-boats, canoes, Durham boats,
sloops, H1s and Her Majestys sh1ps and 1n 1850 Uncle Sams side­
wheelers for Lak~ Champla1n. Of course, th1s 1mmed1ately e11m1nated
the poss1b1l1ty of a so11d p11e trestle across the m1le-w1de bay,
but 1ngenu1ty preva1led, and 1n 1851, a remarkable structure was
la1d across the bosom of the bay. It is reported 1n the follow1ng
f detail 1n Moores New England V1ews, pub11shed by H.P. Moore 1n
1861:
But the place (R1che11eu Bay) 1s one of more 1mmeiliate interest
to the tour1st or traveller, on account of the remarkable
ra11way connect1on, wh1ch, by the exerc1se of extraord1nary
enterpr1se, mechan1cal 1ngenu1ty and perseverance, has been
here effected between the Vermont and Canada and the Ogdensburgh
Ra11roads, and by wh1ch, not only those two 1mportant 11nes,
but the two States of Vermont and New York, before access1ble
to each other for a hundred miles along their borders only by
water craft, have become connected by an unbroken line of ra11s
extend1ng over br1dge and br1dge-boat, a m11e across the lake,
as very accurately exh1b1ted, together w1th a port1on of the
surrounding lake scenery, 1n the accompany1ng view, taken a
short distance 1n front of the ra11road stat1on, on the Vermont
s1de of the lake.
Th1s br1dge 1n 1ts whole length 1s 5,290 feet
z
or one m11e and
two rods, and was erected at a total cost of ~60,000, of which
about $20,000 were expended on the draw, or as it 1s usually
and perhaps more properly called the Boat Br1dge. Three-f1fths
of the whole structure, 1ncluding the Boat Br1dge, were built
by the Vermont and Canada and the Vermont Central, and the
rema1n1ng two-f1fths by the Ogdensburgh Ra11road. The Boat
Br1dge, or that part wh1ch sw1ngs open to perm1t the passage
of vessels, and 1s thus made to serve the purposes of a huge
draw, 1s of the grea~ length of 301 feet, and 1s an ent1rely
CANADIAN 126 R A I L
A very early view of the Floatinp, Bridee across Richelieu Bay, Lake
Champlain, showing
the construction of the Vermont &. Canadas connecting
b
ridge to Rouses Point and the Montreal & Champlain Railroad.
–Courtesy of the Vermont Historical Society.
independent structure, -in fact, a regular boat, with iron
rails running over its deck and so brought to the level and
line of the adjoining bridge and track at the ends, by sub­
stantial and secure fastenings, that the whole line of rails
from one side of the lake to the other. In a side-hold of this
boat was placed a small steam engine, which, by winding up on a drum a
strong iron chain passing to one end of the boat, and
trunce to a pier, will in the space of one minute throw out the
boat at right angles and, in another, after the vessel has
passed through, by reversing the revolutions of the drum,
bring it back to its place.
This novel contrivance, the only one of its kind ever invented,
or at least the only one ever put in operation, it is believed,
was at first the offspring of a necessity. The legislatures
of Vermont and New York, jealous of the rights of the people
naVigating the Lake, refused at that time to grant the privi­
lege of bridging the Lake, except on the condition that 300
feet in width of the channel be left open, or be made to be
opened, for the passage of vessels. No drawbridge could be
constructed to open to such an extent; and hence arose the
great desideratum of some contrivance to insure a continuous
line of rails across the lake, so as to obviate the damaging
necessity of breaking up trains on the Lake shores, and resort­
ing to ferry-boats for the transit of passengers and freight.
(Oh, delicious prose! Author)
And that desideratum was, after some experimenting, at length
fully realized in the construction of the present Boat Bridge,
which has now been for about ten years in su~ssful operation,
having during the whole time led to no accident and no impor­
tant detention of the trains. This invention, -for such it
CANADIAN 127 R A I L
truly was, mainly originated in the active brain of Henry R.
Campbell, the noted master bridge-builder of the Vermont Cen­
tral and Vermont and Canada line of railroads, who, acting on
the suggestion of the late Governor Paine of the possibil1 ty
of constructing some floating craft into which the cars could
be run and thus passed over the unbridged part of the lake,
went to work, perfected and put in operation the remarkable
contrivance which has so often elicited the surprise and ad­
miration of the visiting tourist. And few who carefully in­
spect its simple but efficient machinery, and witness the fa­
cility and exactness of its working, will fail to pronounce it
an achievement which does honor to the projector.
The Henry R. Campbell referred to above, was the engineer
who surveyed the original line, in 1848. Having got to the shores
of Richelieu Bay, it cectainly behooved him to find a way of getting
across ~
The history of the Boat Bridge was not altogether without
accident. Apart from the normal wear-and-tear of the water on the
wooden structure, the ice which formed on the Lake in winter raised
the dickens. After a few winters of resistance to the grinding,
crushing action of the frozen mass, the timbers in the permanent
portions were due for renewal. The floating portions were frequent­
ly raised or thrust out of line, which necessitated a great deal of
chopping and shovelling in order to realign them to permit train
On July 13th, 1947, Train 65 of the Rutland Railroad proceeds at
a cautious 10 mph over the trestle to Rouses Point, New York, from
the Vermont shore and Alburgh. –Collection of the late E.A.Toohey.
CANADIAN 128 R A I L
operation. In 1871, part of the trestle collapsed under Rutland
Railroad engine N.L. Davis and train. The Rutland had by this
time fought its way to a junction at Rouses Point with the Grand
Trunk and Ogdensburgh and Lake Champlain. In the spring (April 2)
of 1920, after the Boat Bridge had been converted to the more con­
ventional trestle plus swing span, there was a proper mess~ Rutland
Mikado No. 33 and freight train were proceeding from the Vermont
shore to Rouses Point, N.Y., when the engine jumped the track and
fell into the icy waters of the Bay. The annual ice-shove had
pushed the track out of alignment. It required the services of the
big hooks of the Delaware and Hudson and Boston and Maine to lift
the 2-8-2 out of the mud. The Rutlands crane took care of the
tender.
In its late life, the trestle was owned by the Central
Vermont (inherited from the Vermont and Canadas and Vermont Cen­
trals three fifths) and ~tained by the Ru~ (from the Northern
Railroads two-fifths via the Ogdensburgh & Lake Champlain). After
the Rutland wound things up in 1963, there really was no reason for
the Central Vermont to maintain this section between East Alburgh
and Rouses Point, and so the tracks, swin~ span and trestle work
were all removed in 1964. The Town of Rouses Point still maintains
a hundred feet or so of the old trestle as a sort of fishing pier
cum marina. Thus ended Mr. Campbells marvellous invention -or
its offspring, -depending on how you like to look at it.
an
Information concerning the photograph of GTR 377 pictured on
Page 246 of the December, 1966, issue has been supplied by Messrs.
C. Warren Anderson of Sussex, N.B., R.Corley of Peterborough, Ont.,
E. H. Heath of Cornwall, Ont., and Denis Latour of Dorval, Que.
It appears that this view was taken at Richmond, Que. in the
1890s. Upon the date photographed, however, hangs the identity
of the locomotive for as Mr. Corley points out, the G.T.R. had three
engines numbered 377 at various times. One, built by Portland in
May, 1873 carried the number 377 until 1898 when it was renumbered
100. It was sold to the United Counties Ry. in Nov. 1899. An­
other, built by Manchester in May 1883 was originally Midland 44,
became GTR 640 and renumbered 377 in 1898. Again renumbered in
1904 as 252, it was scrapped in May 1914 carrying number 2061 which
it received in 1910. A third locomotive received the number 377
in 1904 and was scrapped bearing this deSignation in September,
1909. It had been built by Partland in October 1873 as GTR 249,
became Second 264 in 1893, 329 in 1898 and 377 in 1904.
Mr. Anderson provides us with further data on GTRs First 377,as
follows: Constructed by the Portland Locomotive Companr, in 1873;
construction number 251; it had 66 driving wheels and 16 x24 cyl­
inders.
Mr. Corley believes, however, that the engine photographed was
the Manchester-built machine, GTRs Second 377, which would date
the picture between 1898 and 1904.
r
by Derek Booth
The Confederation Train may not disappear at
the end of 1967 but may, like many other centennial projects ,­
be continued in 1968. The idea has been discussed at the
national centennial conference and has received wide
support. The train may either cross Canada again as it is
~oing this year or tour the united States to stimulate
tourist interest.
The Michigan Public Service Commission has
approved Canadian Pacific Railways application to discontinue
its passenger service between Detroit and Windsor.
A Newfoundland royal commission on trans­
portation report has urged the maintenance and improvement
of passenger train services in the province even if such
steps are not economically justifiable. It maintains that
the railway is the vital link of transportation in the
province and that CNs plans to replace passenger train
service with a bus service are not in the best interests
of Newfoundland.
The contract for CNs new bridge across the
Second Narrows near Vancouver has been awarded to Dosco
Industries Ltd., Canadian Bridge Division of Walkerville,
Ontario. The new bridge will be 2,174 feet long with a
493 foot lift span which will rise 153 feet above high water.
This will replace the existing railway bridge which haE
a maximum lift height of 140 feet and a span of 286 feet.
The new bridge will facilitate passage of all types of
water traffic and is due to be completed by September 1968.
Eightly thousand series fifty foot newsprint
box cars now being delivered to Canadian Pacific are in a
new paint scheme. The cars have no roof walks and are
green with black ends, white lettering and the red Newsprint
service only shield has been replaced by a circle containing
a tree. Cars in the new paint scheme number up from 80967.
CN has applied to the Board of Transport
Commissioners to discontinue passenger service between
Charlottetown and a number of eastern Prince Edward Island
points including Murray Harbour, Georgetown and Souris.

lit
co
Z ….
z
c:t
co
l1li:
II:

co
….
0
l1li:
c:t

Z
0
4:>ueJa 6u01
~
0

Z
lOA
::E
>lJBd 9UJOl
Z
l1li:
lOA
>
0
C>
CANADIAN 131 R A I L
CN said that freight services in P.E.I. would be improved
if permission to drop the passenger runs is granted.
United Aircraft of Canada Limited has
announced that the introduction of CNs 120 mph Turbo
Trains will be delayed for three months because of
difficulties in obtaining required materials. Although
a three-car prototype Turbo will begin testing in a few
weeks deliveries of operational trains will not take
place until early fall.
Regular service on the Ontario governments
GO Transit commuter service between Hamilton and Pickering
went into operation on May 23, 1967. The first train left
oakville for Torontos Union Station at 5:50 a.m.
Information for the above news items was contributed by
D.W. Hatley and F.M. Kerr.
GO TBANSJ:T GOBS
~e signs above this Government of Ontario T-ransi t
push-pull train proclaim Bank of Montreal and Montreal Trust,
but citizens of that city must go over three hundred miles south­
west to experience being encouraged to ride as a commuter on eN
track. Specially designed commuter trains carrying the green and
silver-white colours of GO Transit went into service in the Toronto
area on May 23; the first train to inaugurate the service rolled
out of Oakville at 5:50 am. Financed by the Ontario Government,
the service is expected to attract 15,000 commuters off the high­
ways in the sixty-mile corridor between Hamilton and Pickering.
The Ontario Government invested fifteen million dollars in GO, and
will pay CN an estimated two million dollars a year to meet oper­
ating expenses. On the other hand, the cost of building a six-lane
expressway ranges between three-and-one-half million dollars, and
four million dollars a mile. An elevated road such as Torontos
Gardiner Expressway costs about sixteen million dollars a mile, the
same cost as providing GO commuter service over sixty miles.
It is interesting to note the effect of a provincial
subsidy on Canadian ~ational Railways: CN has undertaken to run an
attractive, frequent commuter service on what is already high­
traffic track. Contrasted with this is the south shore commuter
service out of Hontreal where the one evening commuter train is
sometimes delayed up to thirty minutes in twenty miles because of
conflictions with the one or two mainline trains operated over
that line in the early evening.
• •• GO Transit photo

CNs Comfortable Caboose
•• ••
•• ••
CN
is beginning a programme to modernize its fleet of cabooses
which will see the gradual elimination of the approximately
1150 wooden cars presently in service and their replacement by
steel-shelled units boasting a host of new comfort, convenience,
and safety features. The principal new feature will be the introduc­
tion of electricity, derived from axle-driven generators, which will
produce for lighting, refrigeration, hot plates, marker lights, ra­
dio telephones and incinerating toilets.
A second innovation of the new cabooses will be a wide­
vision glassed cupola which will be placed at the top centre of the
car to afford crewmen a better view of the train. Integral parts
of this new cupola will be safety glass, wind deflectors and elec­
tric windshield wipers.
Included among new features for the comfort
are such luxuries as upholstered swivel chairs with
rests in both the Cl1p)la and comuctor s desk, two modern
one equipped for cooking, overhead safety grab-irons,
aluminum windows, and a plentiful supply of water for
cooking.
of the crew
safety head
oil stoves,
draft-free
washing and
The new car will be five feet longer than the old-type
caboose and will feature roller bearings, specially designed wheel
sets and shock-absorbing underframes to smooth the ride.
The first contract for 150 of the new units has been a­
warded to Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., Montreal. ·The steel shells
will be built at its Trenton, N.S. works with the cars being com­
pleted at its Montreal plant. The estimated cost per unit is in
the neighbourhood of $40,000. Delivery was scheduled to begin in
February.
This whole project came about as a result of collabora­
tion between CN officials and heads of the Brotherhood of Railroad
Trainmen. It has been five years in the works and included the
construction of a prototype caboose (No. 79184) which aided in the
ironing-out of a number of basic operational problems which came to
light in the course of 79184s service on a variety of runs.
This new-look caboose is the first of one hundred and
fifty soon to be delivered to Canadian National Railways.
The new units are being built by the Hawker Siddeley Co.
and were ordered by the National to meet the needs of
modern long-train operations and high speeds.
(photos courtesy Canadian National).
Honeymoon Train
The .honeymoon train of
the Japanese National Railways
(JNRJ has proved to be a hit,
and it is said that this might
be the turning point in JNRs
manner of operating.
Up to now, the JNR has been
criticized for being too bureau-
cratic. …
Calie<:l the kotobuki (feli­
citations), this traIn runs be­
tween Kyoto and Beppu, Kyu­
shu. It wiH run on every lucky
day until May 28.
The first honeymoon train
left Kyoto at 5.57 pm on March
3 and nrrived in Beppu at 8.08
am the next day.
EvelY bit of consideration
was shown to passengers in or­
der to show that JNR was serio
ously thinking about changing
its business policies.
For example, great care was
taken to ensure that the tem­
peratuIe in the compartments
remained at about 23 degrees
centigrade throughout the
night.
The lights were dimmed at
9.30 pm, three hours earlier
than on regular night trains.
The conductor checked to see
whIch .passengers were getting
oft· at Beppu and. which ones
were continuing down Kyushu.
This was .done so that the
groups arriving at Beppu could
be handled effiCiently. A
lot of work went into
making the honeymoon train a
success.
On the other hand, it has
proven that even. the JNR· can
provide good service if it wants.
JNR President Reisuke Ishida
has repeatedly said that what
is lacking in the JNR is com­
petitive spirit and the desire to
make a profit.
He has al,o pointed out many
tImes that an enterprise can­
not have a reaSOll for existing
unless It rna ices a profit.
The honeymoon train was
clreamed up as one way to
make money. But the people
concerned had to undergo much
in order to make the project a success.
They 11aU to take
chances, for there was no as­
surance that the plan would
EVERY lucky clay Kotobukl
honeymoon. train; packed
with honeymooners, runs be­.
tween Kyoto and Beppu,
Kyushu.
succ~ed.
Honeymooning is becoming
more and more expensive these
days. This was one reason why
the JNR thought of operating
the honeymoon train. But on
the other hand, the officials also
realized that they were losing
honeymooning passengers to
other trans porta tion services be­
cause of their inefficiency and
poor service.
The biggest headache for
couples planning to marry is
how to secure transportation fol
their honeymoon. They can
book hotels a year in advance,
but they have t6 wait until the
last minute to make reserva­
tions on JNR trains.
The situation is much differ­
ent in the case of Ships and
ail·planes. Kansai Kisen accepts
reservations from newlyweds at
any time. And from last July,
All Nippon Airways began ac­
cepting reservations from pro­
spective honeymooners !lP to
three months in advance.
Fearing that they would be
left behind if they did nothing
about the reservation system,
the JNR, which previously ac­
cepted reservations only a week
in advance, came up with the
honeymoon train, which couid
be booked well in advance.
How can we provide the best
service? This problem was dis­
cussed from all angles with the
conclusion that the best way
to provide s~rvice is to capture
the hearts of the passengers.
All preparations were basecl
on this line of thinking.
The first question was wheth­
er to use sleepers or coaches
with reclining seats. Consider­
ing that newlyweds would want
to spend their first night to­
gether, the JNR officials decided
on reclining seats.
They also decided ·to provide
the best service fromthe start,
and they drew up a plan to
give passengers specially pre­
pared tickets similar to those
issued by airline companies.
However, the JNR went still
further.
To each couple, the JNR gave
10 free admission tickets. The
tickets mentioned the time ·and
date of departure, as well as
the couples names. The tickets,
bearing colorful designs of a
crane in pink and gold, looked
more like an invita tion card.
Seventeen veteran conductors
attached to the Kyoto Con-
ductors Station were assigned
to the honeymoon train. Since
they had not traveled before on
trains plying between Mojl and
Beppu, they immediately went
on test rides on their days off :
md returned with bundle~ of
pamphlets which they could
study.
They were also asked to draft
a cOllgratulatory message to be
announced over the PA system.
The JNR officials gave tllis task
to the conductors because they
considered that the men that
would actually make the an­
nouncement could come up
with a better message than a
cliche·filled s
tereotyped one
drafted by a professional
wrIter.
The final draft was finished
just before the departure of the
first honeymoon train. Some
conductors practiced the speech
after recording it in tape.
The best first,class coaches
were used and the trains were
thoroughly cleaned to befit the
occasion.
Toward the end of February,
several meetings were held in
Beppu between JNR officials
and representatives of hotels,
tourist lesorts alld bus com­
.panies.
Because they felt they could
not fail, JNR officials stressed
the need for the best ~ervice
and comfort for their prospec·
tive passengers.
As a
result, it· was decided
that new buses would be used,
to also be called kotobllki, and
would be driven by veteran
drivers. The bus guides and
hotel staff agreed to treat the
honeymooners with spe:ial
care,
The first honeymoon train
left Kyoto at 5.57 pm from No 7
platform. This platform was
chosen because seven is a lucky
number.
The train, about 80 percent
full, stopped at Osaka to take
on more passengers.
But more of a success for the
JNR was the way the platforms
at Kyoto and Osaka were
crowded with well·wishers.
Nothing could have been a het·
ter publicity stunt than having
the platforms crowded with ki·
mono·clad women and men
dressed in formal clothes,
The congratulatory message
was announced shortly after the
train crossed the bridge span·
ning the. Yodo River.
One conductor pledged he
would do his best to make
this trip one of the happiest
memories in yow life.
The message seemed to have
created a favorable impression.
One bride said:
The message was vcry be·
fitting .and pleasing to heal. I
felt as if I was riding in some·
thing other than a train.
As the tlafn neared Beppu, a
conductor went around dlstri·
(From Yomiuri, courtesy W. McKeown.)
buling ballpoin( pens inscribed
with Conglatulations on your
happy wedding. At the same
lime, he asked the passengers
to complete a questionnaire,
When the train reached Bep·
pu at 8.08 am, a band was on
hand to play the wedding
march, All the station person·
nel were lined up to welcome
the newlyweds.
According to one bride, one
good point about the honey·
moon train was that you dont
have to WOrly about being star·
ed at, as is the case when
traveling on regular trains.
The idea of using reclin ing
seats: proved a success, for
~even ou t of evely 10 cou pies
thought the seats were better
than bunks.
The fear that th~ honeymoon
train might be shunned was
unfounded as all ot.her honey·
moon· trains have been fully
hooked,
In a word, it can be said that
the honeymoon train is a big
success for the JNR.
Below is REPTON #926 of the Southern, now British Rail,
which was on public display at Windsor Stn, Montreal, re­
cently. It was built in 1934, one of theSchools Class:
and once headed royal trains between London and Windsor,
England. It is now at steamtown Railway Museum at Bell­
ows Falls, Vermont.
~ Centennial Snmmer Schetlnles d
-by F. A. Kemp –
T
his year in which we commemorate 100 years of Canadas history
as a Confederation, would be a good one in which to compare
schedules for Canadian passenger trains in 1867 and 1967, but
this could be done only within a limited area, as most of the lines
now in operation were undreamed of then, and some of the main lines
of 1867 have no passenger trains at all! The lines which could be
compared are Halifax-Truro and Windsor, N.S., Saint John-Moncton,
N.B., Pointe Levi (Levis)-Richmond-Coaticook-Portland-Montreal­
Toronto-Stratford-London and Toronto-Hamilton-Niagara Falls-Paris­
London-Windsor and Toronto-Orillia, which lines now are all part of
Canadian National Railways, except that between Windsor Jct. and
Windsor, N.S. now part of CPRs Dominion Atlantic Railway.
If anyone can supply passenger train schedules of Grand
Trunk Railway of 1867, or those of Nova Scotia Ry. or European &
North American Ry. (New Brunswick Ry.) such a comparison might be
possible.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
Three hours and 59 minutes between Montreal and Toronto
would have been considered wild insanity in 1867, when Grand Trunk
passengers usually spent 15 hours on the journey; yet this is what
we are promised when CN Turbotrains Nos. 62-63, 66-67 and ,68-69
start their much-heralded first runs. In the meantime, Rapido
trains 60-61 and 64-65 continue their 299-minute schedules, with
stops at both Dorval and Guildwood, a new GO Transit station in
Scarboro, 12.2 miles from Union Station. The GO Transit service is
to begin operation May 23, following the Victoria Day week-end,
with push-pull trains and self-propelled units between Pickering
and Hamilton trains 988, 989, 990, 991.
A new Toronto-Ottawa through service is now provided by
trains 44-45, which now operate on a completely separate schedule
from that of the Bonaventure trains 54-55. Trains 54-55 now run
75 minutes earlier at 1535 from both Montreal and Toronto, and also
14 minutes faster. A new Railiner 649-650 has begun operation be-
tween Montreal and Belleville, but the Toronto-Belleville locals
209-210 have been discontinued, cutting another group of smaller
towns from the list served by CN passenger service.
West of Toronto, the main feature is the renumbering of
Toronto-London-Windsor, Toronto Sarnia-Chicago and Toronto-Niagara
Falls trains, but Toronto-Windsor trains 219-220 will make their
last runs June 30th. Toronto-Kapuskasing trains 87-88 are to be
rescheduled July 1st in a drastic move to cut 90 minutes from the
running time of 87 and 40 from 88. Sleeper passengers will thus be
deprived of their complimentary dinner on 87 and of Continental
breakfast on 88.
Capreol-Foleyet passengers will have a tri-weekly pass­
enger train 194-195 to supplement the mixed trains 266-267 over
this subdivision. No. 203 will also carry passengers between
Capreol and Winnipeg June 17 to Sept. 11.
CANADIAN
137 R A I L
The Super Continental will again operate as seoarate
Montreal-Vancouver (1-2) and Toronto-Vancouver (3-4) trains between
June 1 and October 1. Runnin~ time of all trains has been increased
by anywhere from 20 minutes (No.1) to 185 minutes (Nos. 5).
Canadian Nationals Ivlontreal-Ottawa service has been ex­
panded to seven round trips daily with the addition of Trains 32
and 37. The latter is merely the separated Ottawa portion of Train
1, which no longer carries passengers to Ottawa.
East of Montreal, most of the changes are effective only
on June 1st, and amount to a considerable revamping of service be­
tween Nontreal, eastern Q,uebec and the Atlantic Provinces.
Raoido service to Quebec will be doUbled with the addition
of trains numbered 22-23 and 26-27 to join the double-daily service
provided by renumbered trains 20-21 and 24-25. Trains 22 and 23
will stop at Drummondville and at Charny, where they will connect
with new Railiners 618-619 for Campbellton and intermediate sta­
tions. Trains 18 and 19, the old Maritime Express and one of the
oldest CN schedules, will be discontinued, as will service to local
stations between Drummondville and Charny, and between Campbellton
and J.1oncton.
The numbers 18 and 19 will be assumed by a new train be­
tween r.lontreal and Sydney, N.S. via Edmundston. Named the Cabot
it marks a break-through in many ways; the first through service
over the former National Transcontinental route in many years, as
well as the first through service to Sydney in a long time; even
through sleeper service ended several years ago. On the other hand,
it has resulted in the ending of local Moncton-Edmundston service
with discontinuance of Trains 117-118, in an area with bad roads
and little or no bus service. The Truro-Sydney service will be
reduced from three to two trains daily, as overni~ht trains 109-112
and 110-111 and Railiners 601 and 602 are discontinued. Railiners
601 and 602 tlill provide Truro-Halifax connections for the Cabot
beginning also on June 1.
Local service on the Gaspe line has also been reduced by
the replacement of Railiners 616-617 and mixed trains 245-246 with
through trains 118-119, which stop only at principal stations, con­
nect ~ith the Chaleur at Campbellton instead of Matapedia, and
take up to 1 hour and 45 minutes longer for the Montreal-Gaspe trip.
Newfoundland services will be adjusted to connect with
the Cabot but will revert to their former times on September 30,
necessitating an overnight stay at North Sydney westbound. Trains
101-102 will operate daily June 17-Sept. 12th only, otherwise tri­
weekly.
Other adjustments include rescheduling of 613-614 between
Moncton and Saint John and the end of chartered bus service between
Riviere-du-Loup and Edmundston.
Another train was added to Montreal-Deux Montagnes sub­
urban service April 30, and a second began Hay 15th.
CANADIAN 138 R A I L
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Only two tiny portions of the railway that built a country
was in existance in the year of Confederation, and both of these
sections (St. Andrews-Richmond N.B.; Lanoraie-Joliette, Que.) are
now without passenger service. The only ccncessions to the demands
of Centennial year have been the provision of the EXPO LHlITED,
trains 5-6 between Montreal and Vancouver and 15-16 between Toronto
and Sudbury, on a schedule like that of the old Dominion, and of
an additional eveninR Commuter train 295-298 between Montreal and
Ste. Annes. Trains-5 and 6 are makin~ m~Bt of the stops between
Sudbury and vfuite River, thus replacing~Dayliners 417-418.
Q,UEBEC CENTRAL
Passenger service between Quebec and Sherbrooke came to
an end on April 29th with the last run of Trains 1 & 4 handled by
RDC unit 9062.
NORTHERN ALBERTA
Tri-weekly mixed trains 77 and 78 replaced twice-weekly
RDC Trains 7 and 8 between Dunvegan Yards and Waterways, Alta.
PACIFIC GREAT EASTEfu~
This railways passenger service has continued to decline,
and only a tri-weekly service is provided between Lilooet and Prince
George, although there is still a daily North Vancouver-Lilooet
servIce.
Another change in the current issue of CNs public time­
table folder is the revised system map altered -(presumably)-to
show only those lines over which passenger services are operated.
If this be the object of the Change, however, there are a number of
discrepancies:
The section of the N.T.R. between Ke,puskasing and Hearst
is still shown by a heavy line although advertised passenger facil­
ities indicate that only a bUB service is available in this area.
The same for the for~er passenger-train-on-ferry link between
Windsor and Detroit. In the West, the Athabasca line and the
Heinsberg line are both shown on the map although no mention of the
service is made in the tables. Perhaps more serious is the reten­
tion of the Cabot line between Winnipeg and Portage la Prairie and
the Victoriaville-Aston Jct. segment in Quebec. Any conductor .taking
his train over these routes would no doubt have to do some explain­
ing to his superintendent!
The former l (& Waterloo & Farnham) is also shown, but this is o.k.: a number
of C.R.H.A. enthusiasts can vouch for passenger operations over
that route -at least on t-lay 28th last.
CANADIAN 139 R A I L
A SlJmlARY -Trains Discontinued
CN 111-112 Overnight Daily Truro Sydney May 31
CN 109-110 Local

Truro Halifax

CN 601-602 Railiner
II
Truro Sydney
CN 18-19 Local Ex. Sun. Moncton Campbellton
CN 616-617 Railiner Daily Campbellton Gaspe
CN 245-246 Mixed Ex. Sun. Campbellton Gaspe
CN 18-19 Local Daily Montreal Campbellton
CN 117-118 Local Mo. We.Frio Moncton Edmundston May 30
CN 209-210 Local Ex.Sat.Sun. Toronto Belleville April 28
CN 988-999 Local
II II

Toronto Hamilton May 19
CN 989-990 Local Ex. Sun. Toronto Hamilton t4ay 20
CN 219-220 Express Ex. Sun. Toronto Windsor June 30
CN 87-88 Northland Daily Kapuskasing Hearst Nov.27,
1966
Q,C 1-2 & 4 Dayl1ner Daily Q.uebec Sherbrooke April 29
CP 109-110 Vlinnipee; Daily St. Paul Winnipeg NotAvailable
CP 337-338-339-
To be
340 Dayl1ner Daily Windsor Detroit litnnOunced
CP 417-418 Day l1ne r Tri-,leekly Sudbury /hiteRiver April 29
Trains Added
CN 18-19 Cabot Daily Montreal Sydney June 1
CN 118-119 Chaleur Daily Campbellton Gaspe June 1
CN 618-619 Rail1ner Daily Charny Campbellton

CN 22-23-26-27 Rapidos Daily Montreal Q.uebec June 1
CN 955-956
Suburban Daily Montreal Deux Montagnes April
CN
II

May 15
CN 32-37 Express Daily t-lontreal Ottawa April 30
CN 44-45 Express Daily Toronto Ottawa April 30
CN 649-650 Ral line r Daily Montreal BelleVille April 30
CN 601-602 Rail1ner Daily Truro Sydney June 1
CP 5-6
ExpoLimitedDaily Montreal Vancouver April 30
CP 15-16
II Daily Toronto Sudbury April-May3
CP 295-298 Dayl1ner Daily ~!ontreal Ste.Annes April 30
Trains Renumbered CN
41 to 141 Erie Toronto to liindsor
42 to 142 Tecumseh Windsor to Toronto
46 to 146 St. Clair Windsor to Toronto
47 to 147 St. Clair Toronto to Windsor
48 to 148 Erie Y;indsor to Toronto
49 to 149 Tecumseh Toronto to Windsor
50 to 150 Huron Sarnia to Toronto
51 to 151 Huron Toronto to Sarnia
53 to 153 Mohawk Toronto to Port Huron
54
to 154 Mohawk Port Huron to Toronto
53 to 197
Port Huron to Chicago
54
to 198
Chicago to Port Huron
55
to 155 International Toronto to Chicago
56 to 156 International Chicago to Toronto
58 to 158 Maple Leaf Chicago to Toronto
59 to 159 Maple Leaf Toronto to Chicago
148 to 140 Sunday only London to Toronto
149-150 to 107-108
Niagara Falls to Toronto
153-154 to 125-126
Niagara Falls to Toronto
155-156 to 137-136
Niagara Falls to Toronto
157-160 to 103-104 Toronto to Niagara Falls
163-164 to 127-128
Toronto to Niagara Falls
165-166 to 135-134
Toronto to Niagara Falls
1) #186 stated that CN 9318 arr1ved 1n Montreal YBrd
196~. Th1s should have read February 9, 1967.
February 9,
2) #180 showed CN 1633 and 1639 as hav1ng ser1al numbers
2689 respect1vely. These should have reBd 2883
respectlvelv.
IN
Purchases: up to May 1~, 1967.
26833nd
Elnd 2889
Ganadlan N8ttbnal has or~ered a total 0f 110 3000 horBepow~r
c-c locomot1ves. From ~!Ul come 0.2 DL-630s -16 to be dellvered 1n
Novemher and December 1967, w1th the re~~1n1ne 26 arr1v1ng between
.rn) 1s 26 sets of tra~t10n m0tors. GMDL 1s supply1ng 68 so-40s.
Other dptatl! ill he pub11!lhed 8S soon ~s aval1ahle.
CNs first two DL-fil0s, #2000 and 02001 w111 carry serlal
numbers ~-J479-01 and M-3479-02. The outshopp1n~ has been de19yed
unt11 June.
De11ver1es: up unt11 ~ay 16, 1967.
HO.A.D NUMBEH
3237
3238
3239
DATE DELIVEHED
Apr11 21, 1967
April 21, 1967
Hay 11, 1967
Ret1rements: up to May 16, 1967.
ROAD SERIAL BUILDe:R BUILT
NUt~BEH
<806 81211 llLYI 13/10/55
3819 815~)
~ILW
24/10/56
3822 8.1566 IlLlif 26/10/56
SERIAL NljlltiER
11 -)477-16
~1-3477-17
11-3477-18
RETIRED BUILDERS
110DEL
20/h/67 RS-10
20/0./67 RS-10
20/4/67 RS-10
NOJES
1
1 1
1) These units are not trade-1ns on eNs order presently unner
ne11vp.ry.
~pnt81s: u9 unt11 May 16, 1967.
N&W 3666 was recalled by 1ts owners Apr11 3, 1967 while ~658
was returned A~r11 10, 1967. Then on Apr11 16, 1967 (not April 17
ElS rep0rted 1n CnRa11 #188), #3658 was ar;a1n leased alonp; with
J671. In add1t1on, DMIs 155 and 158 wpre accepted hy CN at N[s
~1ces Po1nt yard at 18:40 on Apr11 28, 1967. They were expected to
go to H1nn1pee on Z/h17 EX .Iest Duluth at ob()ut 06:00 Apr11 ;:?,
19~7. (0ff1c1Rl leo!l1ng date 1[3 29/4/67).
CANADIAN 141 R A I L
r,;t;;r-ellln~Oqs: up to T-lay 16, 1967.
1) Steam locomotlves 6400 and 5700 appeared ln Montreal Yard today.
They are expected to GO to Ottawa on Traln 407 on M8Y 21, 1967.
(courtesy Charles E. De Jean).
2) #J1384 WFIS turned over to the GIeat Lakes [leGion from the St.
Llwrence Reclon on .~.9rll 27, 1967 for use ln ~)ol)thern Ontrto
servlce. The locomotlve wlll be returned to Polnt St. Charles
lc-ter to hfvP 1 ts electrlc generator lnstalle. 3) Unlts 31340 to 3844 were transferred fro~ the St. L8wrcnce neglon
to the Atlantlc Reglon on March 2, 1967. Unlt 1368 was trans­
ferred from the Pralrle Region to thp Mountaln Reglon on March
6, 1967. #8613 and #B-l were transferred from the Atlanttc
~ee;lon to the Gre3t Lakes Reelon on Aprll 10, 19t-7. Locomotl.ve
131)15 was transferred from the. St. L,wrence [leglon to the (;reat
L-o1{es Reclon on Aprll 20, 1967. (col)rtesy Charles E. De ,Te:m).
Deltverles: up to May 19, 191)7.
ROAD NTJMBER DATE DELIVEHED SERHL t:1.H1BER
555
1 M8rch
29, 1967 A-2196
5552
r~arch 16, 1967 A-?197
5552
March 22, 1967 A-2198
555
~1arch 22, 1967 A-2199
5555
NRrch 29, 1967 J -22 00
5556 March 29, 1967 /1-2201
5557
April 6, 1967 11-2202
5558 Iprll 6, 1967 }1-2203
5559
Aprll 13, 1967 1-2204
5560 Aprll 13, 1967 A-
7
205
5561 Aprll 20, 1967 11-2206
5562 April 20, 1967 A-2207
5563
Iprll 28, 1967 1-2208
5564 Iprll 28, 1967 A-2209
Rentals: up to January 2J, 1967.
DH ~015, 3023, 3026, 3035, 3045, 3047 Flnrj POE 621, 622, 623
have been returned to their owners.
Rental!;: II!) to lOebru8ry J, 1967.
f)~II 124 Bno 137 have been returned.
CANADIAN 142 R A I L
Miscellaneous: up to ~8y 19, 1967.
The follOwing ch8nges have been applied to CPs fleet between
Septemb~r 1, 1qh4 and ~ebru~ry 1, 19h7.
1) These fifteen units hB~ their steam ~enerators removed: 40)0,
40)6,
405?, 4061, 4439, 4440, 4444, 4445, 4463, 4464, 8401,R403,
8553, 855
4,
8555.
2) The following locomotives have had their weight changed 8S
shown.
ROA!) NUI1BER
40J6
4052
4439
4440
4441~
441~5
4446
1~46)
4464
6505
6506
PI1!::VIOUS liliIGHT
260,000
268,000
253,500
253,500
253,500
253,500
247,100
261,000
261,000
196,000
196,000
PHESENT EIGHT
252,000
257,000
258,500
258,500
258,500
258,500
258,500
258,hoo
258,400
215,400
215,400
vlEWHT CHANGe;
-8,000
-11,000
+ 5,· 000
t 5,000
+ 5,000
… 5,000
+11,400
-2,600
-2,600
+19,400
+19,I·WO
3) The units shown below have had their top speed and rear ratio
chaneerl.
ROAD Ntlr~BF:R PREVIOUS
SPEEO
40~1 to 4075 89
1909 89
1911 to 1919 89
8511 to 8512 65
PHESENT
S PEr::D
65
89
PIlEVIOUS
GEAR R/ITIO
58: 19
58: 19
58: 19
62: 15
PRESENT
GSMl. 11NiIO
62: 15
~2: 15
62: 15
58: 19
4) Locomotives 8548 to 8556 Bn~ 8601 to 8711 have ha~ their brakes
chBnEe~ fro~ 24_TIL to 26-c type.
5) Locomottves 6505, 6506, 7065, 7066, 70h7, 7068, 7069, 7070,B-100,
8-101 have been equippp~ with MU control.
6) Units 8401 and 840) have had their fuel capacity increased from
6(,7 to 1330 rrallons.
7) //70JO 8nrJ 117040 have been equipped to operate class S8-108
locomotives.
8) LocOrrloti ve 4448 has had its fuel cap8city changed from 100e
gallons economy diesel fuel plus 400 gallons re/3Ular cHesel fuel
to 1000 c;allons regular diesel fuel. ihe latter is stnd8ro for
these units.
9) GP-35s have had their idle speed increased from 275 rpm to 315
rpm.
CA.NADIA.N RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
ACquisitions: up to May 25, 1967.
The Canadian Railroad Historical Association has taken deliv­
ery of two new pieces of equipment: British Railways 60010 and
MTC 4042, and has accepted the offer of a third –CN 77. A brief
resume of these pieces follows.
BR 60010 -This locomotive has been adequately described in Mr. Worthen
j s article The Proud Beauty in Canadian Rail No. 188.
~ -This locomotive is the oldest existing diesel-electric of
the Canadian National Railways. It was built in May 1930 by the
Canadian Locomo·tive Company and Canadian Westinghouse and carried
CLC serial 1861. A diagram showing the unit as it is presently
running is included in this issue, as well as a photograph from the
William G. Cole collection shoing it illlder the number 7700. Other
data (courtesy E.L. Modler) is listed below:
Road Number
Class
Date
Place
1 2 7700
7700
0-21-a Q-l-a
5/30 12/31
Montreal
3
77
Q-l-a
28/12/50
Montreal
4
77
LS-4-a
1954
Tractive Effort: The locomotive was originally rated at 42%, but
was later derated to 36%. This was changed to 15% in September,
1953.
Prime over: The original was a six cylinder Westinghouse 400 HP
engine. This was changed to a 12 cylinder 500 HP Caterpillar en­
gine in September 1953, later derated to 380 HP.
Assignment: No.77 was originally used at Turcot Centre along with
7750 to switch at the repair track and coal chutes illltil about
1945. It was then assigned to Point St. Charles Shop with occas­
ional trips to the Thousand Islands Railway to replace 500. After
1958, it was kept at Gananoque permanently as 500s standby power.
Since retirement on December 31, 1962, the locomotive has been in
use by Canada Starch in Cardinal, Ontario. The locomotive is a gift
of the Canadian National Raihlays to the CRHA.
r-1TC 4042 –Following are details of this trolley coach, moved to
the museum at Delson on April 28, 1967:
Builder:
Date:
Serial No.
Model:
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
vlhee Ibase :
l(iotors:
Controls:
H.P. :
Voltage:
Seats:
In Service
Canadian Car & FOillldry November,
1947
CCB-T44-47-53tl7
T-44
35 7
8 6
1
9 7 (coach)
10 ~ (trolley pole
contactors lowered)
18,640 pOilllds
20 9
General Electric
General ElectriC
1 motor –140HP 6
00 V DC
43
12/1947 to 4/1966
Information and nhotof,raph -Denill Latour, Dorval.

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT DIESEL UNIT DATA BOOK
L 5
-4a.
77
CLASS
?C;-o·
LENWH
OF
CAB
.1
t-
0
[g
n
V
CO

.~
. I
II
~~
a ~ I)
fa
~ 11
-~
I .
I
~.~.5
5~f~IIOC·~
tj]
((.
t
J~~-.
~=
~~~~~+l~~~
1
,1
k
,<>!-
l~~r~
.
.o.-+:j
j
><-.1
Bl~
I-IO.~
W
a ~~
L
I
<
!~:=~P;;;:=:L
J
J
CAPACITIES
NG.
COOLING
WATER
93
USRICATING
OIL
IMP.
GAL
.
IMP.
GAL
WHEELS :-
TYPE
s.
CLASS
38-1/4
die.
ftC
ft
UEL
01
L
·400
IM~
GAL.
JOURNALS:
TYPE
s.
SIZE
AND
STORAGE
CU.
fT.
Friction
5.gn
x
10
TEAM
GEN.
WATER
IMP. GAL. –
OPERATING FEATURES
TRUCKS
:
AX.
SPEED
40
M.P.H
EAR
RATIO
16 :
70
E.
STARTING
42
~ilil…l.bs.
L
CONTINUOUS
r.~~OQO
n
PER.
CURVE
ALONE:
COUPLED.
I
STEAM
GENERATOR
None.
A
I R
COMPRESSOR
TTD

Wsstinghouso
C-75
COOLING
fANS
AIR
BRAKE
ELECTR~CAL
EQUIPMENT
TRACTION
MOTORS
IAUXILIARYGEN:TYpi
I.
!.I!
FOUR
WESTnWROUSE
582;..E-61 Y-G-15
IALTERNATOR;
TYPE
&.NSl.
1-,1
T.=:.-=-M-=-.-:S:-L-O::-:W.,…-::-E-=R—::M—O-=T::Oc::
R
c-:
S
,……..1
MAIN
GENERATOR
Can
Westinghouso
477B-8
M.U.
CONTROL
No
DYNAMIC
BRAKE
No

PROTDS
fram the
P 4 S T
The original Montreal west station, known as Montreal
Junotion, was built in 1888, and dismantled in 1905 in
which year the present station was opened. Note the
light-weight, WObbly-looking rails in the photo, and the
remains of a horse-drawn oart, reoently demolished by a
Passing train.
(Anon. )
Miscell~neous: up to May 19, 1967.
OnA ~Jnday during FebruAry 1966, a Burro crone ambled onto
DARs m8in line, having forgotten about a Sunday Only train.
RDC-1, 119058, W~s taken unawares and collided with the Burro. 9058
was dispcltehed to Angus for repairs and was re!?la-ced by CP 9057.
Early in March 1966, #9058 appeared in service out of Montreal,
still lettered Dominion Atlantic. It was not until late Septem­
ber that Canadi~n Pacific was applied to the car. It is Rssumed,
but not verified, that 9057 has been relettered DAR by this time.
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority: up to Mfly 16, 1967.
The BC Hydro and Power Authority ordered one B-B, 1000 horse­
power switcher last August for delivery this June.
Spruce Falls Power and Paper: up to N8Y 16, 1967.
The builders number of SFP&Ps DL-411 is M-J48J-01.
Indian StRte Railways: up to May 16, 1967.
The road numbers of the first )0 units are 6167 to 6196. The
seriels for the entire order are M-J484-01 to M-J484-J2.
SMOKE ABATEMENT PROGRAM
GET A DIESEL!
CANADIAU RAIL I
Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Conuni ttee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Subscription includes Associate Membership: $4.00 annually.
PUBLICAT IONS COf1tlITTEE:
EDITOR, CANADIA~! RAIL:
ASSOCIATE EDITOR:
NEi/S EDITOR:
.E~rnERSHIP EDITOR:
POWER EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
MD1BERSIlIP CHAIRl!AN:
D.R. Henderson, Chairman
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
William Pharoah
Anthony Clee;e Derek
Booth
Derek Boles
Murray Dean
John W. Saunders
J. A. Beatty
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
We hope you will visit
expo67 {fY~
MONTREAL-~ M-~ @
APR. 28 -OCT. 27.1967
OTTAWA VALLEY: Kenneth F. Chivers, Apt. 3, 67 Somerset st. W., Ottawa, Onto PACIFIC
COAST: Peter Cox, 2936 W. 28th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
SASKATCHEWAN: J.S. Nicolson, 2306 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Sask.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN: V.H. Coley, 11243 -72nd Ave., Edmonton, Alta.
FAR EASTI W.D. McKeown, 900 Senriyama (Oaza), Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: John H. Sanders, 67 Willow lay, Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyrif,ht 1967
Printed in Canada on
Canadian paper

Demande en ligne