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Canadian Rail 188 1967

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Canadian Rail 188 1967

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J@RmfLll
May
1967
Nwnber 188
Our cover shows one of the best photos weve seen of a CPR
T2-a Class tank engine. Number 1992 was built by the CPR
in May 1910, was renumbered to 5992 in 1912. and scrapped in
1934. The photo was taken at Pointe Fortune. Quebec. some­
time between 1910 and 1912. The line between Pointe Fortune
and Rigaud was abandoned about 1936.
Photo Collection of Roger Boisvert


98
Loading
(Photo,
is
the Dominion of Canada aboard
at London, England.
which appeared in The Times and
courtesy Keystone Press Agency,
the M. V. Beaveroak
The Daily Telegraph,
Limi ted. )
OUR PROUt) B€auty
33 Waterlow Road
Highgate Hill
London N. 19, England.
12.4.67
The Custodian
by S. S. Worthen
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
Montreal, Canada.
Dear Sir:
It was with some regrets I saw the enclosed picture of my
old engine Dominion of Canada leaving these shores. But I am
sure she will be much admired by all ,<{ho see her in Canada.
I have very happy memories of the engine as I was the
first fireman to work on the Dominion of Canada along with Driver
G. Burfoot (now dead). We collected the engine from the Doncaster
Plant after her completion and had the honour to be in charge of
her on the day of the naming ceremony at Kings Cross Station,
London, on June 15th., 1937, which was performed by the Right Hon­
orable Vincent ?-1assey, whose autograph I still possess and treasure.
Then, on the following day, we took the Prime Minister of Canada,
Mr. W. L. Mackenzie-King to Edinburgh. A few days later, we took
the engine on a speed trial and attained a speed of 110 m.p.b.
This, of course, was not a record, but we thought it a remarkable
achievement, as we had a load of 450 tons.
We then worked the engine on the first trip of the new
Coronation train, Edinburgh to London, in 6 hours. Vie had a won­
derful receution on arrival at Kings Cross. The station was be­
decked with flags and bunting and a huge crowd was at the station
to welcome us.
I am now of course retired, so have now only cherished
memories of a very fine engine, also a collection of photographs of
her, taken at different times. My one regret is I cannot be with
you for her historic occasion. I am sure all Canadians will feel
justly proud of the Dominion of Canada.
All good wishes and success for your Museum.
Yours very truly,
(signed) Ronald Middleton
And so, by such a simple device as the writing and receiv­
ing of a letter, is the door to memory unlocked.
The period which began some six months after October,
1929, is not one which is remembered with pleasure or enthusiasm by
most of the population who were then in their early twenties. It
was, and still is, referred to as The Depression. Life for the
averae;e man was far from easy, and the generation which followed
has been cautioned again and again against a repetition of the same
CANADIAN 100 R A I L
circumstances which, it is said, favoured its advent.
As the world moved slowly through the early thirties,
there were some signs that a dogged resistance to economic chaos
was being maintained. This was particularly true among the railways
of Great Britain and North America. In spite of the drastic cur­
tailment of the economic tempo in various countries, large sections
of the population could and did continue to travel. The jobbers
who had been suc-ceeded by the travelling salesmen, and who in
turn would be displaced by company representatives, continued to
go about the country in ever-increasing numbers. Better service to
their customers meant more orders, at a time when orders ,ere as
precious as gold~ Better service meant more frequent visits and
more rapid delivery of goods, and before very long, the railways
discovered that in the midst of the Depression, they had a market­
able commodity –speed~
In England, there began in 1932, a flurry the likes of
which had not been seen since the Great Race to the North in 18813
and 1895. In North America, the old-time rivalry between Canadian
National Railways, the successor to the Grand Trunk Railway of Ca­
nada and the progressive Canadian Pacific Railway flared anew.
South of the 49th. parallel, and west from Chicago, the Chicago,
Burl1ngton and Quincy and the Union Pacific disturbed the uneasy
but apparently permanent peace with their old rival, the Achison,
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. It was quite impossible to restrain
this urge, which had lain dormant for more than twenty years. And
the results of the reawakening were to have some irrevokable and
permanent effects on the railways allover the world.
It was essential that the patrons of the railway be car­
ried from one large city to another in the least possible time.
Thus, the railways were not aiming so much at a speed record as a
consistently high average speed, over a relatively long distance.
In Great Britain, the North-Eastern Railway had scheduled a train
from Darlington to York -44.1 miles -in 43 minutes from the begm­
ning of the 20th. century. In 1923, the Swindon-London time of the
Great Western Railway I s Cheltenham Flyer had been reduced to 75
minutes, for an average start-to-stop speed of 61.8 miles per hour.
In 1929, a further 5 minutes had been chopped from the schedule,
thus raising the average speed for the run to 66.2 miles per hour,
and for a time, tnis was the fastest scheduled railway run in the
world.
But wonder of wonders~ In 1931 and 32, the Canadian
Pacific Railway in distant Canada, took over the Blue Ribband by
scheduling its Royal York (Montreal-Toronto) between Montreal
West and Smiths Falls-124.0 miles -in the extraordinary time of
108 minutes, for an average scheduled speed of 68.9 miles per hour
for the distance. The Canadian Nationals Intercity Limited could
not match this pace, since it served a more populated section of
the St. Lawrence Valley, and had a consequently greater number of
speed restrictions and revenue stops.
The Great Western, in England, was quick to retaliate, by
reducing the time of the Cheltenham Flyer by 3 minutes to achieve
an average scheduled speed between Swindon and London of 69.2 miles
per hour. The final and unassailable reduction in this schedule
(in September, 1932) to a flat 65 minutes for the 77.3 miles, re­
sulted in an overall average of 71.4 miles per hour, which, for
that time, was truly remarkable.
·1
CANADIAN 101 R A I L
For a couple of years, the Great Western in England en­
joyed the speed limelight, but experiments already under way with
diesel-electric powered trains on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy
Railroad ln the Unlted States, were gradually portending the shape
of thlngs to come. Meantlme, the other large Engllsh railway com­
panles were preparlng to win over the speed crown from their rival.
Both the London, Midland and Scottish and the London & North Eastern
Railways were spurred on by the two-year-old thoroughbred –the
Flyin~ Hamburger –ln Germany, and the revolutlonary Pioneer
Zephyr in the Unlted States.
To the appeal of the Chief ?-l:echanlcal Engineer of the
London & North Eastern for permisslon to bul1d a high-speed stream-
11ner, the Companys direotors said Yes. And so, in November
1934, a four coach traln loaded with offlcials, . and headed by a
spanklng new locomotive, snorted out of Rlngs Cross Statlon,
London, polnted ln the general dlrection of Scotland. It was a test
train, and the engineer, William Sparshatt, who had a reputation
for 11king speedy performances, snatched the traln up the main 11ne
with enthuslasm and with vigor! Almost before you could say Jack
Roblnson, mile-post 153.75 from London had been passed in the net
tlme of exactly 2 hours. The traln came to a stand ln Leeds station
2 hours and 32 minutes (and 185.8 miles) after leavlng London. This
was the fastest time ever recorded between these two polnts, and
was 13 mlnutes less than the test schedule. On the return trip,
two coaches were added for a total of 233 tons behlnd the 167 tons
of engine and tender. On the favourable down grades to London, the
100 ml1e-an-hour mark was reached brlefly, and the 185.8 mile run
was completed ln 157.25 minutes. In one days round trip, over 250
miles had been covered at an average of 80 miles per hour. The
englne was called the Flylng Scotsman and was lndeed worthy of
her name!
And so the reputation of Nigel Gresley, Chlef Mechanical
Engineer of the London & North Eastern Ral1way began to be forged.
Three months later, and hBuJed by a newer 4-6-2 loc omot 1 ve Papyrus,
greater trlumphs were recorded. Wl th a boiler pressure of 220 lbs.,
(as opposed to the former level of 180 Ibs.) improved valve-settlngs
and a better front-end deslgn, Papyrus reached the unbe lievable
top speed of 108 m.p.h., with 12.25 ml1es recorded at better than
100 m.p.h. On a one-days round trip between London and Newcastle,
Papyrus had covered almost 300 miles at an average of 80 ml1es
per hour.
Perhaps a pause should be taken at this point, to consider
how such speeds are measured, and what provlslons are made to es­
tabllsh the authenticity of the speed beyond any reasonable doubt.
A short quotatlon mlght be in order:
It ls posslble that some readers may compare the speeds that I
have quoted wlth some of the earlier and much publicized rec­
ords ln the Unlted States, such as No. 999s 112 miles per
hour on the New York Central Railroad and the 127 mile-per­
hour Pennsylvania flgure. It ls for thls reason that I have
stressed the wealth of flgures that we (In Brltaln) have to
substantlate all of these records of recent years ln Great
Brltaln, tlmed as they have been to fractlons of seconds, by
different observers checking one another, and corroborated on
the fastest runs by the inerrant check of the dynamometer car
readlngs.
TheBe words from Mr. Cecil J. Allen, who, for almost 40
years has been recording goings-on on the English railway scene.
Further, from Mr. D. p. Morgan, Editor of TRAINS Magazine:
Legends aside, rail sueed exoerts -both here and abroad­
tend to write off the Central and Pennsy records as interest­
ing but authoritative because of inadequate proof.
To return to our narrative, the accomplishments of the
enp;ine tlpapyrus had set the stage for the next development on the
LNER. In 1935, King George V and Queen Mary celebrated the Silver
Jubilee of their reign. In September of that year, the Silver Ju­
bilee express was introduced, and three days before the official
inauguration, a trial trip was arranged for the press. This was
quite a trip! No one who rode the train that day is ever likely to
forget it. Nothing like this train had ever been seen before in
Great Britain, -or in the world, for that matter. Decorated in
silver-gray and stainless steel, the train was powered by a spade­
nosed and completely streamlined 4-6-2,–Silver Link. Behind the
tender were seven coaches, some of them articulated, and all with a
new
system of sprjnging, which on this trial run gave the passengers
a few rude shocks. Equally shocking was the speed for the trip
from London to Peterborough. -On the northbound trip, 43 miles were
covered at an average of 100 miles per hour, and 70 miles at an
average of 91.3 m.p.h. The maximum near Hitchin was a cool 112.5
m.p.h.
On the following Monday, and Just to prove what could be
done with this remarkable new train, the Silver Jubilee began
running on a regular schedule, operating 537 miles per day, five
days a week, on daily scheduled double-nonstop runs of 232.3 miles
each at an average of 70.4 m.p.h.
103
London was certainly nearer Newcastle, via the Silver
Jubilee express. Before long, the Silver Jubilee had become one
of Britains most popular trains, and people were all thronging to
Kings Cross, where the action was.
All this time, the London, Midland and Soottish Railway
had not been standing idly by. The speed laurels were still up for
grabs, and the oompetition was not long in showing its paces. With
the death of King George V in 1936, and the acoession of King Edward
VIII, followed by his abdication, King George VI had oome to the
throne. To oommemorate the ooronation in 1937, the LNER had planned
a new London -Edinburgh train, to be oalled the Coronation. This
new train would be scheduled to cover the 393 miles in 6 hours
flat,-by no means a small feat~ The LMSR was thereby forced into
the pOSition of providing a comparable sohedule preferably a
better one -for its 401.5 mile route between the two old capitols.
The Coronation of the L.M.S., olaimed to have been the latest
word in looomotive streamlining. This was the first of five
engines built at Crewe Works for powering the Coronation Soot
a Euston (London) -Glasgow sohedule that required much 100 mph
running. The train was inaugurated July), 1937.
To meet the challenge, the LMS built an eight coach train weighing
about 302 tons full, and powered it with a 4-6-2 engine weighing
181 tons with tender and having a tractive effort of 40,000 lbs. at
85% boiler pressure. The time to Edinburgh on the LMS was projected
to be 6.5 hours, and on a trial trip, the new Coronation Scot
cracked the existing speed record at mile-post 156, with a top of
114 m.p.h. However, the conditions surrounding this record were
such as to prohibit any approximation of it in regular service.
Notwithstanding this fact, the return run of the special from Crewe
to London covered the 158.1 miles in 119 minutes, with a start-to­
stop average of 79.7 miles an hour.
There now appeared on the scene a new LNER locomotive,
number 4489. She had emerged from the paint shop at the Doncaster
Works of the London & North Eastern late in April, 1937. Of the
class A4, she we~ed 167.9 tons with her tender, and had three cyl­
inders,-two in the conventional pOSition, and one underneath the
front of the bOiler, near the smoke box. Her working boiler pres­
sure was 250 lbs. and she had a tractive effort of 35,455 lbs. at
85% boiler pressure.
While the first four locomotives of the-A4 class had been
named Silver Link, ~Uicksilver, Silver King and Silver Fox,
for service with the Silver Jubilee express, the later engines
were named for wild birds, and thus it was that No. 4489 was intend­
ed to be named Buzzard. Although the name-plates had been pre­
pared, they were never used. vfuen No. 4489 went into service on
May 4, 1937, she was painted in shop gray and green, and carried
the name-plates Woodcock. This was a slight improv.ement on the
original name.
As Woodcock had been built for the Coronation express
service, she was returned to the works on r.1ay 17, to emerge a week
later painted a heavenly garter blue, with claret red wheels and a
black smoke-box front. She was a beauty indeed! At an impressive
ceremony on June !15, 1937, she was named Dominion of Canada by
the Honorable Vincent Massey, the then High Commissioner for Canada.
Mr. H. Nigel Gresler the designer and builder of the locomotive
and the Coronation express train, had been accorded the dignity
of Knight Bachelor in the Birthday Honours list of 1936. < He was
also present. The engine was staffed by Driver G. Burfoot and
Fireman R. Middleton. After the ceremony, during which the Honorable
Vincent Massey is reputed to have piloted Dominion of Canada on a
short run, a further special trip was performed on June 16, when
the guest of note in the Coronation train was the Prime Minister
of Canada, the Right-Honourable W. L. Mackenzie-King.
Prior to the inauguration of the Coronation service, a
press run from London to Grantham (Barkston North), 111.1 miles,
was arranged. Nothing like the Silver Jubilee tour de force was
attempted on the northbound trip with the 320 ton special train.
The 111.1 miles were run off in 93 minutes, 29 seconds net time.
This was almost according to the prearranged sohedule. However, on
the return trip, it was decided to go for broke and shoot for the
100. There was some reason, since two days previously the LMS
had touched their maximum of 114 m.p.h., with the 270 ton Corona­
tion Scot. And so, Burfoot turned on the power! Within a few
miles, D. of C. was doing 66 m.p.h., and on the 0.5% grade up to
The Dominion of Canada, resplendent in deep blue and oarrying
the Canadian coat of arms below the number on the oab, was e­
quiPped with a Canadi an;!. type locomotive whi stle and hauled the
Coronation between Kings Cross (London) and Edinburgh during
1937. Other engines iIi the group were Commonwealth of Aust­
ralia, Dominion of New Zealand, -Union of South Afrioa and
Empire of India.
CANADIAN -105 R A I L
Stoke, speed increased to 69 m.p.h. On the gently descending Stoke
Bank speed rose throush 86,80,92,97,100,102.9, and 107.5 to a maxi­
mum of 109.1 m.p.h. (mileposts 91 to 90) after which speed dropped
,off to 101 and 94.7 over the next two miles. Burfoot simply could
not get past the maximum of 109.5 m.p.h., and this was considerably
short of the LMS mark of 114 m.p.h. Mr. C. J. Allen (previously
referred to) said that an unhappy choice of engine had been made on
this occasion. It has been intimated elsewhere that D. of C.
never did perform as well as others of her class, but to quote
Ilr. Allen further, Nevertheless, in the load conditions, the fail­
ure was quite an honourable one.
The LNER s que st for speed was not yet complete. Domin­
ion of Canada had reinforced the opinion that all of these A4 en­
gines were capable of very high speeds. The top speeds achieved by
these engines had risen in proportion to the gradual development of
Sir Nisel Gresleys design technique:
Nov. 30, 1934 Al Class Flying Scotsman 100 m.p.h.
Mar. 5, 1935 A3 Class Papyrus 108 m.p.h.
Sept. 27, 1935 A4 Class Silver Link 112.5 m.p.h.
Aug. 27, 1936 A4 Class Silver Fox 113 m.p.h.
June 30, 1937 A4 Class Dominion of Canada 109.5 m.p.h.
July 7, 1938 A4 Class Mallard 126 m.p.h.
The competition was effectively silenced by one final,
glorious speed run on the LNER metals in July,1938. The locomotive
was another A4 class 4-6-2, Mallard, rebuilt with a double blast
pipe and doub1e chimney to improve her steaming power and to provide
a greater freedom of exhaust. The train was made up of six stream­
lined coaches and the synamometer car, for a total weight, with the
few passengers, of 270 tons. Starting on the old race-track south­
bound from Grantham, the engine worked up the 0.5% grade to Stoke
at 75 m.p.h., and then tipped over the summit and down the 0.5%
descending gradient of Stoke Bank. Acceleration was electrifying!
Speeds rose rapidly in successive miles from 87 to 96, to 104, to
107, Ill, 116 and 119 miles an hour. Then, at subsequent half-mile
intervals t.he train touched 120, 122.5, 123, 124.25 and 125 miles
an hour. Mr. C. J. Allen, who was a passenger (speed-timer) on
this run, records that for a very short distance the dynamometer
car roll, which records without the possibility of error, showed an
absolute maximum of 126 miles an hour. This was without doubt the
highest speed which has ever been reached on the rails in Great
Britain, and Mallard now proudly carries a pair of plaques which
commemorate this outstanding feat.
After 1938, just about everything else in the line of
high speeds by trains was anticlimactic. Within months, World War
II was declared, and this effecUvely terminated the brief, glorious
career of the Coronation and the streamlined A4s. These beauti­
ful trains were withdrawn and never reinstated. On one or two oc­
casions, since the end of World War II, the 100 m.p.h. mark has
been exceeded on the former LNER main llle –now the Eastern Region
of British Railways, but not with official approbation or encourage­
ment. The A4 class of locomotives per,formed yeoman service during
the war, and were variously modified. The valances covering the
wheels were removed –among the reasons given were to allow the
passage of air to the main bearing of the middle or third cylinder,
and also to allow greater accessability to the running gear, for
reuairs. Dominion of Canada was renumbered briefly about 1947 to
loby Mr. E. Thompson, the successor to Gresley. When the railways
CANADIAN 106 R A I L
o.f Britain were natio.nalized, she became No.. 60010, and hauled the
first Capitals Limited between Londo.n and Edinburgh o.n May 23,
1949. In 1956, DOminio.n o.f Canada, to.o., was re1:ullt with a do.uble
blast-pipe and chimney. By that time, British Railways had stand­
ardized o.n an o.verall green co.Io.ur fo.r express passenger engines.
This green has been vario.usly described as Brunswick, Swindo.n o.r
Great Western Green. As exterio.rally resto.red in 1967, Do.minio.n o.f
Canada is finished in this co.Io.ur.
It has been intimated that the Silver Jubilee and Co.r­o.natio.n
expresses were designed exterio.rally by the no.ted Italian
mo.to.r car builder,–Etto.re Buggatti, who. fo.r years has had a remark­
able reputatio.n fo.r his advanced mo.to.r car designs. It is kno.wn
that Sr. Buggatti was a perso.nal friend o.f Sir Nigel Gresleys, but
there is no. evidence to. sho.W that he participated directly in the
exterio.r design o.f either o.f these famo.us trains.
The A4 class o.f 4-6-2 LNER lo.co.mo.tives have been called
the finest flo.wering o.f English steam lo.co.mo.tive design. To. sub­
stantiate this statement, it sho.uld be remarked that during the 1948 lo.co.mo.tive
exchanges, when different engines fro.m the fo.ur majo.r
British Railways were carefully tested o.n each o.thers lines, the
A4 perfo.rmance surpassed all the rest. Thro.ugh the entire series
0. f exchange s, which have been examined in a great many -bo.o.ks and
technical papers, the average A4 co.al co.nsumptio.n (3.06 lb. per
drawbar-ho.rsepo.wer-ho.ur) and water co.nsumptio.n (24.32 lb. per draw­
bar-ho.rsepo.wer-ho.ur) were the lo.west o.f all the engines tested,
whether express passenger, mixed traffic o.r freigpt.
As a Po.stcript to. the fo.rego.ing, it is reco.rded in passing
tha t with the decisio.n o.f British Railv/ays, in 1948, tQ replace
steam lo.co.mo.tives by diesel-electric and electric tractio.n, mo.re
and more o.f this illustrio.us A4 class o.f lo.co.mo.tives began to. dis­
appear fro.m the railway scene in Britain. They, like the fero.cio.us
Scots befo.re them, were replaced o.n the Londo.n-Edinburgh run, o.nce
their exclusive territo.ry were driven back to. the no.rth behind
Hadrians Wall. In the no.rth, between Aberdeen and Glasgo.w, the
surviving few ended their distinguished service, in the autumn o.f
1966. Mallard had already been selected, resto.redand remo.ved to.
its resting place in Clapham Museum, Londo.n. Dwight D. Eisenho.wer
presently repo.ses by the windy sho.res o.f Lake Michigan, so.mewhere
o.n the o.utskirts o.f Chicago., in the United States.
By a series o.f remarkable Circumstances, no.ne o.f which
are quite lo.gical and all o.f which are truly memo.rable, Do.minion o.f
Canada emerged fro.m Crewe Wo.rks o.f British Railways on Wednes-
day, April 5, 1967, co.mpletely exterio.rally resto.red, in Brunswick 1 o.r Swindo.n o.r
Great Western green, thro.ugh the kindness of Messrs.
Tate and Lyle, Limited, Plaisto.w Wharf, Londo.n, England. . She was,
in the beginning, the gift o.f British Railways to. o.ur Asso.ciatio.n.
It was intended to. haul the refinished engine and tender o.ver the
main line fro.m Crewe to. Londo.n, but it was fo.und that she was to.o.
high fo.r the o.verhead electrificatio.n and was acco.rdingly mo.ved to.
Londo.n Do.cks by a ro.undabo.ut ro.ute. On April 6 o.r 7, the tender
was detached and lo.aded o.n Canadian PaCific Steamship Lines M.V. Beavero.al{. The
engine remained in the raih/ay yards adjacent to.
the do.ck until Mo.nday, April 10. She was unable to. approach do.ck-
side, being to.o. lo.ng fo.r so.me o.f the tight curves. The Po.rt o.f Londo.n
Autho.rity flo.atingcrane Hammo.th had to. carry her a co.n­
siderably lo.nger distance than had been o.riginally planned.
Dominion of Canada about to touch Canadian track for the
first time,. at the Port of Montreal.
Photo -C.P.R.
On Monday April 10 about 11 a.m., Dominion of Canada
was transferred by IvU. John Ratter, Hember, British Railways Board,
to ~1r. Geoffrey S. 1·1urray, Actine; High Commissioner for Canada.
FolloY/ing the ceremony, Tate & Lyle Limited were hosts at a recep­
tion at their nearby Plaistow Tharf Refinery. Illustrated accounts
of the ceremonr. appeared in the Daily Telegraph, the Nanchester
Guardian and The Times. There was also television and newsreel
coverage. CPSS I-L V. Beaveroak arrived in the Port of Montreal in
the early hours of April 24. After the upper holds had been cleared,
Dominion of Canada Y/as lifted carefully from the hold by St.
Lai~rence Sea,/ay Corporation floating crane Hercules and placed
gently on the National Harbours Board rails at dockside. From
there, Dominion of Canada went by easy stages to the Canadie.n
Railway Museum at Delson/St-Constant, Que.
Yes, Nr. I!iddleton, lie are very proud to have the Domi­
nion of Canada in our Museum, and we 1>/ill do our best to give her
the tender, lovinp; care and respect /hich she so -/ell deserves.
She is, indeed, the representative of a once powerful and still
proud class ,-the A4 s of the LNER. Vfe do feel justly proud, Hr.
11iddleton, of our Centennial Gift from Britain, and ,e ,ill take
good ca~e of her in her ne, home.
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During the latter part of this year, the Canadian National
Railways will be placing twenty five new Passenger vehicles
in inter-city services on the Southwestern Ontario Area.
(see Can. Rail Page 37). Tbey will be marshalled into five
trainsets of five cars each. To haul these trains, which
will be electrically heated, six diesel-electric units are
to be modified and equipped with supplementary electric gen­
erators. The locomotives are to be re-classified and re­
numbered (see Power, this issue) and given a new livery,
as detailed in the adjacent diagram.
The regular C.N. locomotive colours black, light grey,
and vermilion orange-red —are to be retained, but app­
lied to give the specially-equipped units a distinctive aP­
pearance.
Cabs are to have light grey sides and a black roof –hood
sides are to be vermilion red with aj 4 foot eN insignia in
light grey. The red is to ext~nd around the front, but not
over the top, which will remain black. Trucks and equip­
ment under the running boards will also be black, while the
road numbers and classification marks will be lettered upon
the light grey background of the cab in black.
Winnipeg Hydros 4-4-0 type steam engine, #3.
Winnipeg Hydro No.3 is shown at Lac Du Bonnet, Manitoba,
while on a special trip for ferroequinologists in October
1960.
Photo -Carl Gay
THE
CLAYDON CANNONBALL
Information supplied by: K. Gordon Younger
Thos. A.Downing
Sir: I am writing in regard to Alderman Leonard Clayton B
proposal to run old Winnipeg Hydro Steam Locomotive No. 3 on a tour
around the city as a centennial project. I, for one, am for it,
but alas, there are a few doubting Thomases on City Council who
want to vote thumbs down on the pr.oposal on the grounds that it
would cost the city around $8,000 •••••
The
above excerpt form a . letter to the Winnipeg Free Press,
signed by Mr. Garry Postad, sums up a situation which is boiling
in the City of Winnipeg concerning Winnipeg Hydros 4-4-0 steam
locomotive. Winnipeg Hydros No.3 was originally Canadian Pacific
locomotive No. 22, built by Dubs and Company of Glasgow in 1882,
a scant fifteen years following the confederation of Canada. The
City of Winnipeg has owned the locomotive since ~18 and has op­
erated it until recently. The engine. has be·en superbly maintained
and still boasts flat valves, square steam chests, and a nineteenth
century tender.
Right now it appears that Winnipegs Alderman Leonard Claydon
will remain steamed up –but that No. 3 will not. Alderman Clay­
don has been the driving force in trying to convince the Winnipeg
City Council to keep Canadas oldest operating steam locomotive
active. However, it has been calculated that a steam-powered tour­
ist train would incur an operating deficit of $8,000 over a three­
month period. Moreover,· oPIXlnents of the project maintain that the
fourteen-mile route proposed for the train is far from scenic.
Probably the glow of Number 3s . firebox and the white heat of
Alderman Claydon will be insufficient to raise steam in the majori­
ty of Winnipegs City Fathers who want merely to exhibit the prize
locomotive. Talk of frustration! For the sake of $8,000, an un-
spoiled example of a nineteenth century steam locomotive originally I
owned by the railway that was an integral part of the Confederation .
bargain and that has played a major role in Canadas development
since, a locomotive which is in good operating condition, will be
allowed to join the legion of inactive, inoperative, cold, museum
exhibits ·scattered across the country.
After all, Alderman, $8,000 can be put to good use on a sensi­
ble Confederation project such as those in other parts of Canada -­
something like a sports arena, or a skating rink, or maybe a water
fountain. .
1 11
.R READERS WRITB
~the February. 1967. issue. we referred to Canadian
Pacific locomotive 144 as being Canadas oldest locomotive; we
should have said that 144 is the oldest existing Canadian-built
locomotive. This ambiguity on our part is pointed out by a member
in the following letter:
P.O. Box 772, llontreal 3, Canada.
April 1st, 1967.
Mr. W.L. Pharoah,
Editor, CANADIAN RAIL,
P.O. Box 22, Station B,
MONTREAL 2, Canada.
Sir,
In a current issue of Canadian Rail, certain
statements are made in a museum report written by Mr.
Derek Boles with which I would like to take issue.
First of all, Canadian Pacific locomotive No.
144 at the museum is not the oldest engine in Canada.
That honour must fall to the locomotive Samson now
preserved at New Glasgow, N.S. Samson was built by
Timothy Hackworth at New Shildon, Durham, England and
brought to Nova Scotia in 1838 to work on the Albion
Colliery Tramway. There are several other locomotives
in Canada presently which are older than 144, among them:
CNR No. 40 (Museum Train built 1872
Countess of Dufferin

1871
LBSCR Waddon

1875 Curlyl!
believed

1879
City of Winnipeg No.3

1882
CPR No. 136

1883
SNCF No. 030 C 841

1883
Also, No. 144 was built in 1886 and not 1887 as stated.
No. 29 at the museum was built in 1887.
Secondly, the impression is given that the con­
dition of this locomotives boiler will allow it, in some
fashion, to circumvent the regulations of the Board of
Transport Commissioners. As far as the BTC is concerned,
this locomotive is due for a Class One overhaul before it
can be operated on any public railway. With a provincial
government boiler certificate, it may function on private
property only (i.e. the museum yard). Since this item
appeared, I have had several inquiries from interested
individuals wanting to know where it is to be operated,
assuming that this operation will take place on the lines
of the Canadian Pacific Hailway.
No. 144s individual distinction is that it is
believed to be the oldest Canadian-built locomotive still
in eXistence.
The third point which I would like to contest
is the statement that Canadian National No. 77 is destin­
ed for the Delson museum. I was the individual who int­
roduced the question of the acquisition of this unit on
behalf of the Ottawa Museum project to the Board of Dir­
ectors
J
and the President agreed to write Canadian Nat­
ional rtailways on behalf of that project. To the best of
my knowledge, this is still the understanding of the mem­
bership in Ottawa.
OSAL/ (Orner
Lavallee)
Member No. 89
W
E MADE A MISTAKE, and have been corrected by two astute oorres­
pondents, Messrs. R.F.Collin!J of Wyckoff, N.J. and Roderic E.
Righter of Birmingham, Mich. Both Mr. Collins and Mr. Righter
point out that the sleeping cars acquired by the Canadian National
from E-L were built in 1949 for the former Erie RR for use on the
ERIE LIMITED and the LAKE CITIES. They were named after persons,
important in the growth and development of that system.
Deliveries: up to April 21, 1967.
HOAD NUt1BSR
3232 3233 3234
3235 3236
DATE DELIVERED
March 27, 1967 March
28, 1967
April 5, 1967
April 12, 1967
April 18, 1967
Retirements: up to April 21, 1967.
IN
~III
BU I LDER S NUMBER
M-3477-11
~1-3477-12
11-3477-13
M-3477-14
~1-3477-15
For some strange reason the retirement date for the units
listed in #184 was not shown. Units 2200, 2205, 2212, 9300, 9306,
9316, 9338 were all writte~ off January 16, 1967 While units 3037
and 9450 were retired January 25, 1967 .. The following additional
locomotives have been removed from the roster.
lWAD
NU~iBER
SERIAL BUILDER BUILT RETIRED BUILDERS
MODEL
NOTES
912 920
1630 2202
2204 2206
2214 2215
2217
30)2
3035
94~6
A-900 A-908
2880 2864
2866 2868
2876 2877
2879
81027
810JO
776:33
GftD
GMD
CLC
CLC
CLC
CLC
CLe CLe
CLe
I1LW
MUJ
I~LW
1/9/56
19/9/56
19/8/55
30/3/55
7/4/55
18/4/55
20/5/55
20/5/55
31/5/55
30/9/5
4
14/8/54
25/5/51
14/4/67
14/4/67
14/4/67 14/4/67
14/4/67
14/4/67
14/4/67 14/4/67
14/4/67 14/4/67
14/4/67
14/4/67
NF-210 NF-210
H-12-44 H-16-44
H-16-44 H-16-44
H-16-44 H-16-44
H-16-44
RS-1600
RS-160o
F-1600
1
1
2
2
2
Locomotives 775, 776, 777, 3806, 3819, 3822 will recelv~ re­
tirement approval sho~tly.
1 )
2)
These units were on Train 20~ when it hit B switcher in Corner­
brook yard on September 1), 1966.
These units are NOT trade-ins to ~LW on CNs present order.
. . . . . ……. .
. . . . . ……. .
rhis months diagram is of the MLIV Century-630, two of which ~
have been ordered bv the CNR. They will have been delivered by the ~
time this issue hasbeen mailed.
114
MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT DIESEL UNIT [lATA BOOK
MR-30-a
2000-2001
CLASS
NUMBERS
DIESEL ENGINE:
–:mOO
1r.l.
WEIGHT
DISTRIBUTION
BUILDER
I
-L
•.
Aleo
251-~
V
T)pe
16
Cylinder
9
Bore
lot
stroke
llOO
R.P.M.
hll
Speed
FR
.MIN IREAR MINJ
TOTAL
~
FR.
MAX
. IREAR
MAX]
TOTAL
ORDER
Nil
LIGHT
MODEL
N
~
rc~t1l)
/:V
nAT! BUILT
I
LOADED
I
350,000
1-

I
.1
+-r1
~
;;:;
~
~~
I-+
h-h-h+-r++-l-:-hf—!h-l~.-l-Mt:-4–m-I-+.-Tf—L
L
:
:
i
.-if~
L
..
m:
~
. .
.
r
Jl
l
.,
~~
:~.
i~
~

,
–:-
A:
.
;
iif

~
c
;,
c
,.
J;

·t—=-
6
~
ll;~~_
:
f.~

-i-~
L
9
S–



….
-.

..
_.
9
l~-…l
~tg.t~
n_U
_
__
_
._
64
8

.-
–_


29–

… –
69
6 -…
–.-
-.
—-
.-



,-
It
.
~~~
F~
fl!rzr~~
n
;
.
11
·
….
~
..

Ij
.
~
8 0
~
(JI

~
l
CAPACITIES
.
I
WHEELS:
TYPE
&
CL
….
SS
STEAM
GENERATOR
ELECTRI
CAL
EQUIPMENT
ENG.
COOLING
WATER
390
U.S.~GAL
.
A-40 .OR
LUBRICATING OIL
250
IMP. GAL.
FUEL OIL
JOURNALS:
TYPE
&
SIZE
SAND STORAGE
SKIP
6f
x
12-
STEAM
GEN.
WATER
OPERATING FEATURES
~AX.
SPEED
75
·
M.P.H
GEAR RATIO
65:18
T.E.
STARTING
DPER.
CURVE
ALONE:
25
0
/COUPLED:
21
U:.
CONTINUOUS:
. 0
TRUCKS
High
Adhesion
None
A I R
COMPRESSOR
Westinghouse
3
CDaL
CO
OLiNG
FANS
One One
G!!
Mechani
cal
Dr1
ve
AIR
BRAKE
.estinghouse
26L
Uni
tized
TRACT
I
ON
MOTORS
Six
752
pe6
!AUXILIARY
GEN
:
TYPE&
N~
!wo
Gl!!
GY-?/1
IALTERNATOR :
TYPE
a.

~IT=
.7M7
.-
B~L
~
O~W~E
~
R~
~M~O~T==O=R~S-
Sturtevant Meohan1cal
MA
IN
GENERATOR
rnA
9 A
M.U.
CONTROL
Yes
DYNAMIC
BRAKE
Yee
116
Renumberings: up to April 21, 1967.
The renumbered locomotives for the Southern Ontario service,
3150 to 3155, are to be class MRE-18g. A diagram showing the new
paint scheme for these locomotives is found on page 106 •
Rentals: up to April 21, 1967.
DMIlocomotives have been returned -#132, 144, 145, 154, 161,
171 on March 13, 1967 and #127, 131, 133, 139, 163, 169, on .Mar.eh
20, 1967. They had been operatin~ on the Prairie Region. (Infor­
mation courtesy Charles S. De Jean). On Narch 28, 1967 the follow­
ing BLF. units were received at ~ort Erie for use out of Calder on
the ~1ountain Ree-ion.
ROAD SERIAL BUILDER BUILT RAIUJAY BUILDERS
NUMBER CLASS ~IODEL
712A 13682 EHD 3/51 W-4-A1 F-7
712B 13689 EMD 3/51 i~-4-B1 F-7B
713A 13683 EfiD 3/51 W-4-A1 F-7
714A 13684 EMU 3/51 W-4-A1 F-7
7148 13691 EMD
3/51
W-l~-B1 F-7B 716B
16599 E~1D 6/52 1-4-B2 F-7B
718B 16601
miD 6/52 l1-4-R2 F-7B
719A 16591 Efm 6/52 w-4-A2 F-7
They were sighted at Toronto on ~larch 28,by W.R. Linley, head-
ine; two different trains as follows:
First lriJ.in: 714A:712B:716B:719A.
Second rlra in : 713A:718B:714B:712A.
As well as this, two N&Ws are operating sporadically in
Southern Ontario. Numbers 3658 and 3662 were received March 2. On
March 10, #3666 was substituted for 3662. Later in April both
0nits were recalled by N&W bec~use they were short of power, but on
April 17, #3658 and 3671 resumed the CNservice.
Miscellaneous: up to April 21, 1967.
1 )
2 )
3 )
4)
5)
Units 3830 t~ 3849 ~re having their top speed changed from 65
to 75 mph.
All 9400 series locomotives have had their tractive effort
rating changed from 46,000 to 47,000 pounds.
Unit 3871 has hgd its top speed changed from 65 to 75 mph. Steam
locomotive 2534 whose storage location was not shown in
#184 has been seen outside Bellevilles roundhouse on March 25,
1967 by W.R. Linley.
More information from Mr. Linley tells us that TIR 500 is on
display, unfenced, outside ,the old TIR enginehouse in the Town
of Gananoque.
CN has ordered 110 new diesel-electric locomotives.
Forty-two of these will be Century 630 units from
Montreal Locomotive Works –sixteen of whioh are
soheduled for delivery before the end of the year.
It is reported that the other 68 units will be GMDs
model SD-40.
It ls regretted that due to clrcumstances beyond our control,
the rallway has been una.ble to supply further exact dellvery dates
and rental data. Qualltatlvely, however, lt may be sald that del­
iveries are up to 5562 at Aprll 21, 1967, (thls ls not a delivery
date), and that the number of leased units ls conslderably reduced.
Renumberlngs: up to Aprll 21, 1967.
The offlclal date for the changlng of #8557 (DRS-16e) to
4016 (DFA-15b) i~ March 14, 1966.
Mlscellaneous: up to !prll 21, 1961.
1) Steam locomotlves 1201 and ?858 left St. Luc yard on the even­
in~ of April 13, 1967 to go to Ottawa to the Natlonal Museum.
#3100 is belleved to have arrlved earller from Wlnnlpeg. All
three engines have been restored by the CPR.
Mlscellaneous: up to April 21, 1967.
1) The remainder of the unlts were returned to mlD for completlon
8.nd repalntlng on the dates shown. (Inf·:>rmatlon courtesy Charles
E. De Jean).
ROAD NUNBER
604
605
DATE RETURNED
11arch 7, 1967
March 15, 1967
ROAD NUNBER
606
607
DAT~ RETURNED
~larch 22, 1967
March 25, 1967
2) It ls lnteresttng to note that although GO 600 was not outshop­
ped untll December 31, 1966, the bullder r s plate bears the date
November, 1966.
Iridian Order: up to A9rll 21, 1967.
The Order for 30 locomotlves for the Indlan State Rallways
has been lncreased to 32 unlts.
by Derek Booth
From south of the border comes news of the activities
of several ex-CP steam locomotives. CP 1246 is now being
reconditioned in the shops of the Monadnock, Steamtown and
Northern railway for service on excursion trains. It will be
renumbered 124 and is expected to be operational by mid-summer.
In addition ex-CP 4-6-0 No. 972 has joined ex-CP 4-6-2s 1286
and 1238 on the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad operating .
excursions out of York, Pa.
CP and CN have announced plans for a joint $1 billion
development over the 170 acres of railway yards between Yonge
and Bathurst streets in Toronto. The development will take the
form of a hotel, office, apartment, transportation, trade and
cultural complex and construction could begin as early as 1969.
News from Iberville and Dorval tells of the fate of
two stations. In Dorval construction is well underway on
the new eN station to replace the 63 year old former Grand
Trunk Station, while at Iberville, Quebec, the CP station is
presently being dismantled.
The state of Vermont has lost another petition for
the restoration of rail passeng.er service in the state. Three
federal judges turned down the proposal despite the prospect
of increased rail traffic between New York and Montreal for
Expo 67.
Reports from the Maritimes indicate that Newfound­
land may lose its CN passenger service next year. CN has
announced plans to institute Newfoundlands first trans­
island bus service between Port aux Basques and St. Johns.
CN area manager G.D. McMillan said that the decision was
taken to eliminate present heavy losses on passenger service
(a 40 per cent drop in traffice between 1961 and 1966 with
no comparable reduction in costs) and to provide the people
of Newfoundland with an improved public transportation
system. He estimated that the bus trip from Port aux Basques
to St. Johns would take 12 hours compared with 22 hours by
tra in.
Information of the above newS items was contributed by
J.J. Hilton, L. Keiller and D.S. Robinson.
CANADIAN 119 R A I L
Also from Eastern Canada comes word that the Dominion
Atlantic Railway may completely abandon its passenger service, if
severe losses continue. The D.A.R. applied to the Board of Trans­
port Commissioners three years ago for permission to cut the service,
but was refused at that time. The downward trend in passenger traffic
has continued, however, and a new application for abandonment will
likely be made in the near future.
Canadian National has taken down the overhead electri­
fication between the Bridge over the now-abandoned Lachine Canal
and the Coach Yards adjacent to Victoria Bridge. The electrified
section between the Canal Bridge and Turcot was dismantled some
years ago. All that remains now of the 1942-43 electrification
scheme south of Central Station is the short stretch between the
passenger station and the Canal Bridge. No electrically-operated
movements have been observed on this section for the past year.
Incidentally, it appears that rails have been welded on the former
11ft-span over the Lachine ·Canal, indicating that the structure is
unlikely to ever lift again.
THE AUTO-AGREEMENT
dOllt mind sitting here all day \,Htchillg CAnadiaTl-uuili ems bciug shipped to Delroil!
CANADIAlr RAIL: Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Committee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Subscription includes Associate Membership: M.OO arumally.
PUBLICATIONS CONllITTEE:
E~ITOR, CANADIAN RAIL:
ASSOCIATE EDITOR:
NEliS EDITOR:
f!E~1BERSHIP EDITOR:
POWER EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
ME~1BERSI!IP CflAIRt~AN:
D.R. Henderson, Chairman
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
William Pharoah
Anthony Cleee;
Derek Booth
Derek Boles
Hurray Dean
John W. Saunders
J. A. !3eatty
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
We hope you wi II visit
expo67 {ff ~
MONTREAL .~ M-t- APR,28 -OCT.Z7.1967
OTTAWA VALLEY: Kenneth F. Chivers, Apt. 3, 67 Someroet st. W., Ottawa, Onto
PACIFIC
COAST: Peter Cox, 2936 W. 28th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
SASKATCHE.vANI J .S. Nicolson, 2306 Arnold st~, Saskatoon, Sask.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN: V.H. Coley, 11243 -72nd Ave., Edmonton, Alta.
FAR EAST: Iv.D. McKeowll, 900 Senriyama (Oaza), Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: John H. Sanders, 67 Ivillo, lay, Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyright 1967
Printed in Canada

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