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Canadian Rail 179 1966

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Canadian Rail 179 1966

C:;a a

)ffi~nn
July August
1966
Number 179
OTTAWA UNION
STATION CLOSES
story • Omer Lavallee
photographs •
Jim Sandilands
o Denis Peters
maps •
Anthony Clegg
~
CANADIAN
139
R A I L
I!!Iftl HE DEPARTURE of Canadian Nationals train No.5, the Panorama, at
~ 12:40 AM, E.S.T., on Sunday, July 31st, 1966, officially marked the clos-
ing of one of Canadas most familiar railway terminals, Ottawa Union
Station. A victim of town planners. who ordained that the needs of the
rail travelling public must come second to those of the aesthetics of Canadas
capital city. Ottawa Union was succeeded by the new Ottawa Station. two miles
from Confederation Square, where Canadian National and Canadian Pacific main
lines from Montreal formerly converged to cross the Rideau River, at Hurdman
tower. Fifty-four years and two months had elapsed since the structure had
been opened to the public on June 1st, 1912j at that time, it was known as Cen­
tral Station, and it was used, from the beginning, by trains of the Grand Trunk
Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway and the Ottawa lit New York Railway (NYC).
The 1912 station was on the site of an earlier structure, erected nearly sev­
enteen years earlier by J .R. Booth as a city-centre terminus for his Canada At­
lantic Railwayj this original station had been opened on December 3rd, 1895, and
had consisted of a few terminal tracks abutting against an old stone building used
previously by the federal government for militia stores. The proposals to build
a new, enlarged structure at this location began shortly after the Canada Atlantic
Railway had been purchased by the Grand Trunk Railway in 1904. By 1908, elab­
orate plans had been prepared for an imposing station and office building, along
with a major hotel. The enlarged facilities required by this development nec­
essitated negotiations with the Sparks estate to acquire lands originally ceded
to the government specifically as a reserve for the Rideau Canal. On January
7th, 1907, the Canadian government and the Grand Trunk Railway signed an agr­
eement under which the railway leased the canal reserve for 999 years at a ren­
tal of $1,100 per year, to be readjusted every 21 years. Moreover, the GTR
agreed to pay the Sparks es.tate $80,000 for the ceded lands release SO that it
could be used fo! railway terminal purposes. There were a number of other
provisions in this agreement, among them that the station to be erected would
cost at least $250,000 and that its facilities were to be made available to other
railways on equal terms, though under the control of the Grand Trunk.
Charles M. Hays, then Second Vice-President and General Manager of the
GTR met the Ottawa city council on February 11,1907, and asked for certain con­
cessions. In stating that the station would be worth about $ 250,000 and the hotel
between $1,250,000 and $1,500,000, he asked that the city agree to a fixed ass­
essment on the station of $150,000 and on the hotel $200,000 for twenty years as
a tax concession for twenty years. Ottawas city fathers demurred on the gr­
ounds that Ottawas largest hotel, the Russell House, had an evaluation of nearly
$400,000. Hays then agreed to a compromise proposal that the hotel assessment
would not exceed that of the Russell House.
The plans which he displayed for the new station envisioned a building with a
circular rotunda enclosing a waiting rOom, with other conCOurses, ticket offices
and passages opening from it. The main entrance was to be situated in Little
Sussex Street, which was to be widened to the same width as Sussex Street so
that street cars of the Ottawa Electric Railway and vehicular traffic could be
brought to the station entrance with ease. The station and hotel were to be con­
structed in a semi-Gothic stylej the station included a tall office-building in
its plans. Hays indicated that the construction of the hotel was entirely contin­
gent upon the property tax concession being made.
CANADIAN 140 R A I L
In the ensuing two years, plans for the station were ITlodified sOITlewhat and
the office building annex abandoned. Construction got under way on both struc­
tures in 1910 and they were opened in 1912. The hotel is, of course, the present
Chateau Laurier. The opening of Central Station, as it was then known, took
place at 7:00 AM, June 1st, 1912.
Previous Railway Facilities in Ottawa
The opening of this new and iITlposing edifice, with its coluITlned facade fac­
ing the Chateau Laurier hotel, represented the culITlination of six decades of ser­
vice into Ottawa by rail. It was on ChristITlas Day, 1854, that the first train on
the By town & Prescott Railway reached Ottawa, then known as By town, froITl
Prescott, SOITle 54 miles distant. There had evidently been a condition attached
to By towns financial support, making it necessary that a train should arrive in
what was destined to be the capital of Canada before the end of 1854. With his
precious supply of Welsh iron rails running short just as the track reached what
is now Ellwood, the irrepressible Robert Bell, the promoter and secretary of
the Bytown & Prescott, had wooden stringers laid as rails from that point to the
crossing of the Rideau River just a half mile from the site of Ottawas future
station in Sussex Street, between Botelier and Redpath. He selected his lightest
locomotive, an 0-4-0 tender engine named Oxford, built by the Boston Loco­
motive Works in 1854 and weighing only eighteen tons in working order with its
tender j the little Oxford steamed into By town on December 25th, giving the
residents of the town what would prove to be a most useful and durable Christ­
mas gift. In the following spring, further supplies of iron from the Ebbw Vale
works arrived, with which the wooden rails were replaced, and with the Rideau
Bridge cOITlp1eted, trains began to serve Ottawa through the station at Sussex
Street. This site was utilized for railway purposes for nearly one hundred and
ten years, being abandoned in June 1964 as part of a plan to utilize the area for
the construction of the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge.
Selection of the Sussex Street site for a railway station was considerably in­
fluenced by the gift of land for that purpose by one of the railways directors.
who operated a factory nearby. Nonetheless, it was quite unfavourable from a
traffic point of view, being situated below the Chaudiere Falls of the Ottawa
River. One of the purposes of the railway (renamed the Ottawa & Prescott in
1855, when By town became Ottawa) was to take traffic from the upper reaches
of the Ottawa, but its position below the falls necessitated land transportation
through the town –an impractical com:ept particularly for lumber and other
forest products. This, combmed with other factors forced it through a number
of unfavourable financial vicissitudes in the uncertain times of the late 1850s
and the early l860s.
The railway was given some impetus when Ottawa was chosen as the capital
of the new Dominion of Canada in 1867, and it was then reorganized as the St.
Lawrence & Ottawa Railway. The advent of Ottawas second railway, the Brock­
ville & Ottawa Railway Company, which opened a terminal at Broad Street, opp­
osite the Chaudiere Falls on September 15th, 1870, caused the St. L. & O. to
implement construction of its own branch, from Chaudiere Junction (Ellwood) to
the falls, in 1871.
The third railway to reach Ottawa was that of the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa
& Occidental, owned by the Province of Quebec, which completed a line from
CANADIAN 141 R A I L
Montreal to Hull in December, 1877. With its eyes on the upper Ottawa traffic,
the QMO&O continued its line to Aylmer and three years later, late in 1880, it
constructed the Prince of Wales Bridge across the river to what is now Ottawa
West. Freight interchange began immediately, but passenger trains did not use
the structure until January 17th, 1881. Later in 1881, the Canada Central Rail­
way, which had previously absorbed the Brockville & Ottawa Railway, was itself
integrated into Canadian Pacific Railway Company, newly-formed that year.
That part of the QMO&O, extending from Montreal to Hull, Aylmer and Ottawa
followed the CCR into Canadian Pacific, being purchased by CP in 1882. Ottawas
original railway completed Canadian Pacific acquisitions when it was itself leas­
ed by the transcontinental in September 1884.
The Canada Atlantic
The first link in what was subsequently to become the very extensive Canad­
ian National trackage into our capital city was inaugurated on September 13th,
1882, when the Canadian Atlantic Railway, a project of J.R. Booth, the lumber
king, was completed from Coteau, Que., into an Ottawa station located at what
is now the intersection of Elgin Street and the Queensway. The rails themselves
were continued westward for some distance as far as the St. Lawrence & Ottawa
Chaudiere Branch, where they turned alongside, following them to a freight ter­
minal at Lebreton Flats.
Ten years later, Booth was deep in negotiations with the city of Ottawa for a
passenger terminal in the central area, resulting in the opening of the old Cen­
tral Station on the site of the late Union Station, on December 3rd, 1895. The
facilities at this time are described as being very rudimentary, the railway
waiting room and ticket offices occupying only a portion of an old stone building
otherwise used as a milita store. The obtaining of this land necessitated an
agreement with the Sparks estate for the use of land granted originally as a
canal reserve, for railway purposes.
In the 1880s and 1890s, two independent railways, the Ottawa & Gatineau
Valley Railway and the Pontiac Pacific Junction Railway, had constructed lines
to the north and to the west, respectively, on the Quebec side of the Ottawa
River. To secure an entry into the city, both agreed to combine (as the Ottawa
Northern & Western Railway) and to construct a bridge across the Ottawa oppos­
ite the entrance to the Rideau Canal. This structure, the Royal Alexandra or
Interprovincial Bridge, was completed and opened to traffic on February 22,
1901, Owing to reluctance on the part of the Canada Atlantic, the tracks across
the bridge were us ed only for freight interchange with the CA R but in 1904, upon
sale of the Canada Atlantic to the GTR, arrangements were concluded to permit
trains of other railways to use the Central Station.
By this time, however, the ON&W had been leased by Canadian Pacific Rail­
way (on November 1st, 1902), and its passenger services diverted into the
CPR station at Broad Street, at this time called Union Station, Takeover of
the Canada Atlantic by the Grand Trunk did, however, permit Canadian Pacific
trains of the M&O Subdivision from Montreal via Vankleek Hill to use the stat­
ion, as well as those of the Ottawa & New York. The M&O line had been com­
pleted to a connection with the Sussex Street line at Hurdman on July 19th,
1898. The O&NY was finished to Ottawa only two weeks later, on July 29th, 1898.

ABOV E: Framed by the trees of The Driveway, a Canadian National train from
Montreal approaches Ottawa Union Station near Deep Cut. (DP)
LEFT, (Top): Ottawa Union Station raises its distinctive pillared facade
above Confederation Square. (DP)
(Bottom): A dramatic night view of the street entrance side of the
new Ottawa Station, taken just a few hours before it opened its doors for
the first time. (JS)

ABOVE:
Hi
gh
platform
canopies
and
br
illiant
illumination
give
an
impression
of
spaciousness
to
the
new
Ottawa
Station.
Passen
g
ers
ga
in
access
to
the
five
throu
gh
tracks
through
an
undergroun:!
passageway
from
the
station,
at
ri
g
ht.
(JS)
BELOW:
Canadian
National
train
#1,
Super
Continental
,
makes
its
last
approach
through
the
stat­
ion
yard
of
old
Ottawa
Union
on
Saturday,
July
30th,
1966.
(JS)

.:l.
ABOVE
An
otho

vi.~
of
the
Sop
contiMntal,
ta
k•n
twO
wk,
b.f,
tho
,l.,in,
of
tho
.tatlo~
,h~
tho
pio,
.i.n~ot
of
tho
.pp
….
h
….
k.
bid.
tho
hi
….

Rld
O
C.n.
l
,
on

m.in
ty
of
,ammO<
.
,.mmoni,.ti=,
open.d
by
Col
on
•l
By
in
ZS.
Th

ad
nOW
b.ln,
,.n.t,o,t.d
who<
the
….
k
…..
h~n
in
thi.
photo,,,ph
will
b.
known
co
lona1
By
Drive.
(JS)
BELOW
canOdi~
National
..
a
in

50
continan
,
..
in
,
Ott.
wa
Un;on
on
tho
l
..
t
day
of
service.
July
30th.
1966.
(JS)

~
~


:
~
..-::;-
;,.,
.–
.
..
CANADIAN 148 R A I L
Before Booth opened his Central Station, however, he had under way the const­
ruction of the Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound Railway, whose initial section,
taking off westward from the Chaudiere spur on the alignment of what is now the
Queensway, was opened to Arnprior in May 1893. It eventually reached Parry
Sound and Depot Harbour in December 1896.
Developments Subsequent to Central Station
Upon its opening in 1912, the new station handled trains of the Grand Trunk,
Canadian Pacific transcontinental and M&O Subdivision trains, and those of the
O&NY –the New York Central in Canada. The Canadian Northern system,
which had arrived in Ottawa on November 30th, 1909, contented itself with a
rather unostentatious wooden structure in the east end of the city, off Gladstone
Pvenue near the NYC terminal. The same system built a railway from Ottawa
to Toronto, opening the section from Napanee to Ottawa (Hurdman) on December
30th, 1913. The last new railway extension into Ottawa was another Canadian
Northern line, that of its transcontinental route, which was opened from Pem­
broke to Federal in November 1916.
In 1912, though all of its traffic was Canadian Pacific, the old Broad Street
Union Station handled a considerably greater number of trains than the new
Central depot, but during and after World War I, consolidation of traffic at the
new facility took place, and in January 1920, Canadian Pacific closed its Broad
Street passenger terminal and transferred all services to the GTR station.
Subsequently, the Grand Trunk changed the name of its station to Union Station
which it carried to the end. Canadian Northern was absorbed by the new Canad­
ian National Railways in 1918, and with the taking-over of the GTR by the Nat­
ional system in 1923, all CN trains were diverted into Union Station. Subsequent­
ly, however, the New York Central, in an economy move, diverted its trains
from Union Station and thereafter terminated services at a small station at its
yard and engine facility at the corner of Gladstone and Nicholas.
With this exception, the railway terlninal situation in Ottawa remained stat­
ic for thirty years, until the NYC abandoned passenger service into the capital
in 1954. In February 1957, its line was completely abandoned.
In the interim, following the conclus ion of hostilities in the second World
War, federal authorities were at work on a master plan to rationalize and beau­
tify the capital city. The multiplicity of railway lines was a prime target in such
a project, as might be expected, and the relocation or elimination of many cross­
city routes was the subject of early consideration. Plans were set afoot about
1950 which, while they did not contemplate removal of Union Station to the out­
skirts, they did envisage removal of several lines in midtown Ottawa:
(a) The original Canada Atlantic line, by now the CN Renfrew Subdivision, from
Deep Cut, east of Union Station, to Bells Corners.
(b) Ottawas original railway, the CP Sussex Street Subdivision, from Sussex
Street to Hurdman.
(c) The original St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway Chaudiere Branch, now a part
of the CPs Prescott Subdivision, from Ellwood to.Ottawa West.
CANADIAN 149 R A I L
The idea of the formation of an Ottawa terminal railway company. first mooted in
1905. was revived with the intention of combining CN and C P traffic in the area
of the capital onto single railway arteries. Also in the books was a new freight
yard at Walkley Road south of the city. to replace Canadian National facilities at
Bank Street on the Renfrew Subdivision. and Canadian Pacific yards at Sussex
Street and at Ottawa West.
Construction of Walkley Yard was begun in 1950 and the yard fully opened in
1955. It was built on a belt line opened in 1953 which connected the CP M&O
Subdivision and the CN Alexandria Subdivision on the east. with the CP Prescott
Subdivision. and the CN Beachburg and Smiths Falls Subdivisions on the west.
This permitted planning of track removal in the midtown area. the decision being
made to use the right-of-way of the Renfrew Subdivision as a site for the Queen
Elizabeth Way trunk road. Abandonment of the Renfrew Subdivision east of Bells
Corners came gradually;
1953 -Nepean to Island Park Drive.
1955 -Island Park Drive to the Chaudiere spur switch.
1962 -Chaudie re switch to Deep Cut (not including wye).
1963 -Deep Cut wye.
The plan to dispense with the CP Prescott Subdivision from Ellwood to Ott­
awa West was found to be impractical owing to the existence of industries in the
neighbourhood of Ottawa West. and the necessity to construct a new railway br­
idge over the Ottawa to the Quebec side somewhere east of the city. Accordingly,
a change in the master plan was authorized. retaining this line but relocating it
on a grade separation alignment which would carry it in a tunnel under Carleton
University campus and the Rideau River and Canal. This project got under way
in 1960 and while it is now es s entially complete. the rails have not been laid as
yet and trains (including CP Lachute Subdivision passenger trains from Ottawa
to Montreal from the new Ottawa Stl.tion) still use the old surface route.
The Sus s ex Street Subdivision of Canadian Pacific. Ottawa s original railway
line. was also abandoned in two stages:
1964 -Sussex Street to Beechwood Avenue
1966 -Beechwood Avenue to Hurdman
The changes effected thus far in 1966 include;
(a) Abandonment of CN lines from Ottawa Union to Hawthorne via Hurdman.
(b) Abandonment of CP line from Hull to Ottawa Union and from Deep Cut via
Hurdman to M&O Junction. Also Sussex Street Subdivision from Smyth
to Hurdman.
(c) Construction of new trackage from M&O Junction to Hawthorne. and on
site of former Beachburg Subdivision from Smyth to new Ottawa Station
on an elevated alignment.
Construction of the approach trackage to Ottawa Station necessitated a few
temporary reroutings of trains using Ottawa Union in the weeks preceding the
changeover. The building of the connection from M&O Junction to Hawthorne
Continued on Page 160
The tables below and on the opposite page show the services which a smaller
capital city demanded in the pre-highway age. fifty-three years ago. Union
Station was then known as Central Station. the term Union Station having
been assumed by the depot in Broad Street in an earlier day when it served
three railway companies subsequently incorporated into the CPR. Trains
using Central Station at this period include some now long gone. such as the
daily service to Swanton Over the former Canada Atlantic. and the daily-except­
Sunday train between Ottawa and Depot Harbour over the Ottawa. Arnprior &
Parry Sound Railway. a Booth appendage.
1913
Ottawa Train Service
CENTRAL STATION
Train Freguenc;y Time (EST) Origination Destination
CP 19 Daily Ar. 12:50a Montreal £
CP 19
..
Lv • 12:50a C Sault Ste .Marie
CP 1
tt
Ar. 1:30a Montreal .£
CP 1
..
Lv • 1:30a C Vancouver
CP 20
tt
Ar. 5:00a @C Sault Ste .Marie
CP 20
..
Lv. 5:00a Montreal .£
CP 2
tt
Ar. 5:55a @C Van cOuver
CP 2

Lv. 5:55a Montreal £
NYC 21 Exo .Sunday Lv. 7:50a Tupper Lake
GT 22 Daily Lv. 8:30a Montreal III
CP 502 Lv. 8:30a Montreal £
GT 51 Ex!! .Sunday Lv. 8:35a Madawaska
NYC 20

Ar. 11: OOa Tupper Lake
GT 24

Ar. 11: 05a Madawaska
GT 29 Daily Ar. 11: 30a SVlanton
CP 501
..
Ar • 11: 35a Montreal .£
CP 509
tt
Ar. 11:59a Montreal .£
GT 23
It
Ar. 12:15p Mon trea 1
GT 24
tt
Lv. 3:l5p Montreal
CP 508

Lv. 3:30p Montreal .£
NYC 23

Lv. 4:35p Tupper Lake
GT 26 Exc .Sunday Ar. 4: 45p Depot Harbour
GT 30 Daily Lv. 5:00p SWanton
GT 23 Exo .Sunday Lv. 5:02p Madawaska
NYC 22
..
Ar • 6:35p Tupper Lake
CP 504 Daily Lv. 6: 45p Montrea 1 .£
GT 25 Exc.Sunday Ar. 7:10p Montreal
CP 503

Ar. 7: l5p Montreal .£
GT 54
tt
Ar. 7:20p Madawaska
GT 28

Lv. 8:00p Mon trea 1
CP 507 Sunday only Ar. 11: 05p Montreal £
GT 27 Daily Ar. 11: 15 p Montrea 1
GT 31
Exc.sundaK Lv. 11:30a Depot Harbour
~ -To Ottawa Broa Street
@!lC!)-From Ottawa Broa d S tre e t
.£ -Via Vankleek Hill.
BROAD STREET
Tra in Freguenc~ Time (KST 1 Origina tion Destination
CP 19 Daily Ar. 1: 15a @ Mon trea 1 £
CJ> 19 Lv. 1:30a Sault Ste .Marie
ell 1

Ar. 1:55a
@ Montreal £
CP 1

Lv. 2:05a Vancouver
CP 20 Ar. 4:20a Sault Ste .Marie
CP 20 Lv. 4:35a C!I@ Montreal [;
OP 2 Ar. 5:15a Van couver
CP 2 Lv. 5:30a @@ Montreal [;
CP 561 Exc .Sunday Lv. 7:25a Bro ckville
OP 543
..
Lv. 7:30a Waltham
CP 550

Lv. 7:30a Pre s co t t
CP
34 Daily Ar. 7:50a Toronto
OP 420

Lv. 8:30a Montreal
%
CP 557 Exl!.Sunday Lv. 8:30a Pembroke
C1 531 Daily Lv. 9: OOa Maniwaki
OP 542 Exo.Sunday Ar. 9:30a Waltham
01 560 Datly Ar. 10:00a Bro ckvi lIe
C? 551 Exo.Sunday Ar. 10: 05a Prescott
CP 563

Lv. 10:25a Brockville
01 571 Sunday only Lv. 10:25a Brookville
CP 532 Exc.Sunday Ar. 10:44a Maniwaki
C1 556 Ar. 1l:25a Pembroke
CP 421 Daily Ar. 1:15p Montreal ;6
CP 35 Exc.Sunday Lv. 1:55p North Bay
01 36
..
Ar. 2: 45p North Bay
CP 552
It
Lv. 3:50p Pre scot t
CP 553
It
Ar. 4:50p Prescott
Cll 559

Lv. 5:00p Pembroke
ell 562

Ar. 5:00p Brockville
CP 572 Sunday only Ar. 5:00p Brookville
OP 541 Exc.Sunday Lv. 5:05p Waltham
CP 531

Lv. 5:30p Maniwaki
ell 422 Daily Lv. 5:45p Montreal
%
CP 534 Exc .Sunday Ar. 5:45p Maniwaki
CP 558 Ar. 6:l0p Pembroke
C1 544

Ar. 6:15p Wal tham
CP 565 Daily Lv. 6: 45p Bro ckvi lIe
CP 535 Sunday only Ar. 9:25p Maniwaki
CJ> 564 Exo.Sunday Ar. 10:05p Brookville
OJ> 423 Daily Ar. 10:30p Montreal f,
ell 33
..
Lv. 10:45p Toron to
C!I -From Ottawa. Central Station. @@-To Ot taws Cen tra 1 ~tation.
[; -Via Vankleek Hill.
% –
Via Lachu til.
C.N.R. STATION
Fre que nc ~ Time (EST l
CNR 34 Exc.Sunday Ar. 11:00a
CNR 35 Lv. 5: OOp
Origination Destination
Jollette
Joliette
L A
I(
£
l
I
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.
ABOVE:
Canadian
Pacific
train
#
I,
Canadian,
on
the
north-to-west
curve
at
Hawthorne
on
July
30th,
1966,
during
a
temporary
rerouting
necessitated
by
the
cutting
of
the
CP
M&O
Subdivision
trackage
into
Ottawa
Union
in
order
to
divert
them
into
the
new
facility.
US)
BELOW;
The
same
train,
the
last
westbound
Canadian
to
use
Union
Station,
coasts
easily
onto
the
Royal
.Alexandra
Bridge
for
the
last
time.
This
view
was
taken
from
Parliament
Hill.
(JS)

A
BOVF
:
Canndi
tln
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TOP: St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway #2, Ottawa, built in 1854, was one
of the first locomotives ever to reach Canadas capital. Picture was
taken in 1862. (OSAL collection)
BOTTOM: The business end of Broad Street station shows a distinct affinity
to contemporary Canadian Pacific structures, such as Palais Station in
Quebec, Windsor Station in Montreal and the old Vancouver station.
(OSAL collection)
RIGHT: Ottawa Union trainshed was frequently used to store dead pass­
enger equipment such as this Canadian National sleeping car shown in
the upper photograph. Trainshed construction is clearly shown. At the
new station, as shown in the lower photo of Canadian Pacific standby
equipment, the pas.senger sidings are situated adjacent to the station
where the cars are not infrequently bathed in the light of a full moon. (JS)

CANADIAN
160
R A I L
in July permitted abandonment of the CPR M&O Subdivision from M&O Junction
into Ottawa. and its rerouting as the main line into the east end of Ottawa Stat­
ion. During this period. CPR M&O Subdivision trains followed the route;
M&O Jc.-Hawthorne-Hurdman-Deep Cut-Union Station. Similarly. for a few
days following the inauguration of the new facilities. an incomplete westward
main line on the site of the old Beachburg Subdivision required all westbound
trains. CN as well as CPo to leave the new station from its east end. and proceed
to western and northern main lines via Walkley Yard.
A full description of the new station and its facilities will be given la-ter.
CANAL Sf
GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY
OTTAWA TCRMlNALS
119081
r.RAND TRUNK RAILWAY
OTTAWA TERMlNALS
119111
.. O,-=K
The author regrets the delay in bringing
information. However, keeping up to nate has
by the uncertain deadline of Canadian Rail.
what appears in October is new news, although
forth the following
been made difficult
It is hoped that
what follows is not.
ERRATUM
The following errors and misprints appeared in Power in
Number 174:
1) The builders number for CP 4008 is not 77304,but rather
77303.
?) The builders number for CP 4009 is not 77305, but rather
7730
1
-1-.
3) The builders number for CP 4420 is not 77342, but rather
77341.
4) Information pertaining to the LSIs should be as below:
ROAD NUMBER
1503
1606
1803
1804
BUILDERS NUMB~H
76804
80478
835
47
84293
BUiLDERS JliODEL
RS-2
RS-3
RSD-12 RSD-12
BUILT
13/
4/49
20/5/53
13/11/59
1/4/63
5) ~Jara thon s locol!lot i ve was ou t shopped on February 11, 1966
and carries road number 28-120.
6) The closing date for the GTlv section was January 28, 1966.
7) CP class DRF-24c extends from 4233 to 4250, not from 4233
4237 only.
8) The closing date for the CP leasings was uecember 20,1965.
In addition, these misprints appeared in Number 175:
1) CP 5025 was rebuilt from 1906, not 2906.
2) The first unit of eN class MR-10b listed (page 63) is 1706
not 2706.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
Purchases: up to ~Tay 5, 1966.
DL-640As were delivered as follows:
3202 ••••• !larch 24, 1966 3204 ••••• March 25, 1966
3203 ….. ~larch 24, 1966 3205 ….. ray 3, 1966
Unit 320LJ. was Qutshopped unfinished due to a strike pending at
foontreal Locomotive :orks. The final worl{ was performed at eNs
Montreal Yard.
Although 3205 was outshopped May 3, it was not delivered to CN
until May 4.
Two locomotives are being kept by CN from the London and Port
Stanley Ral.lway. Data is shown on the next page.
CANADIAN 162 R A I L
LPS CN CN HOHSE_ BUILDsn BUILT
ROAD NUIIBER IWAD NUliBER CLASS POWER
L-4 991 GR-12zb 1310 GMD 14/9/1955
L-5 992 GR-12zb 1310 GND 15/7/1957
These B-B export locomotlves will be standardized
horsepower at their first major shopping.
to
Scrappings: up to ~ay 5. 1966.
ROAD
NUlmER
1
74 2207 2209 22
11
2213 2216 2900 3003
3029
3058
3060
3079
3087
3807
8450
9303 9304 9308 9318 9320 9322 9342 9344 9403 9412
STATION
Symington
Deerholme
llontreal
liontreal
Montreal
~Jontreal
Montreal
Montreal
Moncton
~1oncton
f1oncton
f~oncton
Moncton Moncton
Noncton
If:oncton
Nontreal
lJontreal
liontreal
~iontreal
r:ontreal
lontreal
Montreal
Nontreal
~)oncton
fioncton
OUT OF
SERVICE
In Service
17/1/66
4/3/64
2/6/65
1/2/66 2
4/11/6
1,
25/1/65
1/2/66
1/4/66
4/1/66
4/1/66 4/1/66 4/1/66
22/4/66
9/1/64
23/7/65
7/2/64
26/1/66
1/2/65
27/1/66
7/2/66
29/4/65
3/4/66
RETIRED
15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
6/5/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
28/3/66
15/3/66
2/5/66
10/2/66
10/2/66
10/2/66
10/2/66
2/5/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66 15/2/66 15/2/66 15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
15/2/66
6/5/66
aUILT
21/5/47
4/47
18/4/55
25/
4
/55
9/5/55
13/5/55
31/5/55
19/8/55
20/11/53
24/9/54
1
2/7/55
14/7/55
15/11/56
28/12/56 20/10/55
5/11/51
29/5/52 29/5/52
2/12/52
23/12/52
31/12/52 31/12/52
12/3/53
12/3/53
25/5/50
28/2/51 BUILDERIS
NUf1BER
28349 28688 2869 2871 2873 2875 2878 24-L-862 79127 81024
81175 81177 81586 81594 81212
77757 2670 2668 2697 2702
2703
2704 2714 2715 77298 77626
£ -units so marked were traded-in to MLW for DL-640As.
o _ converted to B-14 to be assigned to Symington.
@ -sold to Vancouver vlharves I-jay 27, 1966.
1200
NOTES
@
£
£
i.
£
£
£
£
o
£
£
NOTE: Retired units are not necessarily scrapped. Some are kept
for cannibalization purposes.
Rentals: up to May 5, 1966.
All rented units had been dispatched home by the end of Karch,
except the B&M switchers which were turned over to CPo Montreal
stationed mlIR I s returned to Otta~Ja as sho~m below:
LOCOMOTIVE TRAIN DATE
LOCOMOTIVE TRAIN DATE
133 407 22/3/66
1~7 407 2/)/66
138 407 7/3/66
143 401 8/3/66
CANADIAN 163 R A I L
LOC0110TIVE THAIN DATE LOCO~iOlIVE TRAIN
401
401
DATE
147
149
151
407
401
407
2/3/66
22/3/66
8/3/66
170
174 29/3/66
8/3/66
Train 401 leaves Montreal Yard at 12:30AM, while Train 407
leaves Montreal Yard at 1:00PM.
Miscellaneous: up to Nay 5, 1966.
1) The following additional ME-10 locomotivRs have been
placed on four-wheel trucks: 1718, 1720.
2) Readers may recall a great controversy about the horse­
power of 1719 in Numbers 151 and 153. It turned out that the unit
had been equipped with an experiment81 englne, supposedly for a
perlod of two years. The locomotive was outshopped from MUI ~Ii th
a 260 engine (1200HP) on December 7, 1961. The unit had its 539
engine (1000HP) replaced and was outshopped April 2, 1965.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Purchases: up to September 17, 1965.
Canadlan Pacific has
London, Ontario to be
schedule ls shown below.
ordered 32 locomotives from GMDL in
built to Model SD-40. Expected dellvery
July 1966 ………. 2 units
August 1966 •……. 8 units
September 1966 •••.• 8 units
Rentals: up to April 1, 1966.
October 1966 •.••••• 3 units
November 1966 ••••.• 3 unlts
0ecember 1966 ••.••• 8 units
The railway has acquired all the Boston and Maine switchers
that CN had previously been using: numbers 1178, 1179, 1181, 1263,
1268,
and 1270. In addition, another GP-7, #1573, was rented from
the BM1. All BLE, mlIR, and LSI units have been returned to their
owners.
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
COVER PHOTO
The Chateau Laurier and the trees of Majors Hill Park form a backdrop
for a pair of Canadian Pacific RDC cars on the afternoon train to Mon­
treal, as they leave Canadas capital for its metropolis via the Royal
Alexandra Bridge. The abandoned spans in the gully bridge are the last
remnants of the Hull Electric Railway whose wooden interurbans ceased
operating into their Ottawa terminal underneath Confederation Square
back in 1947. (Photo by Jim Sandilands)
MARCH OF PROGRESS
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
Shh! Hes trying to figure out when will the Brotherhood let him buy another Diesel!.
CANADIAN RAIL: Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Committee. Canadian Railroad Historical
Association. P.O. Box 22. Station B. Montreal 2. Canada.
Subscription includs Associat Membership: $4.00 annually.
PUBLICA TIONS COMMITTEE:
ACTING EDITOR. CANADIAN RAIL:
ASSOCIA TE EDITORS:
EDITORIAL STAFF:
DISTRIBUTION:
MEMBERSHIP CHAIRMAN:
ASSOClA TION REPRESENTA TIVES;
D.R. Henderson. Chairman.
J.A. Colli ns.
W.L. Pharoah.
Omer Lavallee
Anthony Clegg. William Pharoah
Derek Boles. James Sandilands. Ian Webb.
John W. Saunders. Wayne Hughes
Michael Leduc.
OTTAWA VALLEY; Kenneth F. Chivers. Apt. 3. 67 Somerset St. W •• Ottawa.
PACIFIC COAST: Peter Cox. 2936 W. 28th Avenue. Vancouver. BC.
SASKA TCHE WA N: J .S. Nicolson. 2306 A rnold St •• Saskatoon. Sask.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN: V.H. Coley. 11243 -72nd Avenue, Fdmonton, Alta.
FAR EAST: W.O. McKeown. 900 Senriyama (Oaza). Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: John H. Sanders. JO Church St .• Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyright 1966 Printed in Canada On
Canadian paper.

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