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Canadian Rail 175 1966

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Canadian Rail 175 1966

C:an.a
) ffi.miill
march
1966
No. 175
the cover
T HIS YEAR marks the half-century birthday for Canadian Nat­
ionals valiant and sturdy little Z-l-a class electric loco­
motives. Thei.r entire careers have been spent shuttling
back and fOrth through Montreals Mount Royal Tunnel (at 3.3
miles, second longest in Canada) at the head end of bustling and
loaded commuter trains whose vintage passenger cars outwardly
belie marks of ancestral private companies. The locomotives and
their trains are fighting a losing battle; inevitably, as rush hour
follows rush hour, the numbers of those who clamour for the use
of this transit umbilical cord increase. Informed observers real­
ize that consists can not be effectively enlarged nor head ways
shortened. CN has pointed this out to its patrons, who in turn
have tried to spur their politicians on to back a transit plan which
would see conventional rapid transit electric trains replace
Canadas only main-line electrification. Inevitably too, the polit­
icians have dallied, but will not postpone action much longer for
at least one good. simple reason: many of these same function­
aries are among the passengers who, more frequently as time
goes on, get left behind on a suburban platform because the 8 :12
just wont take any more passengers.
Some day, inexorably, the end will come. Meanwhile, savour
the atmosphere of Montreals wintry, evening suburbia. just cold
enough so that the snow squeaks underfoot, captured admirably on
film by our own Jimmy Sandilands, as No. 103 pauses at Mount
Royal Station to disembark commuters. The photographers fond
hope is that at least one of the electrics will be preserved when
the last pantagraph is finally hauled down.
P.S.: We hope so. too!
1966 executive
THE SLA TE of candidates proposed for the 1966 Directorate
of the Association by the Nominating Committee being un­
contested, the following twelve members were elected by
acclamation; from this governing body, five officers were select­
ed, as indicated in parentheses following the appropriate name.
Messrs. J.A. Beatty, C.S. Cheasley, J.A. Collins (Secretary).
D.R. Henderson, O.S.A. Lavallee (Vice-President). M.D. Leduc.
R.V.V. Nicholls (President). W.L. Pharoah. M.A. Rogel. C. Viau
(Vice-President). A.S. Walbridge (Treasurer). S.S. Worthen.
CANADIAN
47
R A I L
EDITORIAL
Whaf albouf 19671
With the beginning of Canadas centennial year scarcely nine months away.
we may be forgiven for wondering out loud if any of the railway amateur
or historical groups in Canada –including our own –has given any
thought to the matter of railway his torical commemorations in 1967.
Surely this is an unparallelled opportunity to demonstrate unity by planning
and executing joint projects such as the observance of memorable events
on the appropriate anniversary days. and visiting historic sites. utilizing
special train movements where possible.
It is incumbent on the rail hobby fraternity. we suggest. to endeavour to
keep continually before the public eye. the impressive role which railways
have taken. and are continuing to take. in the evolution of Canada as one of
the worlds most prosperous nations. and particularly sO in our countrys
centennial year. Unfortunately. absence of concrete planning in this dir­
ection and at this late stage. is one example where traditional Canadian
reticence as far as patriotic manifestations is concerned. dOes us an acute
disservice. We may be sure that a year of comparable significance in the
annals of the great republic to the south. would evoke a series of railway
fairs. national conventions and other extrav.aganzas that would put the rest
of us. even in our most lucid moments. to shame; it would hardly be sur­
prising if some of our good rail amateur friends below the line are not.
even now. planning ever so tentatively for 197b.
Our challenge. however. is only nine months away. There is no time to be
lost. Has anyone the courage to start the ball rolling ?
–Omer Lavallee
inbtrt Altnn 1£mtfanU
The Canadian Railroad Historical Association records,
with regret, the sudden. accidental death of the Presid­
ent and Chief Operating Officer of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, Mr. Robert Alton E.merson. on Sunday. March
13th, 1966. Mr. Emerson. a respected and competent
railwayman and a good and sympathetic friend of our
A ssociation. was 54 years of age. The words of Mr.
N.R. Crump are particularly appropriate at this time.
his early death ………. re:noves an outstanding Canadian
and an outstanding Company officEr.
It. 31. ,.

CANADIAN 49 R A I L
… For 141 days in 1931, Canada boasted–
The Fastest Train In the World-
&v Orner Lavallee.
11 N RECENT DA YS, since the discontinuance of the passenger train pool arr-
11 angement between Canadian National and Canadian Pacific systems, quite
a· number of inquiries have come acrOss my desk respecting the validity of
the claim that, in the pre-pool period before 1933, Canadian Pacific Railway
operated the fastest scheduled train in the world. It should be said at the outset
that the claim is indeed perfectly valid, and can be substantiated by referring to
pUblished schedules. The period in question was from April 26, 1931 to Sept­
ember 13, 1931, both dates inclusive, and the service was Canadian Pacific train
No. 38, THE ROYAL YORK, scheduled to run from Smiths Falls, Onto to Mon­
treal West, Que., a distance of 124.0 miles in 108 minutes. This was an average
start-to-stop speed of 68.9 miles per hour.
The facts are these. In the spring of 1931, the worlds speed record for a
scheduled train was held by the renowned Cheltenham Flyer of the Great
Western Railway of England; this train, pulled by a light 4-6-0 of the Castle
Class, averaged about 200 tons in weight and was timed to effect the 77.3 miles
eastward from Swindon to Paddington Station, London, in 70 minutes, an average
speed of 66.3 miles per hour. This train was proudly advertised as the worlds
record holder and was the subject of frequent discussion and locomotive timing
recorded in the pages of the Railway Magazine and other kindred publications.
At this time. there appeared to be no serious contenders for the distinction
held by the British train, least of all in Canada. As far as the Montreal-Toronto
service was concerned. the Canadian Pacific Railway had four schedules daily
in each direction, as follows:
Route Depa~ Montreal-Toronto Toronto-Montreal
(a) Morning #37 THE ROYAL YORK #20 THE CANADrAN
(b)

#35 (not named) #36 (not named)
(a) Afternoon #19 THE CANADrAN #38 THE ROYAL YORK
(a) Evening #2.1 CHICAGO EXPRESS #22 THE OVFRSEAS
Route Symbols: (a) via Belleville. (b) via Peterborough.
The afternoon trains, immediately preceding the spring schedule changes in
1931, were timed to perform the 333-mile run in 7 hours, 40 minutes westbound,
7 hours, 45 minutes eastbound. The consists of both trains included coaches,
dining cars, parlour cars and a buffet-lounge-observation; No. 19, in addition,
included sleeping cars through to Chicago.
In order to compete for sparse depression-era traffic with the parallel Can­
adian National (which offered identical Montreal-Toronto services at approx­
imately the same times daily), Canadian Pacific announced that. effective April
16th, 1931, a general speed-up of services would be effected. As the new C.P.R.
CANADIAN 50 R A I L
public timetables began to appear, it was seen that a full page was devoted to an
announcement of Faster Schedules -Montreal and Toronto which included a
condensed timetable giving particulars of the afternoon trains, No. 19 THE
CANADIAN westbound, and No. 38 THE ROYAL YORK eastbound. These trains
were now to be timed at 6 hours, 15 minutes in each direction, an improvement
of an hour and a half Over the former timings, as follows:
19 38
THE (Eas tern Standard Time) THE
CANADIAN ROYAL YORK
*
3.00 p.m. Lv. MONTREAL Ar. t. 9.45 p.m.
a 3.05 p.m. WESTMOUNT c 9.38 p.m.
a 3.10 p.m. MONTREAL WEST c 9.33 p.m.
*
3.30 p.m. Lv. OTTAWA Ar.

9.15 p.m.
5.00 p.m. Ar. SMITHS FALLS Lv. 7.45 p.m.
5.10 p.m. Lv.

Ar. 7.35 p.m.
d 6.56 p.m. BELLEVILLE h 5.50 p.m.
7.10 p.m. Ar. TRENTON Lv. 5.35 p.m.
7.15 p.m. Lv.

Ar. 5.30 p.m.
d 8.24 p.m. OSHAWA h 4.19 p.m.
e 8.58 p.m. LEASIDE g 3.44 p.m.
*
9.15 p.m. Ar. TORONTO Lv.
*
3.30 p.m.
FXPLANATION OF SIGNS
a Stops on signal to entrain for advertised stops, Belleville and west.
c Stops on signal to detrain from west of Smiths Falls.
d Stops on signal to detrain from Montreal or Ottawa and
entrain for Toronto or beyond.
e Stops to detrain.
g Stops to entrain for Ottawa, Montreal or beyond.
h Stops to detrain from Toronto and west, and entrain for Ottawa,
Montreal or beyond.
t. Daily.
But this was not all; over the 124.0-mile stretch between Montreal West and
Smiths Falls, No. 19 was allowed only 110 minutes. The schedule of No. 38 was
even better, requiring it to cover the same 124 miles in only 108 minutes, at an
average start-to-stop scheduled speed of 68.9 miles per hour! The new timings
thus bettered the performance of the Cheltenham Flyer by 2.6 miles per hour,
despite the fact that the route layover !l. lZ4–mile course, 46 miles longer than
the British trip; moreover, the Canadian train, comprising five to nine cars
weighed, at 475 to 650 tons, up to more than three times that of the G.W.R.
equipment. The normal Canadian Pacific motive power assignment was an
H-l-a or -b class, 2800 series, 4-6-4 locomotive.
CANADIAN 5 I R A I L
Thus, merely by bettering the mathematical facts of the Cheltenham Flyer
average start-to-stop speed, the Canadian Pacific train assumed the distinction
of being the fastest scheduled train in the world. This achievement should be
viewed against the supplementary facts of heavier trains and locomotives, less
favourable topography and longer distance which, properly speaking, were han­
dicaps in favour of the Canadian trains.
Strangely, the distinction went unchallenged by the British railway for up­
wards of 4~ months, being allowed to remain with Canadian Pacific for the whole
summer season of 1931, up to September 13th, to be precise. On the following
day, the Great Western Railway regained the title for the Cheltenham Flyer by
decreasing the Swindon-Paddington elapsed time from 70 to 67 minutes, thus
a.chieving a start-to-stop average speed of 69.2 miles per hour, .3 miles per
hour faster than THE ROYAL YORK. Later that month, on September 27th, 1931
the scheduled time for the Canadian Pacific westbound train was altered to allow
II minutes instead of 10 minutes for the 4.7-mile upgrade journey from Windsor
Station, Montreal to Montreal West; the one minute lost here over the former
schedule was subtracted from the Montreal West-Smiths Falls timing, making it
now 109 minutes, only I minute slower than the corresponding eastbound time.
Canadian Pacific trains never again attained the topmost position, but occas­
ional runs for which logs exist indicate that they retained a record for punc­
tuality and a capacity for bettering the schedule on occasion when late ~tarts
demanded, Quite a bit of commentary was published in Railway Magazine in
this period, largely due to the efforts of our member Dr. R.F. Legget, then and
now a dedicated and meticulous rail hobbyist and historian, and others. Dr.
Legget timed the westbound 109-minute No.19 on two occasions at performances
considerably better than schedule. On one occasion, engine 2812 with seven cars
having an average weight of 550 tons did the 124-mile Montreal West-Smiths
Falls run in 106 minutes, 42 seconds. Later, a run of engine 2800, with eight
cars estimated at 600 tons, travelled the same journey in 105 minutes, 50 sec-
0nds. Another recorder reported an unidentified H-I class 4-6-4 with an east­
bound train taking only 102 minutes, 52 seconds for the 124-mile journey, an
average speed of 72.2 miles per hour!
Photo RVVNicholls
CANADIAN 52 R A I L
While the 4-6-4s were the favoured engines for this duty. their place was not
infrequently taken by lighter 4-6-2s of the G-l classj there is a record of a trip
eastbound from Smiths Falls in which No. 2226 replaced an assigned 4-6-4
(which had failed). left Smiths Falls. and was several minutes late by the time
that it passed DeBeaujeu. The engineer took advantage of the favourable down­
grade thence to Vaudreuil. and arrival at Montreal West was made in a total el­
apsed time of 107 minutes. 58 seconds. two seconds less than schedule.
Though the changes of September 14. 1931 technically lost the C.P.s title to
the worlds fastest scheduled train. it nonetheless retained this distinction for
a train travelling more than 100 miles. as the Cheltenham Flyers perform­
ance was made over a route of only 77 miles. The 108-minute eastbound and
109-minute westbound timings of No.38 THE ROYAL YORK and No. 19 THE
CANADIAN respectively. however. remained in effect. winter and summer alike.
until April 2nd. 1933. when the two trains were completely obliterated as a res­
ult of the coming into effect of the pool arrangement. under the terms of the
Canadian National-Canadian Pacific Act. Their places were taken by trains 6
and 15 respectively. whose route used Canadian Pacific rails only from Windsor
Station to Dorval. following Canadian National lines thence to Toronto.
The ensuing 32-year era of the pool trains successfully stifled permanently
that competitive spirit which saw a Canadian train enshrined. albeit ever so
briefly. in the Pantheon of the worlds great expresses.
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
OBVEOU8LT~
a non-advertising publication such as CANADIAN RA IL depends
entirely upon its readership for financial support. This support
has greatly manifested itself in the past ten years. In 1956. our
subscribers nUinbered a mere few hundred and we were only cap­
able of publishing a modest collection of mimeographed sheets as
a club journal. Now with our monthly subscription numbering
well over fifteen hundred, we are able to put out a well-illustrated
20/24 page booklet that need bow to no other publication of its
type. Even with this tremendous increase in support, however,
we are still barely able to meet expenses.
A logical solution to this problem would be a further increase
in membership. This would provide us with additional revenue
enabling us to meet our expenses and possibly improve the mag­
azine in several ways. Therefore, we urge you, the members of
the Association, and our regular readers to encourage your rail
hobby friends who do not subscribe to this magazine to do so.
We particularly urge readers who have neglected to renew their
1966 subscription to do so as quickly as possible, so that they may
continue to receive CANADIAN RAIL regularly.
Your reward will be a better magazine, and the satisfaction
of knowing that you have contributed in some tangible way to the
general aims and welfare of the Association.
1) Canadian National Railways has
ordered 400, 70-ton oapaoity steel
flat ears at a oost of $5 million.
Karine Industries Limited, Sorel,
Quebeo, will build 200 of the oars
and equip the. with wrap-around
bulkheads to make them partioularly
suitable for lumber traffio. the
International Xquipment Company Ltd.
has been awarded an order for the
other 200 flat oars for general ser­
vioe with delivery slated for Karoh,
1966. They will be built at the
Companys Napanee, OntariO, plant.
!he oompleted orders will inorease CNs bulkhead-equipped flat oar
fleet to 723 and the general service flat oar fleet to 3,753.
2) Canadian National Railways has ordered 400 cylindrical type
steel hopper cars and 150 general service flat cars at a cost of
$8.5 million. Marine Industries Limited, Sorel, Quebec, will
build the 100-ton capacity hopper cars with delivery beginning
in September, 1966 at the rate of 12 cars per day. Internationa+
Equipment Company Limited, Montreal, will manufacture the 70-ton
capacity general service flatcars at their Napanee, Ontario plant
with delivery beginning in May at the rate of) cars per day.
The completed orders will increase CNs steel hopper flat car
fleet to 906 and the general service flat car fleet to ),90).
)) The Board of Transport Commissioners announced February 8,
1966 that it will not require Canadian Pacifio to operate the
Dominion this summer. The January 7 ruling permitting disoontin­
uance had reserved Judgement on this aspect. However, the Board
is requiring the railway to keep the trains equipment for possi­
ble 1967 use. Both railways will record data on passenger vol­
ume oarried and the number of requests not filled to assist the
Board with its decision which will be rendered this autumn.
4) The CN has revised its tunnel plans in the Vancouver area.
Due to unfavourable soil conditions the tunnel will be routed un­
der and around North Burnaby rather than under Kootenay Street.
Cost of the tunnel is expected to be about $10 million. The pro­
ject also calls for an *8.5 million railway bridge across Second
Narrows, expansion of the CN marshalling yards at Port Mann, and
construotion of a support yard in North Vanoouver.
5) The Canadian Government has established a 25-member oommittee
on Transport and Communications to hold publio hearings on The
adequacy of the present program and future plans for passenger
services on the lines of the Canadian Pacific Railway to meet the
effeotive demand of the public, and the effects of suoh a program
and plans.
6) The Canadian National Railways has set up Motive Power Con-
trol Bureaux at three key pOints in Canada to maintain looomotive
assIgnments in the most efficient manner.
7) Newfoundland has announced plans for a tunnel under the
Strait of Belle Isle to link Labrador with Newfoundland. The
tunnel is to be 18 feet wide, 16k miles long, and equipped to
carry cars, trains, and power cables. Construotion is estimated
to take about four years,should the plan be approved.
CANADIAN
54
R A I L
8) The CPR is rescheduling Dayliner Trains 427 and 428 running
between Sault Sainte Marie and Sudbury effective March 7, 1966.
The trains formerly connected with the Dominion, but when that
train was discontinued passengers had a 14 hour stopover for the
Canadian. Train 248 now runs 14 hours, 15 minutes later than
before, while Train 247 leaves 15 hours, 50 minutes later and
arrives 16 hours, 1 minute later than previously.
9) The City of Montreal has made this statement regarding the
conversion of CNs Mount Royal tunnel line to rapid transit:It
does not seem urgent for the time being to integrate this cir­
Cuit, but it will eventually be imperative to acquire the cir­
cuit for the best economic interests of the region.
10) Nova Scotia farmers are to obtain their rail-hauled feed
grains in the winter at the same price that applies to supplies
transported by water during the summer. This special rate ap­
plies due to inadequate storage facilities at Halifax.
11) Canadian Pacific has received 150 reefers worth $5 million
from Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited at Trenton, Nova Scotia. The
70-ton cars have a temperature range from below OaF up to 70°F.
The cars can be used to carry elther frozen goods or canned pro­
ducts that need protection from freezing. Capacity is the equiv­
alent of 80 cattle in carcass form -double that of existing
cars. They also include internal aluminum monorails of CPR de­
Sign, 8 foot wide doors, staballzed roller bearing trucks, heavy
duty aluminum floors, and are the first Canadian reefers to use
foamed-in-place insulation.
12) The CPR has purchased a special rack car for shipping boats.
The car, which is 80 feet long and 18 feet wide, was built in
the Unlted States at a cost of $25,000.
13) Canadian Paclfic has placed orders wlth Marine Industries
Limited, Sorel, Quebec, and National Steel Car Corporation ~f
Hamilton, OntariO, for 500 covered hopper cars each. This ,. $17~
milllon order will bring the CP fleet to 4,100 cars. The rail­
way has also equipped 1,500 boxcars with roof hatches for potash
movement.
14) The OntariO Government has announced plans to eliminate tax
exemptions granted to the Algoma Central Rallway. The Govern­
ment and Railway are to meet to dlscuss the sltuatlon.
1.5) The Boston and Maine Corporation has posted a notice Pro-
posed Discontlnuance of Service, effective March 7, 1966 which
would cut off passenger train servlce between White River Junc­
tion and Sprlngfleld. This would cancel Central Vermont trains
between Montreal and New York-Washington whlch must use this
trackage. Publlc hearlngs will be held.
16) In 1965, Canadian National bul1t 45 new industrial sidings
of an accumulated length of 46,925 feet, as well as 28 siding
extensions totalling 22,222 feet. Tracks were laid to three
industrial parks at Jacques Cart~er, Quevillon, and V16toria­
ville. Total length of new track for these was 15,474 feet.
CNR planners are working on a connecting line and substantlal
trackage for Sidbec, the steel complex bullding at Becancour,
Quebec.
(oontinued on page 65)
SD-40
locomotive
1.
Engine-EMD
Model 16-645E3
GMDL-SD40
2.
Main Generator and Alternator
3.
Auxi I iary Generator
4.
Control Cabinet
5.
Air Compressor
6.
Cooling
Fan
and Motor
7.
Sand
Box
8.
Batteries
9.
Inertial Air Separator
10.
Dynamic Brake
~
(?eu:i/ic
SPANNER
11. Fuel Tank
J.
(TRUCK
CENTERS) 10FT
9111
I
25
CANADIAN
S6
R A I L
(Photos listed as numbered on ensuing pages)
1-The power shortage on Canadian railways, and the resultant lease of
diesel-electric locomotives from United States railroads, has caused
sights such as this to become increasingly common: BOston & Maine
roadswitcher #1573, teamed up with a similar Canadian Pacific unit,
#6617, at St. Luc Yard, Montreal on February 8, 1966. (Ian Webb)
2-Now that the scrapping of Canadian Pacific steam power is complete,
for all practical purposes, rapid inroads are being made on the ear­
liest diesel-electric units traded in for current models. In the case
of the trade-in with Montreal Locomotive Works, the units are re­
moved from their trucks and sold to an adjacent scrap dealer. This
photograph shows Alco-GE A unit No.4004, the last of Canadian Pac­
ifics original 1949 group of cab units, going under the torch at Mon­
treal in February. (Peter Layland)
3-The low-nose profile of the freight diesel unit of the mid-1960s is pro­
vided by Canadian Pacific No. 5011, a General Motors Diesel Limited
GP-35 delivered a year ago, photographed at st. Luc Shop in Montreal
last December. (Ian Webb)
4-The painted mask expression now current on CP RDC cars is very
prominent in this excellent winter view of No. 9055, an RDC-l, trailed
by an unidentified RDC-2 still in the former colour scheme, leaving
the High Level Bridge in Edmonton for Calgary on February 23, 1965.
(Eric Johnson)
5-Comparatively few new railways were built in Canada in the years im­
mediately preceding Confederation in 1867. An exception was the Saint
Stepher: Branch Rail Road, extending from Watt, on the New Brunswick
and Canada Rail Road, to St. Stephen, a distance of 19 miLes, opened
just one hundred years ago, in 1866. Here, the roads No.2, a 4-4-0
bearing the earmarks of the Portland Companys Works, pOses for the
photographer in a classic Maritime setting which includes clapboard
houses, a wooden Gothic church, and an august clutch of stovepipe­
hatted, high-collared, Dundreary-whiskered Directors of the Company
at its namesake New Brunswick town. (Orner Lavallee Collection)
NOTE: Members are invited to submit topical or
historical photographs for inclusion in this
photo section. Pictures should be interesting
and of fairly high contrast definition for
be st reproducti on results.
1
2

I

.. O,-=K
CANADIAN NATIONAL
Purchases: March 4, 1966.
h
So far, no new locomotives have been received by the National
System. The follo~ling information pertains to those coming from
Montreal Locomotive . .Jorks.
ROAD NUJI1BER BUILDERS NUI·iEER BUILDERS MODEL HAlLWAY CLASS
3202 to 3205
3206 to 3221 11-3443-01
to M-3443-04
M-3444-01
to M-3444-16
DL-640-A DL-640-A MR-24b MR-24b
Scrappings: March 4, 1966.
#28 Builder: General Electric
Built: April, 1950
Horsepower: 600
Maximum Speed: 55 mph
Builders Number: 30608
Builders Class: 70-ton
Railway Class: ER-6a
Assignment: Atlantic Region
On February 27, 1965, number 28 was damaged in an accident at
mile post 54.3 of the Souris Subdivision. It was retired the fol­
lowing April. Originally, it carried the road number 7802, chang­
ed in 1954 to 1528. Its final number was assigned in 1956.
#1631 Builder: CLC
Built: August, 1955
Horsepower: 1200
Maximum Speed: 60 mph
Builders Number: 2881
Builders Class: H12-44
Hailway Class: CR-12e
Assignment: Atlantic Region
Extensive fire damage occurred to this roadswitcher in March,
1965 and it was consequently retired the following October.
Rebuildings: Harch 4, 1966.
The following locomotives are to be rebuilt into DL-640-As
by ~ontreal Locomotive Works. However, they are not to emerge as
any specific 3200 series locomotive.
ROAD BUILDERS DATE BUILT BUILDER BUILDERS RAIUJAY
NU~1BER NUIiBER I~ODEL CLASS
3060 81177 July, 1955
~lLW RS-10 MR-16g
3079 81586 November, 1956
MLW RS-10 MR··16k
3087 8159
4 December,
1956 MLW RS-10 MR-16k
3807 81212 October, 1955
MLW RS-10 r·:B-16f
/13807 was originally numbered 1870, changed in 1956 to. 3050.
The present number was applied in 1957.
In addition, number 8464 was retired January 17, 1966 to be
converted to 8-13 at Point St. Charles Shop. The booster will be
assigned to !innipegs Symington Yard.
8464
77285 January, 1953 ~1L1 s-660 11S7b
CANADIAN 6.2 R A I L
Sales: Mnrch 4, 1966.
ROAD El:IL0ERS DATE BUILT BUILDER BUILDERS RAILliJlY
NUMBER ;~UIiBER
MODEL CLASS
a 2 73350 May, 1947 GE B-B-88/88-4GE-733 ER-4a b 8457 77764
February, 1952 MLW s-660 11S-7a
c 8485 MLW s-660
11S-7c
a) Retired from the Atlantic Region and sold to Bowaters Nersey
Paper COlnpany, Liverpool, N.S., on April 22, 1965. This road­
switcher was originally numbered 7752. It was changed in 1951 to
7551, in 1954 to 1501, and to its present number in 1956.
b) Retired from the Great Lakes Region and sold to International
Minerals and Chemical Corporation (Canada) Limited, Gerald,
Saskatchewan.
c) On r;8Y 31, 1965, thi s switcher was sold to Fraser
Limited, Edmunston, N.B.
Miscellaneous: December 31, 1965.
Companies
1) The following locomotives are having their maximum
changed from 65 mph to 75 mph.
speed
BOAD NUMBERS RAILWAY CLASS ROAD NUMBEBS RAE..WAY GLASS
3061 to J065 ~lR-16h 9438 to 9452 3671
to :700 11R-18c even numbers MFA-16c 3815
to 822 MR-16j 9456 MFA-16c
The ?Y)gram was
started the previous year with the locomotives
shown bel,)ll, and is not yet complete.
:3615 to n70 MR-18b 9409 to 9427 3701
to :724 MR-18d odd numbers MFB-16a J726 to ;745 ME-18d 9428
to 9436 3850
to :3-388 ME-18g even numbers llFA-16b 3890
to
:3893 MR-18g 9429 to 9437 9400 to 9407 MFA-15a odd
numbers MFB-16b 9408 to 9426
even numbers MFA-16a
2)
Loc
omotive assignment changes for the year 1965 are below:
ROAD NUIiBERS RAILWAY CLASS OLD ASSIGNMENT NEW ASSIGNMENT
3609 to 3614 MR-l8a DWl CV
4552 to 4557 GE-17J CV GTW
7900 GS-IOa CN GTW
7902 GS-IOa CN DWP
79<;5 GS-IOa CN GTW
3 ) Class MFA-15a locomotives, road numbers 9400 to 9407, have had
their continuous tractive effort changed from 42,000 pounds to
46, 000 pound s •
4) The
idling axle of each truck of the 1700 series locomotives,
classes I~R-I0a to MR-I0d, is being removed. The modification and
its side effects are shown in diagrams in Number 176. At this
date, t;le following locomotives have been modified:

r
.I
CANADIAN 63 R A I L
Class MR-I0b: 1706, 1708 to 1710.
.. VR-I0o: 1716, 1717, 1719, 1721, 1723, 1729.
Rentals: September I, 1965
Canadian National is operating Ontario Northland loooaotives
on a pool agreement; they are not leased.
Rentals: Maroh 4, 1966
Starting Maroh 1, 1966, the DMI units are being returned. They
will prooeed from Montreal to Ottawa, thence to Winnipeg via
Capreol, and from there baok to Proctor, Minn.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Purchases and Rebuildings: Maroh 18, 1966
1 ) The la st DL-640-A 8 from Montreal Looomotive Works have be en
delivered.
ROAD BUI LDER S UNIT DATE BUI LDER , S
NUMBER NUMBER DATE DELIVERED REPLACED BUILT NUMBER
4244 M-3436-l2 February :3 , 1966 4415 1950 77336
4245 M-3436-l3 February 10, 1966 4412 1950 77333
4246 M-3436-l4 February 16, 1966 4414 1950 77335
4247 M-3436-15 February 23, 1966 4004* 1949 76856
4248 M-3436-l6 February 25, 1966 4022 1950 77317
4249 M-3436-17 Maroh 7, 1966 4014 1950 77309
4250 M-3436-18 March 11, 1966 4046 1951 77716
:t All units replaced were built by Montreal Locomotive Works ex­
oept those marked by an aaterisk, whioh were manufaotured by the
American Locomotive Company.
2) The last two GP-35s from General Motora Diesel Limited ar-
rived a s shown be low.
5024
5025 A-2123
A-2124
Jan ua r y , 19 66
Jan ua ry, 1966 1401 2906
1953
1954
A-521
!-606
3) Angus Shops ha s al so en tered the rebui lding busi ne s s. The
parts from #-8557 Which had been severely damaged by fire in 1965,
were taken and reassembled into an A unit. The frame used was
that of 4014, whose usable parts were employed on 4249. The unit
resulting is numbered 4016, not to be confused with the 4016 that
WBe rebuilt into 8824. Further data is below.
ROAD NUMBER
8557
40 16 (f ire t )
4016 (second)
8824
BUI LDER S NUM HER
81483
77311
77311
RAI LWAY CLASS DATE BUILT BUILDER
DRS-IGe
DFA-15b
DRS-16k
1956
1950
1966
1957
MI»I
MLW
Angus
MLW
Sales: Karoh 18, 1966
NO.972, the last D-IO owned by C~was sold to Kr. G.M. Hart of
York, Pennsylvania. The locomotive left Winnipeg in mid-January,
1966 and was expeoted to take about a month to arrive at its
destination.
Renumberings: March 11, 1966
FIRST
NUll HER
4039
4040
4041
4061
4062
4063
4066
4067
4068
4069
4070
4071
4072
4073
4074
4075
4435
4437 4438
4439
4440
4441
4442
4443
4444
4445
FIRST
CLASS
DFA-15d
DFA-15d
DFA-15d
DFA-15e
DFA-15e
DFA-15e
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DFA-15f DFA-15f
DFA-15f
DPB-150
DPB-150
DFB-15d
DFB-15d
DPB-15d
DFB-15d
DPB-15d
DFB-15d
DFB-15d
DFB-15d
SECOND
NUMBER
1434
1433
1432
1419
1420
1421
1422
1423
1424
1425
1426
1427
1428
1429
1430,
1431
1909
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1915
1919
SECOND
CLASS
DPA-15d
DPA-15d
DPA-15d
DPA-15b
DPA-15b
DPA-15b
DPA-150 DPA-150
DPA-150
DPA-150
DPA-150
DPA-150
DPA-15c
DPA-15c
DPA-150
DPJ.-150
DPB-15a
DPB-15a
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15b
DPB-15d
Rentals: February 17, 1966
DATE SECOND
NUlIBER
APPLIED
12/4/55
7/4155
9/1/55
22/1/55
6/1/65
ls/12/54
20/10/64
23/11/54
16/ll/64
2S/10/54
29/12/54
5/11/54
ls/l0/54
18/12/54
4/12/64
3/1/56
14112/54
19/12/54
lS/11/64
21/11/54
18/10/54
7/1/55
12/1/55
4/1/55
21110/54
27/10/54
DATE RETURNED
TO FIRST
NUlIBER AND CLASS
9/5/60
10/5/60
11/1/66
26/1/66
28/1/66
13/1/66
21/1/66
24/9/65
30/9/65
11111/65
25/1/66
1012/66
11/1/66
1/10/65
29/12/65
22/1/66
10/2/66
20/1/66
13/10/65
7/10/65
25/10/65
1/10/65
15/10/65
lS/10/65
1111/65
3/11/65
Two more Boston & Maine Corporation roadswitchers have been
leased, numbers 1557 and 1558. They are eaoh 1500 horsepower and
were built by GKKYD between 1950 and 1953.
Misoel1aneous: Karoh 18, 1966
The follow ing is a list of the remaining steam 10oomoti ve s
owned by the CPR. All are held for speoifio, although in some
oases indefinite, parties.
ROAD CLASS WHEEL BUILDER DATE BUILDERS STORAGE
NUMBER ARRANGEMENT BUILT NUMBER LOCATION
424 D-4-g 4-6-0 CPR 1912 None Angus 1201
G-5-a 4-6-2 CPR 1944 None Angus 2314
G-3-g 4-6-2 MLW 1923 64538 Weston 2827
H-1-c 4-6-4 l1LW
1937 68973 Angus 2858 H-1-d
4-6-4 NLW 1938 69108 Angus 3100
K-1-a 4-8-4 CPR 1928 None Weston 3611 N-2-a
2-8-0 MLW 1911 .50238 Weston 3716 N-2-b
2-8-0 MLW 1912 51628 Weston
690.5 V-3-c 0-8-0 CPR 1913 None Weston
CANADIAN 65 R A I L
OBSERVATIONS (continued)
17) The Pullman Company will build the passenger cars for the
experimental high speed trains purchased from United Aircraft
Corporation by the United States Government. The cars, to be
built at Pullman Standards South Side car works in Chicago,
will include such features as a self-banking system, reclin1ng
seats, and V1stadomes. Capacity of the cars, which are 5 feet
w1der than the usual railway car, is 156 persons.
PYCCKA~ BArOH
Critics of the standards and amenities of the North American
railway passenger train (where such exist!) should sample the offer­
ings of some of the eastern European systems. In the U.S.S.R., for
example, it is reported that certain rural lines of the state-owned rail­
ways still carry passengers in candle-lit, stove-heated cars such as
this. a former Tsarist-era, fourth-class, coach/sleeping car.
(Drawing by Philip Mason)

AUTUMN TRIP
• • • • • • • • • • • •
…. 0 ……… The grapevine tells us that this years autumn
excursion will be a repeat of last years very enjoyable two­
day outing, from Montreal to Portland. Maine and return. It
is tentatively scheduled for the first weekend in October; one
thing that is not tentative but is most definite is that Canadian
Nationals superb 4-8-4, No.6218, will be at the head of the
train. Watch for an early announcement!!
G-5s in PENNSYLVANIA
Those who yearn for the sight of a Canadian Pacific stearn locomotive in action
may satisfy it easily this corning summer –provided that they live within easy
travelling distance of York, Pennsylvania. These photographs show G-5 4-6-2
No. 1286 in the rolling hills of the Keystone Commonwealth, where she will be
running under the auspices of Rail Tours, Incorporated between May and October
of 1966. Rail Tours is headed by our member George M. Hart whose commend­
able creed, evident in these photographs, is to keep No. 1286 and a sister in as
close to prototype appearance as possible. The upper photograph was taken on
August 14th, 1965 at McKnightstown, Pa., on the first run over the Western
Maryland Railway. The lower picture, made on April 10th of last year, shows
the corresponding initial run on the Maryland & Pennsylvania system. Both runs
were made out of York, the seat of operations of Rail Tours. Incorporated.
CANADIAN
67
R A I L
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Note·: figures on map represent street numbers nearest Hltlonl
The eight-mile Bloor-Danforth rapid
tranSit route of the Toronto Transit
Commission -was opened to the public
at 6:00 AM on Saturday, February 26.
An offioial oeremony oompleting the
$200 million projeot, which includes
the University subway, opened on
February 28, 1963, had been held on
the previous day, at which the Prime
Minister of Canada,Hon. L.B.Pearson,
and the Premier of Ontarlo,Hon. John
Robarts, offioiated. Completion of
this east-west link gives the Queen
City 15 miles of rauid transit line.
A further $77 million is being ex­
pended on two extensions to the new
line, which will carry it 3.5 miles
west to Islington, and 2.8 miles
east to Warden, giving a final length
for the Bloor-Danforth line of over
14 miles, on final oompletion at the
end of 1967.
(see next page)
CANADIAN 68 R A I L
1.I.R. No. 500 PRESERVED
Canadian National Railways announced recently that one of Canadas original
diesel-electric locomotives. Thousand Islands Railway No.500. would be donated
to the city of Gananoque. Ontario. in a ceremony to be held this summer. No.
500. presently in storage at Brockville. was constructed in 1930 by equipping a
conventional steeple-cab electric locomotive of the Oshawa Railway with a die­
sel-electric motor-generator. Both the Oshawa and Thousand Islands lines were
subsidiaries of Canadian National Railways.
For three decades. No. 500 plied between Gananoque. on the Saint Lawrence
River. and Gananoque Junction. six miles inland. on the CN Montreal-Toronto
main line. pulling an ancient wooden open-platform baggage-passenger car. No.
100. which was retired and scrapped some years before the locomotive ceased
service. Like the Toonerville Trolley of cornie strip fame. the Gananoque
shuttle met all the trains on the CN main line. Between-times. No. 500 occup­
ied itself with freight transfers over the short line.
No. 500 became a part of Gananoque and the residents bestowed nicknames
on the improbable-looking little locomotive. such as Susan Push and The
Black Panther. The line boasted two intermediate stations; one. pretentiously
named Main Street. was a short section of umbrella shelter where the line
crossed Highway 2 in the middle of the town. The other station was at Gananoque
Cemetery. The railway was promoted in the Eighties by the Rathbun family of
Deseronto. Ont •• and once had ambitions to extend to northern Ontario. It was
opened between the town and ol,d Gananoque Junction in 1884. but was extended in
length when the position of the Junction. on the Grand Trunk (now CN) main line
was changed to a level gradient position from the bottom of a sag.
The TIR ceased corporate existence in 1958 and is now operated as a spur.
No. 500 was reti red in 1961.
PHOTOGRAPHS
(opposite page)
(Top) Thousand Islands Railway No.500 in service
at Gananoque in the summer of 1949 (OSAt).
(Bottom) Out of the past comes this photograph
of H.R.lIcMillan Export Co. Logging engine
#1055 on the now-defunct Chemainus rail
operation on Vancouver Island.
TTC BLOOR SUBWAY OPENS (continued)
One hundred ~nd sixty-four new cars
by Hawker-Siddeley Canada Limited at
for the line were constructed
Fort William, Onto
Operation of the system according to the new routes shown in the
diagram will continue for a trial period of 6 months, after whioh
the Yonge-University route will revert to operation as a separate
line from an individual Bloor-Danforth route, rendering it necess­
ary for passengers to transfer from one line to the other. At a
leter date, the two types of routing will be evaluated in the light
of traffio and passenger flows and requirements.

CANADIAN
70
R A I L
MONGREL DOGGEREL ~
POETRY is never very far from the heart of the Irish, be it sentimental,
patriotic, allegorical or comical. The example which we quote below was com­
posed by a hardy son of old Erin named Mulligan who, with an associate nam­
ed Meldrum, practiced law in the city of Sudbury in the first decade of the Twen­
tieth Century. The subject of this contribution to Canadian railway literature
was a dog, shipped from Cartier to Sudbury over the Canadian Pacific Railway.
When the animal failed to turn up at its destination, the owner approached Mr.
Mulligan with a view to legal action, and the lawyers letter to Mr. F.P.Gutelius,
then General Superintendent for the C.P.R.s Lake Superior Division at North
Bay, went as follows:
Dear Sir,
On the twenty-fifth of November in the year 1909,
A dog of mixed breeding, but with pedigree fine
Was shipped to this town oer your excellent road,
In changing from Cartier, his former abode.
Anthine Lalonde was the name of the owner. For the dog
We find his name is not down in our log;
But 909 was marked on the ticket,
Which the owner received from the C.P.R. wicket.
Of the numberless dogs which, in twenty-odd years
Your road has transported, it plainly appears
From the feeling instructions which our client has given
(And his tone plainly told of a kindly heart riven),
No such valuable dog has been in your care
As the canine that seems to have vanished in air.
For vanished he has before delivery was made,
As completely as the murderer of Ethel Kinraid.
Our duty and pleasure it is now to enforce
A reasonable recompense as a matter of course.
No extravagant damages, no penal demands
Need your Company fear at our legal hands,
But such moderate and modest and minimum sum
As will make you suspect the millenium has come.
Dont smile at the adjectives ascribed to the price
We can show them deserved in less than a trice.
A faithful description we will now present,
In the hope that to settle you will be content.
His breeding was mixed, but the ensemble was sound,
Part spaniel, part collie, part huskie, part hound
And to every fine breed that to blood could give grace,
In this composite creation has had a slight place.
In form he was portly, his appetite mild.
His hair was silky, like that of a child.
He could run. he could sleep. he could eat. he could bark.
As well as the dog that last entered the Ark.
As fleet as a deer. as cute as a fox.
As keen as a wolf. as strong as an ox,
A more wonderful dog than Dame Hubbards delight,
He played through the day, and he slept through the night.
And one of the charms of this wonderful dog
Was that he modestly kept his greatness incog •
Now for extrinsic value. mental anguish and grief,
We make no demand, but we do seek relief
For the contractual value, the intrinsic worth
Of this choice canine hero, the finest on earth.
On earth, 0 sad Fate, if it had to be said
That while the poet lived the poor dog was dead:
Now twenty-five dollars is the amount we demand,
Do you feel a mailed fist behind the gloved hand?
If you settle, we smile. Refuse and we fight.
The Division Court here will settle it right.
We will summon a jury of tried men and true.
In the case of the dog, they will know what to do.
We will choose those just men who have lost their fine kine
In parading the track of the C.P.R. line.
Now answer us quick. Will you fight? Will you settle?
This doggerel rhyme inspires our mettle.
U you pay without suit the full twenty-five
The dog will be yours if he turns up alive.
But if we must sue, and we beat you in Court,
We will refer to the dog hereafter as Sport.
Your obedient servants,
MULLIGAN & MELDRUM.
Attorneys.
Tradition has it that the dog was subsequently located, and returned to his
owner. It is also said that Mr. Gutelius replied to Mr. Mulligan in a similar,
poetic vein, but this has not come to light, to our knowledge.
APRIL 28
TH
:w~
1966 MUSEUM SCHEDULF,
TO
OCTOBER 27TH
From May 15th to end of August:
MOIfTR£AL
CANADA
Sunday to Friday. 10 AM to 4 :30 PM
*
~~~~
Eastern Daylight Time.
DU 28 AVRIL
PLEASE NOTE: The Museum will
AU
not be open for visitors on Saturdays.
27 OCTOBRE
expo67
CANADlAN RAILWA Y MUSEUM (Delson)
MOtrrRtAL
CANADA
Rue Saint-Pierre. St.Constant, Que.
Fallout
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
If our husbands had to put up with this in the middle of THEIR coffee break something would be done
about it fast enough!
CANADIAN RAIL: Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Committee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Subscription includes Associate Membership: $ 4.00 annually.
PUBLICA TIONS COMMITTFF.: D.R. Henderson, Chairman.
J .A. Collins,
W. L. Pharoah.
ACTING EDITOR, CANADIAN RAIL: Ome r Lavallee
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
Derek Boles
Murray Dean
Peter Layland
James Sandilands
Ian Webb
ASSOCIA TF. FDITORS:
EDITORIAL STAFF:
DISTRIBUTION:
MEMBERSHIP SF.CRFTAR Y:
Copyright 1966
John W. Saunders
William Fowle
Michael Leduc
Printed in Canada on
Canadian paper

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