Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 172 1965

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 172 1965


n.a la
Number 172 / Deoember 1965
FACT
OR ?

Page 206
Cana dian Rai 1
FACT OR FtlllClY
?

Rock Islands AEROTRADTS
are being leased to the CNR for •••••
new, nonstop service from Montreal-Downtown and
Montreal-Dorval
Airport to Toronto on 5i hour schedules.
One set will be on a
nonstop Montreal-Ottawa
service also. This interesting
extract
is from the December 1965 issue of The Railroad Capital the
monthly newsletter
of The Railroad Club of Chicago, Inc. We re­
publish the unconfirmed,
yet undenied,
report along with an ar­
ticle from the C. R. H. A. News Report #80, dealing with the test
runs of the original AEROTRADT
on the National System in July,
1957.
Due to a reorganization
of the CRRA Publications
Committee,
the feature article, edited by Mr. W.
Pharoah and intended for this issue of Canadian
Rail, has been postponed until January, 1966.
*****************************
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETDTG
The Annual General Meeting of the Association
will be held Wednes­
day, January 19, 1966, at 8:15 p.m. in the McConnell Engineering
Building, McGill University,
Montreal.
February 9:
March 9:
FORTHCOMDTG
MEETINGS
Mr. Carrington
Eddy, President,
Pinconning
& Blind
River HR. will give an illustrated
talk on the pro­
blems and the pleasures Of operating a private rye
Annual Dinner of the Association,
to celebrate
the
C.R.R.A. s thirty-fourth
anniversary.
OI!rAWA ADDRESS
From Ottawa, we have received notice that the address
of the Ottawa Branch, C.R.R.A. is being established
as
P. O. Box 352,
Terminal A
Ottawa, 2,
Ontario.
Canadian Rail
We ride the
AB_eIPBAltlV
Page 207
Horses and cattle grazing alongside
the Canadian Nationals
St.Hyacinthe
Subdivision
did not bolt with fright on Thursday morn­
ing, July 18th –for they had all seen trains before. The farmers
however, did pause to look up from their fields, and autoists and
children did stop to gaze as General Motors AEROTRAIN No.1000 sped
by on one of its first public appearances
in the country.
Brought to Canada through the cooperation
of the Canadian Nat­
ional Railways and the General Motors Corporation,the
modern light­
weight train was demonstrated
for newsmen, railway officials,
and
other interested
parties, including representatives
of the Canadian
Railroad Historical
Association.
On Wednesday,July
17th, the train
was at Toronto, the next day at Montreal,
with ~uebec and Ottawa
getting their views of the streamliner
on the following two days.
Details of the revolutionary
ten-car train, and its specially
designed 1200 horsepower diesel-electric
locomotive
are well known, and
can only be summarized
briefly here. Planned and constructed
by
General Motors as a possible solution to the so-called
passenger
train problem,
the entire train is operated as a unit. Two-axle
coach bodies follow the basic design of a G.M. autobus —for, in
fact, many of the components
are off-the-shelf items from General
Motors autobus stores.
Forty-passenger
coach bodies of aluminum
construction
were increased
18 in width to provide more seating
comfort and the usual chauffeurs
area transformed
to lavatory and
galley space. More or less standard railway-type
vestibules
were added
at each end, and the whole mounted on a
steel underframe,
ca­
pable of withstanding
800,000 pounds of buff, the maximum required
of conventional
rolling stock.
The interior fittings and the decor of the train are also far
from conventional
and a number
of features have been incorporated
which are not found in most standard railway passenger coaches. The
reclining seats of the AERO TRAIN are comfortable
but do not reverse
requiring the turning of the complete train at terminal pOints. On
certain runs into dead-end stations,
this could be somewhat
of a
disadvantage. Seats are a mere detail, however, and could be pro­
vided in more suitable models. A more serious fault of the train,
to my mind, is the type of doors between the cars. To open these
doors, they must be pushed and punched with no little force –some
thing akin to the tumble-out
centre doors on the General Motors
demonstrator bus used last year by the Montreal Transportation
Com­
mission.
General Motors just dont seem to know how to build a
doorl
The demonstration
run from Montreal to St.Hyacinthe
on Thursday
July 18th, commenced at exactly 7:05 AM as G.M. #1000 eased its red
and silver train out of the National Systems Montreal Central Sta­
tion. Eight minutes later, the AEROTRAIN pulled into Bridge Street
for a It minute halt. No speed records ~e being attempted on this
trip, and it took another eleven minutes before St.Lambert
Station
was passed, while an additional
unexplained
halt in Southwark
Yard
dropped our passing time at St. Hubert to 7: 32 AM. The rest of the
run to St. Hyacinthe showed that the train was capable of speedsup
to 72 m.p.h.
Page 208
Canadian Rail
After arrival at St. Hyacinthe,
the train was on
the wye–then made ready for the return trip.
per hour speeds were achieved on the return, with
backed and
turned
Seventy-five
mile
details of the nn
as follows:
Mile 00.0
7.5 25.6 27.7
Leave
Pass
St.Hyacinthe
St.Madeleine
St.Hubert
St.Lambert
Charlevoix
Street,
Montreal
8:41
8:49:30
9:06 9:11
9:20
AM
From this latter point in the Montreal Terminals,
we backed slowly
into Central Station and the train made ready for the visit of the
public.
All in all, the cars rode well at the speeds attained –much
better than I had anticipated
–and only at the rear of the last
unit was there any uncomfortable
side motion. NOise, however, was
high at the ends of every car, but it is my opinion that this noise
is allowed to enter the body by means of the poorly-fitting,
rub­
ber-edged doors referred to previously.
Replacement
of these, by
tight-closing
and more reasonably-manipulated
doors would,r-believe
solve much of the noise problem. Also, imagine the snow problem in
the winter with doors that dont close tightly.
Other comments over-heard
on the trip ••• ~O coat hooks •• My,
what a tiny seat in the lav~ ••• etc, can be discounted
in a resume on
this interesting
train, for such details ought to be modified in
a production
model. Likewise, the rather insignificant
marker la­
mps provided for operational
purposes should be replaced by standaxd
Canadian Rail
Page 209
electric markers.
Whether or not the AERO TRA IN , as built by General Motors, will
become a model
for the trF.lins of the day after Tomorrow is not for
us to say at this point. Certainly no one will claim that it is ~
last word in passenger travel, but it does provide a real operating
train in which new ideas have not been shunned. Destiny could hand
the AERO TRAIN of 1957 the crown that was the ZEPHYRs in 1935,or it
could become forgotten along with the steam-coach
and the Auto-Rail­
er. Whatever its future, it is heartening
to see that the railways and
their suppliers are still experimenting
and designing new pro­
ducts that will keep rail transport
in the foreground
of the
countrys transportation
picture.
On Saturday, July 19th, 1957, a group of members of
the Association
rode the AEROTRAIN from Montreal to
Ottawa. For the benefit of those who collect logs
and statistics,
we reproduce an unofficial
log of
this trip taken by Douglas Brown,
our Corresponding
Secretary,
with a few timed miles.
Log of AEROTRAIN trip, Montreal to Ottawa,
July 19th, 1957 –Canadian National Rys.
Montreal (Central Station) Leave
7:31:30 AM
Turcot East
Pass
7:43:30
Turcot West
7:48:30
Lachine
7:53
Dorval
7:55:15
Pointe Claire
7:59:30
Ste.Anne de Bellevue
8:04
Vaudreuil
8:07:15
Coteau
Arr. 8:19:30
Leave
8:23:30
DeBeaujeu
Pass 8:31:15
Ste.Justine
8:35:4
5
Glen Robertson
8:39:15
Alexandria
Arr. 8:45:45
Leave 8:49:15
Greenfield
Pass
8:56:30
Maxville
9:00:30
Moose Creek
9:05:30
Casselman
9:10:45
Vars
9:20:30
Carlsbad Springs
9:25
Old N.Y.C. Diamond
9:29:30
Rurdman
9:33
Ottawa
Arr.
9:37
Timed miles: Cornwall Sub. Mile
Alexandria
Mile
13-14
16-17
93-94
95-96 55
sec.(65.5 mph)
44 sec.(81.8 mph)
53 sec.(67.9 mph)
45 sec.(80.0 mph)
45 sec.(80.0 mph)
Sub.
107-108
000000000000000
C
~l~~S· DAlE e.UILDEI. e.UILDEJ,·S
I>UILT OllDE N°
ClNlD~N NllIONll ~~lVAYS
Q·s· a. 1947 6 E ·C~ 4 TO~ DlcSEL·EU:C lOCOCLA.SS 5.~·SB/l>tH·GE=-7.:.:3c.:3-+_-,7-,1c..::5:..:.1-,-4-_1:..:.1:..::5:..:2=–_–I
MECHIIIIICIL OEPiI,TMENT
NO~TJ,EiL
5Ef~.!:.N°· 2S~:)(7751) 2.~?~~l7752) TYPE DIESEl:ElEC
~_~ __ L-__ ~ ___ L-___________________________ ~ ________________ J-__ ~_
IOD~
5\iITCH. Q·B
HAULA.GE flATING IY;
o
I ___ . __ CC;.,o..: ___ ,.
i_-,: Ao..,.· __ -.. _______ JO. ._. _____ __ ~ …. ~ __ –.L·_,_,·4,,·,_· __
~,.~—————.-~~.~ .. ———-I——__JJ
TIICTIVE EFFOP.T·. ·irADLIGHn, ., GEif<. RAllO·
2,400 L~ WITH .30~ iOHE510N 2 PYLE IIIT. TYPE C·2O· G.N ; il·25 1 DOUOLE EDUCTION
1~.oooLa. (01111. e ( MPH , OJP;51P.(LA5SL,6.MP5-00U!lLEN~LAMP ,THJOTTLE COllll110L ELEc.rllO·PI!EUMATIc.
VEIGHT WITH RJ~t-lItJ(,5UPPLIE5 gMOOL~:Dle5EL EIIJGINES . 11 MK e I OPERI-ING HECHA.IIJISM
llC,HT 85.350 -i 2-DI1.000 CA1Ef1.PILlAP. V·!.60· l MV z.!>C4-M …. c;,.JET V … LVES,MlJLTIPLE UNIT.
JOURI.JA.LS 5··IFIlICTION . 4-CYCLE 94-~! CAe. HE …. ,E· KY50l,·MODfl.VCF.1> N·.C·~4U.
WHeELS ~.!>ROllED STEEL 1-0 HP. EiCH ~5c HP TOTiL: 1000 ,P·H· 5TOR … c;,f; ~TTEY • ElC.IOE ·32. -Ell>
fUEL CAP~ITY 250 6iL~ IOLltJG· 350 R-P.M. I TYPE· KT-~:)A.
5PEW MiX· ~5 H·P·H· EIIJEF.ATCRS: &ELL P.INGEII. 550001 CAl> fTC ..
111 I>P…KE5 :AUTO.II SlAm.MULTIPLE U~IT. 2. WESTI~GHOU5E-5 GT 555 -AI KEI5TOtJE INTEllIoJAL QUICK .. CilNe;,. • DODO Z TF.lJCKS
.sCH~DULE ~YM5nN6HOUSE —14-EL. EXcITE, iUX· GEtJ·2·5G·.C; 140 I HOP,t-J. I· ,,-, PNEUPHOt-JIC. w.,·~ VEIC,HTS OF Pi>.f<.iS (APP~OX ss;OoQ1 IOTAl.
r.1I.K~ ::Yl·4·~8-1YP~BDI.bP,i>.KI: 11 (OMPIIE5S0ll. . MJD 50X CAP,&,CI1Y 000 L~ CHUIIDEIFAME COMPLETr YITHAll EQUIPMEtJT.
~SEP.VOltr,5 2-lOr. . 2 GADIoJEjl,· DEIIlVEfI MODEL ~D5-~OO3 . S … t.JDES. MGt.JET TYPE· 11 MV ,2 A 0 EI!6~ .• (TAI.!KS EMPT …. )>> 55.000.
LUe>. elL Il.Z51A6E AIP,COOL~D.e.ElIDP,~E;ioJ·V-TE Hf:IIEp,· PUIITl.tJ MODEL·N°.4-0G· ENGIIIE HOOD VITH DOOP,S ______ 2000
1
;iNK CAPiOllSY5TEM IEoJ(,. S06~ LU~.OIL FllTER-MM;fJET ENGlilJE·GEt.JEIIAiOR SETCOHPLETC_IOSOd
TOTA.L OIL SYSTEH C..PY ~oo • N°. 12.00 . SitE 4L. DIESEL ENGINE (DR.Y) __________ ·.P)oof
~ATEII COOLING SYSTEM. VINOOV WIPEf,S CA SPRAGUE DEVICES GEt-IERATOP, 11TH COUPLI~64 PULLEY _3.100·
TNK CAP SY5TEH Cl-pY. I Et.JC, 40C,,s TUCK COHPI.E1E VfTH TWO MOTORS LS.OOOI
TOTiL COOW,J6 SYSTEM ClpY Bo TRiCTlON MOTOI. COMPLtiE VI1H GEM U~1i ·<.5001
rCTI::s~~:~~~.J •. 1~ _____ -L ________________ .L..TI\_r>._C_il_O_IIJ_MO_TO_P,…:-::::-::.-:..:-C!-::.:!..:.-!..:-:..:-:…:-,,-=..-.::.—=-..:. . .::.-o..:..I;:.:.I0~0i~.(~:–…J
_ .. • 6EAA UlIliL _____ . _.1400
JUtoJc ~4-1
Canadian Rail
Page 211
Dlagraml
Canadian National #2, class ER-4a, has been sold to Bowaters
Mersey Paper Company Limited at Liverpool,
N.S. This General
Electric built unit, bearing number 7752 –
class Y-l-a, was
purchased new by the C.N. in 1947 for service on the Murray
Harbour line in Prince Edward Island. The weight-restricting
bridge on the line was subsequently
abandoned and
the 380 hp.
unit transferred
to other duties in the Maritime Provinces.
In January 1951, its number was changed
to 7551, while the
general re-classification
of September,
1954 assigned to the
unit the designation
-class ER-4a, number
1501. It received
its final CN number, 2, in June 1956.
an
From Mr. Conrad
C. Steeves of Hillsboro,
N.B., we learn
that the two Maritimes scenes on Page 148 of the Sept.
issue, were taken near Halifax, N.S. Mr.Steeves
writes
The upper photo shows the Sackville River bridge at mi.
10.7 on the Bedford Sub of the CN Atlantic Region. By
1914 a three-span
bridge carrying two tracks was at this
location.
The lower photo is in the same vicinity, at
mile 11.0. A modern concrete structure was erected in
1952. Locomotive #154 was
rebuilt at the lCR shops in
Moncton in 1894 and the picture appears to have been
taken after that date.
From
an old
postcard,
showing the
original Second
Narrows Bridge near
Vancouver, B.C.
This
bridge
subject of
article in the
Oct.) 196.5 issue
to be replaced by
Canadian National.
Canadian Rail
Page 213
lay of (t)utntt I{atlmay
M. D. Leduc.
The small community of Deseronto on the Bay of Quinte, Ont.,
caught the railway fever during the latter half of the 1800s.
This railway fever had become contagious
throughout
the continent,
especially
in the area which is now known as Eastern Canada. Des­
eronto had been established
by the Rathbun family, who had settled
in North America some two hundred years earlier.
The Rathbuns
were a very ambitious family, and this was very evident in Edward
Wilkes Rathbun, the first son of the family to be born in Canada.
Edward Rathbun, whose prime interests lay in the lumber and
charcoal industries,
sharply turned his attention to the railway
industry when iron ore was reported found in the Counties of Ad­
dington, Hastings and Lennox, north of Deseronto.
Smelting meant
business for his charcoal plant, and the railway would be, by far,
the best means for tranporting
both the charcoal and the iron.
Rathbun, relying on his political associate Alexander Campbell,
incorporated
the Napanee, Tamworth and Quebec
Railway Company on
May 15, 1878. This railway was to be constructed
from the Bay of
Quinte to the Ottawa Valley. Rathbuns reliance on Campbell, how­
ever, proved fruitless,
and during the following two years the
railway did not receive any government
help. Rathbun started,
using his own finances, but did not get very far.
The first section of the line, from Napanee
to Tamworth, a
distance of twenty-eight
miles, resulted in a large finandal loss­
with a fleeing contractor
and workers to be paid. Rathbun paid
the expenses himself and in 1883 received a municipal subsidy from
the Town of Napanee.
The line was finally opened for traffic on August
4, 1884. During the same period, Rathbun established
the Bay of Quinte Railway and Navigation Company, in order to con­
nect the Town of Deseronto with the Grand Trunk main line. The
Bay of Quinte line ran from Deseronto to Napanee, a distance of
some four miles, and on July 1881 was completed and opened for
traffic.
Thus, Rathbun had two operating railways travelling
a dis­
tance of thirty-two
miles from Deseronto to Tamworth.
But, being
ambitious,
he borrowed two hundred thousand dollars and extended
his lines from Tamworth to Marlbank where there was an iron field
which meant more
traffic.
He received another subsidy and ex-
tended to Tweed. The
line from Tamworth
to Tweed was about
eighteen miles in length and was opened
for traffic on November
4th, 1889. Things began to look better, financially,
for Rath­
bun and his railways.
With great expectations,
the Napanee, Tamworth
and Quebec R~
was renamed
the Kingston, Napanee and
Western Railway.
From Yar­
ker, on this line, an additional
four miles of track was constructed
to Harrowsmith
in 1889. Running rights were granted to the K.N.!
W.Ry over the Kingston and Pembroke
Railway for entry into King­
ston from Harrowsmith.
The City of Kingston granted Rathbuns
railway a subsidy of seventy-five
thousand dollars.
By order of Parliament
in 1896, the Bay of Quinte Railway and
Page 214 Canadian Rail
Navigation Company amalgamated with the Kingston, Napanee and West­
ern Ry. Co. to form the Bay of ~uinte Railway Company.
In 1898, iron ore deposits were reported north of the village
of Tweed, and Rathbun received a Provincial subsidy to extend his
rail line to this area. Construction began in 1902 and was com­
pleted on December 12, 1903 to Bannockburn in the Township of Ma­
doc, approximately twenty-two miles north.
After the extension of the line to Madoc Township, Rathbuns
ambitions lessened insofar as the Bay of ~uinte Railway was
concerned, although it is estimated that he had invested over
one and a quarter million dollars in the venture. Agreements
were made with Mackenzie and Manns Canadian Northern Ontario
Railway to operate the line.
Rathbun finally sold the Bay of ~uinte Railway to the Can­
adian Northern Railway. The Bay of ~uinte Railway, as a con­
stituent railway of the Canadian Northern System, entered into
the Canadian National Railways in 1919. Although the line
between Yarker and Bannockburn has been long since abandoned, the
section between Deseronto and Napanee is operated as a spur track
while the section from Napanee to Harrowsmith forms part of the
C.N.R. freight-only line from Napanee to Ottawa. Since the
dissolution of the eN-CP Pool agreements, affecting the Ottawa­
Toronto passenger service, it has been suggested that the CNR
re-establish passenger service rrom Ottawa to Napanee, connecting
with the Montreal-Toronto trains at Belleville. Such a service,
if inaugurated, would make use of the rail line originally pro­
moted by the charcoal king from Deseronto, Edward Wilkes Rath-
bun. The case presently rests with the Board of Transport
Commissioners.
The Canadian
improving through 1965.
construction,
work was
important,
the museum
basis.
MUSEUM PROGRESS REPORT 1965
..• Fred Angus
Railway Museum has continued building and
Although lack of funds prevented major
carried on on smaller projects,
and, most
was opened to the public on a 5-day-a-week
In the spring, work was done on ballasting
and improving
previously
laid track, and, by the end of June, work had begun on
laying new track. Between then and October 9, a line was built
along most of the north side of the property and was connected
to
the existing trackwork
near the future site of the turntable.
While this did not approach the amount of track laid last year, the
new line provides much needed storage space for rolling stock, so
that the 5 engines formerly on the Candiac Spur, as well as 3 new
acquisitions
are now on the property,
and the main interchange
track is clear.
In other construction,
the section house built by the
members during the winter of 1964-65 was placed in service.
One
end contains an office and telephone,
while the other end is used
for storing tools and supplies.
A place is now assigned to each
tool, so reducing loss and misplacement.
This Autumn a foundation
is under construction
for Barrington
Station. The station will rest
on 12 footings composed of concrete blocks on concrete pads, and it
is hoped to move the station on to the foundation,
and continue its
restoration
this Winter. Nothing was done on
the second large disp­
lay building,
but if funds become available it is hoped that this
will be built in 1966. This building will be about the same size as
the present one, but will contain 6 tracks, and will allow most of
the deserving exhibits to be placed under cover.
Four new pieces of equipment came to Delson in 1965. The
first was locomotive
030 C 841 from the French National Railways
(SNCF). This engine, built in 1883, is the second oldest locomotive
at the museum, and was moved inside immediately
on its arrival on
May 12. In July, C.P.R. van 435288 arrived. This caboose had been
in continuous
service in Southern Ontario since it was built in
1884, and is still in good condition.
Outwardly,
it differs little
from its newer siblings as it has had changes over the years,
although it still runs on arch bar trUCks, a rarity on main line
vans today. 435288 was
used as a bunk car by members who worked grl
spent the night at Delson in the summer, and has been left outside
due to space limitations
and because the coupola does not clear the
doorways of the building,
as we found out the hard way one day!
The third acquisition
was C.P.R. diesel 7000. This unit was very
kindly donated by Marathon Paper Corp. who had owned it for over 20
years. Previously,
7000 had been owned by the C.P.R. and was in
fact C.P. s first diesel locomotive,
having been built by National
Steel Car in 1937. 7000 was restored by C.P.R. to its appearance
in
1937 when it ushered in the diesel era*and marked the beginning of
the end of the age of steam. Interestingl
y, when it was being moved
*
on the CPR which was some years behind CN in this
respect –Ed.
Page 216 Canadian Rail
into the museum on July 17, it was for a time coupled to 5935, the
last steam engine built for the C.P.R., 12 years after 7000. This
historic diesel was also placed inside on arrival, and may some day
run again to move heavier equipment around the museum. The 1923
Seagrave fire engine donated by the City of Outremont was driven to
Delson on its own power in November, accompanied by curious atten­
tion. When a suitable water supply becomes available the engine w.Ul
provide valuable protection with its 1000-gallon-per-minute strearra
At present there are 82 pieces of equipment at the museum, of which
41, or axactly half, are under cover.
On Sunday, June 6, the museum was opened to the public
daily except Saturday and Monday from 1:00 to 5:00 P.M. ~ugh no
outside advertising was done, there were about 200 visitors the
first day, and very many more during the 4 months the museum
remained open. Later there were features on Delson in the news­
papers and on the teleVision, and as a result, attendance increased
greatly. Next year, when more facilities are available, the museum
will be more widely publicized. After the closing for the winter, a
special exhibition was held October 28 for executives of corporat­
ions and institutions who have helped the project in the past with
generous donations. The rolling stock was specially pwced and
cleaned for the occaSion, temporary lights were hung and supplied
by a portable generator, and some of the smaller exhibits were dis­
played in a case, suitably illuminated. Despite an unseasonable
snowstorm, the exhibition was very successful, the guests coming by
chartered Dayliner 9111, and remaining about an hour and a half.
About this time it was realized that a new system of
running the museum was necessary. Accordingly, the existing
committees were dissolved, and a single governing body, the Cana­
dian Railway Museum CommisSion was established. Seven CommiSSioners
were elected by those members who work regularly at or for the
project. The Commissioners serve a term of one year, and all memb­
ers 16 years of age and older who work at least one third of the
working days at Delson, or equivalent service, may vote at the
elections held at the beginning of each year! The CommiSSion, which
held its first meeting November 7, will henceforth be responsible
for operating the museum, display, restoration of equipment, and
will provide more unified organization than several separate,
loosely defined committees.
After the start of November, as much of the equipment as
possible was placed inside for the winter. The most spectacular
move was on November 27, a cold rainy day, when C.P.R. 2-10-4
Selkirk No. 5935 was moved inside to the end of track 4. This is
possibly the largest engine under cover in any railway museum in
the world, and it cleared the doorway by less than i-inch when
pushed in by diesel 8467. When all available space inside was occu­
pied, mUCh, regrettably, had to stay outside. Protective measures
were taken on some of the engines, such as a temporary coat of
black paint, covers on smokestacks, and applications of grease and
oil. It is hoped that by another winter the more vulnerable items
will be in a new building.
Canadian Rai 1
Page 217
Work is expected to continue at Delson most of the winter
at first on Barrington
Station, and then, with the coming of Spring
a great effort will be needed to complete the program for 1966. The
success of the project depends very greatly on the support of the
members, and, as many skills are required,
nearly everyone is
welcome at the work sessions. If this support continues,
the entire
museum project will make great progress in 1966.


••• the largest .•• cleared
the doorway by
less than
t-inch when pushed in ••.
••• the rolling
stock was spe­
cially placed
for the occa-
sion •••••
Page 218
Canadian Rai 1
The RAWDON Subdivision
by Glenn Cartwright.
A tiny two-coach train Vlould
wait at Gohier for the change from
electric to steam power. This acc­
omplished, the train would trundle
along the lAssomption Subdivision,
entraining passengers at Ahuntsic
and Pointe aux Trembles. At a place
called Paradis, the train would turn
on to the Rawdon Subdivision and
travel up the remaining 15.8 miles
to its ultimate destination,Rawdon.
But as was the case on so many
small branch lines, patronage decl­
ined and passenger service was cur­
tailed. By the middle 1950s it
had been entirely eliminated. Still
the occasional wayfreight Vlould
wander
up to Rawdon with a box car
or two, and perhaps a hopper car
laden with gravel from the not-too­
distant Joliette quarries. In the
early 1960s, the only train to vi­
si t Rawdon one year Vias in the month
of December in order to receive a
load of Christmas trees.
It
when the
from the
sioners
division.
came as no surprise, then,
CNR applied ior perml.ssion
Board of Transport Commis­
to abandon the Rawdon Sub-
Upon approval of
the Board, the CNR
terse notice:
the plan by
issued this
Pursuant to the authority given
by order No. 112440 of the Board
of Transport Commissioners for
Canada, dated October 23, 1963,
all rail operation on Rawdon
Subdivision, between Rawdon,
mileage 0.0, and St. Jacqu~s,
mileage 8.5, will be discontin­
ued effective 12:01 a.m., Honday
December
16, 1963.
110ntreal Area,
November 4, 1963.
In May of 1964, a small work
train, including crane No. 50371,
proceeded up the now officially
abandoned stretch of the subdivi­
sion to Rawdon. The crane began to
dismantle the turntable which,it is
to be assumed, was sold for its
scrap value. Next the yard trackage
in front of the station was torn up.
NoVi came the hard task of dis­
assembling the huge trestle which
spanned Hanchester Falls and carried
the C1~ right-of-way into Rawdon.
For this complicated job, a heavy
piece of machinery known as a
Bridge and tank car was brought
in. Slowly the heavy steel girders
were cut apart and swung into wait­
ing gondolas. lIi thin a few weeks
the steel deck had been completely
dismantled and the large timbers at
each end of the structure had been
pulled out of position by bulldoz­
ers.
All that remained were the
massive concrete pillars which had
supported the bridge so nobly for
many decades.
After thiS, the work began to
progress more rapidly and the sid­
ing, which had been installed on
the Vlest side of the trestle to
facilitate its dismantling, was re­
moved. Similarly Vias the track to
mileage 1.5 known as Hamilton,
where the old Brouillette Sand Com­
pany siding was torn up. By mid­
July the rails had been removed as
far as St. Alexis and a few days
later the conditions of abandonment
(Continued on Page 223)
Notes
and News
* One of the most controversial
aspects of the new rail passenger
schedules introduced
last month has been the service provided
between Toronto and Ottawa. Unions, businessmen,
citizens and members
of Parliament
have all complained
of the deterioration
in passenger operations
between the two capitals.
Prime Min­
ister Pearson has promised to look into the matter, but as yet
has made no announcement.
Criticisms
continue, one comment
describing
the present dayliner service as nothing but a glori­
fied street car.
* Its all how you look at itl While the Toronto-Ottawa
service
has been described as a streetcar,
the North Bay Nugget has
described the new Toronto-North
Bay RDC service as a new look,
smooth as a subway ride, and modernizing
of service.
* The Board of Transport Commissioners
has completed its investi­
gation into the proposed discontinuance
of theDominion.
It
was indicated,
however, that it will be some time before judg­
ment is rendered.
* Also before the Board is the Canadian Pacifics proposal to
discontinue
its two daily passenger trains between Montreal and
Megantic, ~ue. Opponents of the move have suggested almost
everything
from the employment
of lady conductors
to the showing
of movies to coach passengers.
A more serious criticism,
how­
ever, was directed at the CPR for not informing the public when
the service was resumed
after the proposed cancellation
last
year.
* Canadian National has announced that its Canrailpass
scheme, whereby
visitors to Canada can purchase unlimited coach travel
for ,0 days for $99, is being extended to visitors from the U.S.
between October and April. The original plan was effective
only for travellers
from overseas, but was valid throughout
the
year.
* Why should this faciE ty not be made available to Canadians as
well? Mr.Fernand
Drapeau, a member of Montreals
civic ex­
ecutive committee and president of the Union of Municipalities
of ~uebec has proposed a policy whereby Canadians could obtain
a ticket valid for ,0 days entitling them to travel anywhere in
Canada ••• for $50. He said this would create the opportunity
for Canadians of the various parts of the country to know each
other better and would promote national unity.
* MeanWhile,
the Canada Centennial
Commission
will spend over
$600,000 in 1966 to send 4,100 youths for a look at their
country.
* Canadian Pacific has been requested by the Mayor of Trenton
to add a passenger stop at the Ontario town to the schedules
of the Royal York and Chateau Champlain. The
scenic-domed M
ontreal-Toronto
trains pause briefly at Trenton for crew­
change.
Page 220
Canadian Rail
NOTES and NEWS –Continued
• Canadian Locomotive Company
Limited -one of the best-known
names in Canadian railway history -is now no more. Effective
July 26th the corporate name of the company was changed
to
Fairbanks Morse (Canada)
Limited.
The C.L.C. was one of
the pioneers in the development
of Canadian locomotives,
and
many original designs were outshopped
by the Kingston Viorks.
The Nationals
first Mountain-type
engines were Canadian Loco­
motive Company products, as were also the CNs first Northerns.
The Company also assembled the pioneer North American road
diesel-electric
and Canadian Pacifics more recent diesel­
hydraulic switchers.
• A new passenger station and freight terminal was opened by
CN at Pembroke, Ontario, November 10th. In a single-storey
brick building there is a modern waiting room for passengers,
offices far ticket agents and operating staf~ as well as
facilities
of ON Telecommunications.
Linked to this structure
is a modern express-freight
shed.
* Canadian Railways water links.
Canadian Nationals
Aquatrain,
the tug and barge service be­
tween Prince Rupert and Whittier, Alaska, is now being operated
by a powerful new tug Mogul. The
new tug, Which tows
the 20
car barge Griffco and a new 30 car barge Griffson, completed
her first return voyage in the record time of 7t days. The
best previous time was more than nine days.
Canadian Pacific Steamships
will not use any substitute
ves­
sel while the Princess of Acadia is in drydock for refit and
inspection.
The ferry, which operates between Saint John, N.B. and Digby,
N.S. will be out of service November 4
to December 3.
• The elimination
of the N.B.-P.E.I.
ferries, operated by CN, was
brought a step closer recently with the awarding of a contract
for the first phase in the construction
of the causeway-bridge­
tunnel link between the mainland and the Island Province.
The Diamond
Construction
Co. Ltd. of Fredericton
was the lowest of
three tenderers for construction
of approach highways and em­bankments
at the N.B. end of the project.
The railway embank­
ment, parallel to the highway, will extend five miles from the
present C.N.R. line to Jourimain Island. The 148 million dollar
scheme calls for a three mile causeway, a three and a half mile
bridge, a man-made
island one mile long, in which will be the
beginning of a mile-long tunnel. The tunnel will reach the
surface at the PEl end on a second causeway, also one mile long.
The tunnel section is necessary to provide a 32 foot deep ship
channel, and to allow for the passage of ice in Northumberland
Strait. Shown below is a cross section of the tunnel portion
of the link.
~—————————82. 0—————————–1
BALlAST RAILBEO
Cana dian Ra i 1
Page 221
~ CNs recent order for 30 diesel-electric
locomotives
is to
consist of 10 GP-40 road switchers from General Motors Diesel
Limited of Lonaon;-Ontario,
and 20 Century 424s from Montreal
Locomotive Works. 10
GP-40s 3000 h.p. CNR #4002 to 4011 Class GR-30a
to be delivered by next July by GMD Ltd of London, Ont.,
equipped with dynamic brakes but not the Extended Dy­namio
Brake as provided on lf4000 -400l.
20 Century 424s 2400 h.p. CNR #3202 to 3221 Class MR-24b
to be delivered during the first haIt or 1966 by M.L.W.,
equipped with dynamio brakes. A number of older diesels
are to be turned in to Montreal Looomotive Works by
CN
as trade-inns
on part of this order. Road numbers
of
the units to be retrred will be governed by ciroumstanoes
at the time.
~ The eight GMD-built units for the Ontario Governments
Toronto
oommuter service will be essentially
GP-40s, but elongated to
provide for apparatus to generate ourrent for train lighting
and heating.
Passenger coaches to be used in the servioe will
be heated eleotrioally
by head-end power.
~ Nine of the Ontario Governments
Hawker-Siddley
built passenger
oars are to be self-propelled,
powered by
Rolls Royoe diesel en­
gines. Both the self-propelled
units and the locomotive-hauled
coaches are to seat 125 passengers.
~ Toronto Metropolitan
areas left out of the Provincial
oommuter
experiment
are planning a battle to be included in the scheme.
Hamilton, Oshawa, and
Barrie are all unhappy about being excluded
and are expected to lead the assault.
In this connection,
some words
of wisdom from Mr. W.E.P.Duncan
of the Region Transportation
Study group: No one believes that a Metro Toronto commuter rail­
way service will pay for itself ••••••• the best hope, at least in
the beginning,
is that a commuter
service will take upwards of
10,000 motorists off the road as a contribution
towards reducing
traffic congestion.
~ Following a hearing November 25th by the Ontario Transportation
Study Group, the City of Hamilton was assured that it would be
incorporated
into the Toronto area commuter plan on a limited
scale. Hamilton civic authorities
agreed to a service of
hourly trains (as compared to the basic service of trains every
twenty minutes) for a trial period to prove that suoh a service
is required.
~ A topping-off
ceremony was
held Nov.24th on the new CN
Tower building at Edmonton. The
structure
incorporates
the Nationals
new Edmonton
Station in its ground floor
and bas emen t •
~ As the last Pool Train left
Windsor Station, Montreal, Octob
er 30th, photographer
Robert Half yard recorded th
is view of C.P.R. 121
departing for Toronto.
Page 222 Canadian Rail
a You can take away commuter trains —force the family to
drive to their vacation spot —and send the businessman to
the airport, but •••• Grey Cup Specials!!l Westerners are
still incandesoent over the CPRs decision not to run any
Grey Cup Specials to Toronto this year. From Calgary to
Winnipeg, it is felt the company has relegated both towns and
cities to non-entities. Canadian Pacific, however, has fol­
lowed the refusal by announcing that they will not be granting
any special rates for group travel from Eastern Canada to the
West this year. Shortage of motive power and the condition of
passenger equipment were the reasons given by a CPR spokesman.
a CNs modern and spacious new station at Newcastle, N.B. was placed
in operation November 17th last. The new structure, replacing
the former station built about the turn of the century, features
contemporary design and provides more comfortable facilities for
the travelling public and shippers.
a The Canadian Nationals transcontinental line is now completely
operated by Centralized Traffic Control, except for the section
between Boston Bar, B.C. and Jasper, Alta., where automatic block
signals are in use. The 236 mile Jasper-Edmonton section was
completed in November. C.T.C. was first used by CN during the
Second World War on its main lines in the Maritime Provinces. In
1958, the Railway began a programme to install the Control along
its main transcontinental line, and the recently-completed section
finishes the work.
a Canadian National Railways pavillion at Expo 67, to be located
on Ile Notre Dame, oPPosite the theme pavillion Man, the Producer
is being erected by Janin Construction Ltd. of Montreal. C.N.R.
has not yet divulged what they will exhibit, but states that time
and motion will be the theme. Motion will be demonstrated by a 70
mm. moving picture on a 60 ft. wide screen. The time exhibit
will be nine individual cells known as polyhedrons, a geometric
pattern put together on a modular principle which permits maximum
flexi bili ty.
a Wage increases, longer vacations, and extra paid statutory holi­
days are amongst the contract demands served by railway workers
on Canadian railways. Shop crafts, clerical workers, and other
non-operating unions are involved in the requests which are esti­mated
to be worth about $120 million per year. The present con­
tracts expire at the end of the current year.
a The City of London, Onto got out of the railway business Dec. 23rd,
when the Council voted to trade the London and Port Stanley Rail­way
to the CNR in exchange for the National System~ London Car
Shops and other real estate. The CN is moving the shops operations
to Toronto and Montreal, and expects to take over the L.& P.S. during
the first half of 1966.
a Chicago & North Western Railway, by means of holiday greeting cards
placed on the seats of outward bound commuter trains, announced to
its most faithfully-regular fare-paying passengers,(i.e.commuters)
that their fares would remain unchanged for the fourth consecutive
year. Informed sources said that an additional ten double-deck
cars may be ordered in 1966 to further up-grade the service.
Canadian Rail
Page 223
K The new
Railiner service between Brockville-Toronto-London,
inaugu­
rated Dec. 15th by ONR, was given an enthusiastic
reception by
the press, politicians
and other guests, who participated
in a
preview run December 1st. The passengers
were delighted with
the comfort of the cars, specially designed for the service, fea­
turing swivelling
and reclining seats in which the traveller can
relax in air-conditioned
comfort at 90 miles an hour ….. ..
Let us hope that the fare-paying
passengers
will be as con­
tinuously enthusiastic.
K From Owen Sound, however, the rail passenger picture does not
look so bright. Canadian National is talking of discontinuing
passenger operations
between Palmers ton and Owen Sound and be­
tween Stratford and Goderich.
Even the Owen Sound
Sun-Times,
in
an editorial,
says the proposal comes as no surprise.
In fair­
ness to both the CNR and the CPR, they have tried reduced fares,
have speeded up the service, put on better cars, etc. But the
passengers
themselves
have not responded •••••••
X
Improvements,
service cuts, fare changes, commuters –be what
they may, it is passenger services that make the news and form the
show-window
for the railroad industry.
And CN has one of the most­
watched show-windows
in North America today. Consequently,
all
eyes are on Mr.Jean H. Richer, appointed vice-president
of passenger
sales and services in mid-December.
He succeeds Pierre Delagrave,
who has resigned to accept a senior position in Domtar, Limited.
Mr. Richer, 47, has been manager of CNs Champlain Area since 196,.
He is no stranger to the problems of moving passengers,
for from
1946 to 1962 he was with the Montreal Transportation
Commission,
rising to the position of Director of Transportation
Services.
The new
ON VP is quoted as saying I did not take this position over to
bring about the interment of passenger train travel. My whole back­
ground and experience
has been dealing not With train service, but
with passengers.
(Continued
from Page 218)
were fulfilled,
the track having
disappeared
up to mileage 8.5, one­
half mile east of St. Jacques.
This was not the first time
Rawdon had been deserted by a rail­
way. In the late 1850s the Indus­
try Village and Rawdon Railway a­
bandoned its line from Rawdon to
what is now Joliette. (see C.R.H.A.
News Report No. 109, March, 1960.)
The job was completel
The CNR
had been successful
in deserting
their unprofitable
spur. The sta­
tion remains, as do the freight
Sheds which are still used by the
trucks that handle CNR express to &
from the town. But as far as the rail
service is concerned,
Rawdon lies a­
bandoned once more.
Hollow Victory
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
this piggybacking …. we just made room 011 the highway for MORE blasted trucks!
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
esla61ilhtJ 1932 • :Box 22 . Station 13 . Jv!Dnlretsl 2 . Qut6tc • 8n(orporllft4 1941
CANADIAN RAIL: Published eleven times annually by the Publications Committe,
Canadian Railroad Historical Association. Subscription included
with Associate Membership: $4.00 annually.
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS CO~lHITTEE: David R. Henderson
EDITOR, CANADIAN RAIL: Anthony Clegg
1illiam Pharoah
John ~. Saunders
Frederick F. Angus
Hyman Mandel
Robert Half yard
Orner Lavallee
,Iilliam Fowle
ASSISTANT EDITOR:
DI STRI BUTI ON:
COMMITTEE:
SUBSCRIBERS!
BEFORE YOU IUOVE-WRITE!
ADVERTISING MANAGER: S.S. IYorthen
~1ichael Leduc
AI len81 5 week!! before you
nio,c, seDrl us a feller, a card.
or II IIoI1-or(ic:c ellllll,c-O(.
.ddre6J (orm telling UI both your
OLD ami your NEW adclreues.
MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY:
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
OTTAWA VALLEY:
PACIFIC COAST:
SASKATCHEWAN:
ROCKY MOUNTAIN:
FAR EAST:
BRITISH ISLES:
Copyrilht 1965
Kenneth F. Chivers, Apartment 3, 67 Somerset Street West, Ottawa, Onto
Peter Cox, 2936 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
J.S. Nicolson, 2306 Arnold Street, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
V.H. Coley, 11243-72 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta
1illiam D. McKeown, 900 Oaza Senriyama, Suita City, Osaka, Japan
John H. Sanders, 10 Church St., Ampthill, Bedsford, England

Demande en ligne