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Canadian Rail 171 1965

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Canadian Rail 171 1965

~a:n..ad ·
)~~nn
Trees have now become apartments -­
now busses –but in 1950, electric
servioe on the private right-of-way
between Cartierville and Val Royal.
Number 171 / November 1965
the trams are
trams provided
past Tolhurst
–Anthony Clegg

1k WINTER T~
The princjpal highlight of this Autumn
Change-of-Tirne is the elimination of
the Pool arrangements between the Ca­
nadian Pacific and the Canadian Nat­
ional Railways in the three pool zcnes,
The divergent attitude of the two com­
panies immediately became appatent in
plans for the Montreal-Toronto s~rv­
ice. Canadian Pacific discontinued
its overnight trains Nos.2l-22 and be­
gan an afternoon service, using stain­
less steel equipment and dome cars
taking 5 hours 45 minutes for the trip
with intermediate passenger stops at
Montreal West,Smiths Falls and Leas ide.
Fares were increased, and are from 90
cents to $1.50 more than CNR fares on
the same days. No.2l _is called the
Royal York while 22 bears the name
of CPls uncompleted Montreal hotel,
Le Chateau Champlain.
On the Ottawa-Toronto line CPR removed
its overnight pool trains 33 and 34,
lJ8 Peterborough, and replaced them
with morning Dayliners over the same
route with the same numbers. An af­
ternoon service is provided by Day­
liners 261-262 which connect with the
new 21 and 22 at Smiths Falls. Ser­
vice between Smiths Falls and Brock.­
ville is not shawn in the public tims­
tables, but trains continue to run as
Passenger Extras. No convenient con­
nection exists between Kingston and
Ottawa.
Trains No. 33 and 34 replace
former trains 380 and 383 between To­
ronto and Peterborough. There is thus
a net decrease of one train each way
between Toronto and Ottawa, an (1 one
t
rain betw,.,en Toronto and Pcterbrough.
Whilu on
th~ dubject of CPR service
cuts, a few others were mad~ outs ide
F.A.Kemp
Montreal-Toronto, Ottawa-Toronto, and
hlontreal-Quebec/Levie. Each railway
ie now free to pursue its Olm policy jn
regard to services and fares in these
three areas.
the former pool territory. Trains 31
and
32, the Alouette made their last
runs between 1rontreal and Newport, vt.,
September 20th, while trains 2l7-21A
ended
service between Farnham and Sut­
ton,Que., ten days earlier. July 19
was the last date for passenger serdce
between Newport and Wells River, Vt.
On the Montreal-Ottawa line, No. 232
was combined
with No.4 on Sept. 7th. lb.
235
survived as an RDC train until the
change of time, when No.3 was given an
earlier departure time from Montreal.
There are thus only 5 CPR trains be-
tween Montreal and Ottawa.. Local
trains 213-214 between Montreal and Farnham were
discontinued on Saturdays
and train-204, Montreal-Sherbrooke on
Saturday was replaced by train 206.
There
are now only 28 trains arriving
at and leaving Windsor Station
t
Mont­
real (on a 5-days-s~ek basis).
Trains 3, h, 13, and 14, The Dominion
are still sholm in the timetables with
sleepers Montreal & Toronto to Sudbury
and
Ft.William-Winnipeg, and with the
CPR I S only remaining standard parlor
cars between Montreal and Ottawa, but
the continued operation is dependent
upon a decision of the Board of Trans­
port Conunissioners, Meanvrhile trains
1 and 2 havv had more intermediate
stops added and their times lengthened
by 90 minutes westbound and 70 minutes
eastbound. (Diesel units 1421-1432
are being re-converted for freight BeI­
vice),
The International Limited. Upper photo shows the first
run of the famous train in the PoolN, April 2nd., 1933,
headed by ON 5704. The lower view, thirty two and a half
years later, shoVis the final departure of the train from
OPs Montreal West Station. Diesel units on this run on
OctobeI 30th. ,1965 were eN 6520, 6618, 6523: Engineer: E·
Langlois; Fireman: D. Skeloher.
(Photos: R.V.V.Nicholls, B.Biglow Details: E.L.Modler)
Page 184
The revised services east of Toronto
make it impossible to make a through
trip via CPR from Montreal to Detroit,
Chicago, Hamil ton, or Buffalo, or from
points west of Detroit to points east
Trains disoontinued.
Canadian Rail
of Toronto. It is interesting to note
that No.322 The Ontarian from Buffalo and
New York is shown as a Hamil ton
connection for No. 34, although both
are timed at 900 at Toronto.
263-264
232-235
Ottawa-Brockville (connection for Pool 6 & 15)
Montreal…()ttawa
31-32
218-219
380-383 303-304 Montreal-N ewport-Wells R j.ver
~ Vt. Farnham-3utton
(Friday only)
Toronto-Peterborough (repla ced by 33-34)
Toronto-Port McNicoll (twice weekly boat train)
CANADIAN NATIONAL
While Canadian Pacific makes no secret
of its desire to rid itself of passen­
ger services, Canadian National con-
tinues to entice passengers with more
frequent services, amid much publicity.
Following is a list of new trains!
29-30 Exc • Sa turday RAPIIXl M ontreal-Toronto 607-608
Daily (Dec .15) Railiner, Brockville-Toronto-london
44-49 Daily BYlOWNER Montreal-Cttawa 614-615
Daily Railiner, Mort real-Sherbrooke
On the Montreal -Toronto ljne, the
aboll tion of the pool was the signal
for (}j to take up the speed war where
it was left off in 1932. Spearheaded by
re-geared aM diesel units, instead
of high-wheeled Hudsons, the Rapido
was inaugurated by the Mayors of its
terminal cities over closed-circuit TV
with high CN officials in attendance.
Champagne bottles were broken over
the locomotive fronts (what a waste)
corsages were given to the passen­
gers, along with other souvenirs, free
photographs, menus, etc, etc. The
first Rapido trains consisted of
Number Old name
three diesel units, three coaches, one
dining car and two parlor cars, the
latter having 2-and-l reclining seats.
First and last cars carried the word Rapido
in black on the white lower
panel. The trains are scheduled in 4
hours, 59 minutes, with two brief sUps
to change engine crews at Brockville &
Belleville Yard. The other Montreal -Toronto
trains have been renamed, and
two of them have had running times
quickened. Locals 27 -28 now run
through to Toronto, replacing 9 and 10. Following
is a list of other trains on
this line with old and new names and
running times.
New name Old time New time
5
& 14 LaSalle-International Limited Lakeshore 6h 15 6h 15
15 & 6 Internatl Ltd -InterCity Ltd. Bonaventure 6h 15 5h 50
17 & 16 InterCity Ltd -Maple Leaf Cavalier 7h 15 7h 35 WB.
7h 45 8h 01 EB.
7
& 8 Lakeshore Express (Holidays) Premier 5h 40 5h 30
Canadian Rai 1
Page 185
111_.
Vl/lTIllIIea __
_ ITI fl).ITI~II~
During the next few months, eN passenger train personnel and
express freight motormen lIill sport new uniform styles. Because
uniform design is so complex, detailed, sensitive and potentially
effective, it has talten the C.N.H. three years of intensive study
to produce a program which seems to meet all the needs. A series
of pilot programs has been arrunged to develop emC110yee and cust­
omer reaction, as well as to test new fabrics, new badges and new
styles in actual service.
One phase in the System uniform program has already been
seen: the bright blue jach:ets vlOrn by ticket salesmen in most major
terminals.
Train crews and sleeping and dining car crews will appear in
their new uniforms for the first time on a number of the trains in
the Toronto-llontreul service by December. Red cotton jackets will
be .forn by waiters and porters on most parts of the System within a
month or two. Station employees at l·lontreals Central Station will
also be making their bow in their redesigned uniforms shortly, as
will express freight drivers at Regina, Vancouver and London.
Following their introduction, the uniforms will be carefully
observed in service, and the reaction and views of employees and
customers will be sought. Then there will be a period of adjust­
ment and reconsideration of details. It will take about three years
before all uniformed employees on the C.N. System are outfitted.
Recent purchases of fu:ld RDC units from
U. S. railroads are becoming apparent
in the schedules as new trains 607 and
608 will begin running betvreen Brock­
ville and London, Onto on December 15.
These trains will provide a morning
service into Toronto, a noon-time ser­
vice from Toronto to London, and a
late afternoon-evening servjce London­
Toronto-Brockville. Train 607 has a
lay-over in Toronto, but 60/l will stop
for only 15 minutes.
Railiners have also re-appeared on the
llontreal-Sherbrooke-Coaticook service,
where they werp. used several years ago.
A
new train 614-615 has been included
in the schedule, re-establishing the
connection to Quebec via Richmond.
Continued on P.186-187.
o~ the Montreal~t~wa line a new
noon-time service numbered 44-49 and
named By towner was introduced, lfh1 Ie
morning trains 47-48 are now named
nGa tineau and aftrnoon trains 46-51
bear the name Laurier. There are
now seven CN trains between Montreal
and Ottawa (including 103, which takes
passengers only from Dorval).
On the Montrea1-Chicoutimi line, pass­
engers may now leave two hours later
on Saturday night, by taking train No.
120 at 11:00 p.m. Is this for the
convenience of hockey fans?
In the Montreal-Quebec service, both
railways are operating their trains as
before. No additions have been made
Continued on P. 200-201.
New look for dining car walters
includes bright red cotton jacket.
Host
of the dining car, the Steward,
will wear new light grey jacket and
dark grey trousers.
Canadian Rail Page 187
Continued from Page 185.
The following is a brief description of the new uniform de­
signs, as outlined in the C. N. magazine Keeping Track:
TRAIN COiIDUCTOR:
The Train Conductor wears a charcoal grey suit with me tallic gold
trim. On the left side of his jacket is a shiny gold CN symbol.
silhouetted against the dark grey cloth. His cap is in the tradi­
tional shape but is distinguished by a gold coloured band completely
encircling the cap just above the brim. On his sleeve in addition
to his service bars will be two gold braid rings which denote the
highest level of command in train service.
TRAnn1AN:
The trainmans hatband and CN symbol badge are silver but otherwise
his uniform is exactly the same as the conductor·s. To point out
the distinction in echelon. the trainman wears just one silver band
on his sl eeve.
SLEEPING CAR CONDUCTOR:
The top roan on the SD&P car side is attired very much like the train
conductor. with gold badges. However, in S&D service there is no
sleeve braid. This facilitates the interchanGe of men between ser­
Vice as a conductor and as a porter, and they need only to change
their badges and cap bands.
PORTER:
The slee?ing car porter and parlor car attendant each wears a char­
coal grey suit, silver CN symbol and red band around their cap.
This is to match the bright red cotton jackets that they Vlear while
working aboard their car.
DliHtlG CAR STEWARD:
Haitre D of the dining car greets his guests wearing a light grey
Vlorsted jacket with charcoal grey trousers. The jacket has been
designed to make the steward readily identifiable as the host.
DIllING CAR WAITER:
The waiter will wear the same red cotton jacket as porters. with
white shirt and black tie. As part of the uniform program. bow
ties are to disappear .>.nd the four-in-hand tie is to become univer­
sal.
STATIOW·jASTER:
The roan in charge of major stations wears the charcoal grey suit
wi th gold trim. The assistant stationmaster who performs many of
the same functions, also wears gold.
GAlEHAN:
Gatemen, ticket collectors, baggage staff and other station employ­
ees lear the charcoal grey sui t with silver trim.
EXPJ(ESS FREIGHT VEHICLE J.10TOilliAN:
The vehicle driver in express freight services is recognized as a
key roan in customer contact worl and his uniform must be smart and
neat at all times. The new styles should help him create a Good
first impression. The uniform still employs the Eisenhower jacket
bu t is tailored in the charcoal grey cloth. A nevI type of hinged
sleeve offers full freedom of action without excessive bulk.
Page 188 Canadian Rail
CN 8 6218 vis its U. S.A.
by Joseph A. Nannix.
AUGUST 21, 1965 —
Today, a colourful and unique page of railroad history was re­
opened to the delight of railway men of the Central Vermont, resi­
dents of the State of Vermont and visitors from allover the United
States and Canada.
It all started at 5:15 a.m. at st. Albans, Vermont, when engin­
eer George Gay,a veteran with fifteen years of Central Vermont Rail­
way service, pulled back the throttle on the Canadian Nationals
6218. The 399,600 pound steam locomotive was loaned to the Central
Vermont by CN specially for the occasion. This engine and its two
passenger cars made up the first passenger steam drawn train run in
eight years over Central Vermont. The big Northern type engine was,
however, no stranger to CV tracks, having once been the regular mot­
ive power on the top notch trains, the Washingtonian and the Mont­
realer.
The run was to consist of a round trip from st. Albans to White
River and return to st. Albans, and later in the afternoon back to
Vlliite River Junction. It was sponsored by the Branford Electric
Railway of East Haven, Connecticut, with the cooperation of both the
Canadian National and the Central Vermont.
Under
engineer Gays skilled hand, the 6218, resplendent in new
paint, was hitting thirty;five miles an hour by the time the train
cleared the St. Albans yard limits. It wasnt long before additional
passengers had been collected at Essex Junction. Hontpelier soon
vanished down the track, hidden behind a veil of wispy white smoke.
Shortly thereafter, vlhistle roaring its challenge and be11 clanging,
the 6218 brou~ht her train to a stop in Northfield, the home of Nor­
wich Military College, sometimes called the Vlest Point of Vermont.
It was rather fitting that a stop for water be made at this town,
because in the days of steam,trains always stopped at Northfield for
water. Northfield was also once the site of the shops of the Central
Vermont. f.ocomoti ves were even builtin these shops. Now the lack
of water facilities was offset by the volunteer fire department, who
manned a hose from a nearby hydrant. The men did their job well and
the 6218s thirst was quickly quenched.
Refreshed, and with a good head of steam provided by her fire­
man, Philip Ladd, the 6218 made short work of the 21.3 miles to
Randolph, Vermont. l~ountain mist still hung over Randolph and this
produced an almost eerie setting down by the station. Her whistle
blasts echoing in the still air and her hee.dlight blazing through
the thick mist, the 6218 and her train made an unusual sight for
those /ho might have seen them as they pasced through the town.
In no time at all, under the fleet drivers of the big steamer,
Bethel, South Royalton, and even the winding trackage along the
White River were left behind. Soon the train was in White River
Junc tion and the first run was over.
Large
,-, .. ould ride
crowds greeted the arrival. Hany of these same people
the northbound run to st. Albans and back. In all they
Canadian Rail Page 189
Photo: J.A.Mannix.
would total 350 passengers. The train they were soon to ride now
Vias made up of 12 cars, which included two open doored baggage cars
equipped for tape recordinG as well as sightseeing for those enthu­
siasts who like to breathe cinders and coal smoke.
The return trip to st. Albans, which left at 10 a.m., was quite
different from the early morning down trip. This time crowds greeted
the train at every crossing and station along its route. Photograph­
ers by the dozen paced the train in a long caravan of cars in which
they endeavoured to keep ahead of the train and obtain just one more
action photo. 1-1 any of these motorists lost the train completely
when they became locked in traffic at Bethel, due to an unexpected
parade.
State police ./ere ou t in force to re~uce speeding and control
con&estion at West Jraintree, the first of the scheduled photo stops
and later at a point bet,[cen East Granville and Roxbury I/here the
train disgorged almost the enUre 350 passengers onto route l2A.
which was already filled wi th a jumble of parked cars and photograph­
ers. One photographer had brought his oVin stepladder and Vias able
to stand above the croVid for his pictures.
It was a memorable day for everyone. ihose persistent enough
would see the train once acain on its return in late afternoon to
Ihi te River. After dark, a lucky few, perhaps at Bethel and Randolph
and other points, might also see the 6218 and a lone coach north­
bound put a close to a day in the Central Vermonts history which
could best be sur,lrned up as Engineer Gay said earlier of his run –
GOOD FUH.
Page 190 Canadian Rail
… of interest to Members …
A Canadian Rail reader in Japan has written to us, requesting a
railway-enthusiast pen-pal in Canada. He is 17 years old, SHOZO
NAKA}ruRA of 1458 Karoichiba, Katsushika, Tokyo, Japan. Hobbies:­
Collecting railroad pictures, tickets, and time-tables. He writes in
English very well; but wouldnt it be nice if one of our Canadian
members would write to him in Japanesel!!
Mr. Thomas L. Underwood, Jr., CRRfi member in Washington, DC, U.S.A.
writes to remind us that a train consisting of a London and North
Western Railway 2-2-2-2 locomotive No. 2054 Queen Empress, a 42-ft
sleeping car, and a 42-ft. 1st & 3rd Class/Baggage combine coach,was
shipped to North America for the Chicago Worlds Fair of 1893; forty
years before the trans-.lltlantic crossing of the L.M.S. Royal Scot.
After the closing of the Chicago Fair, the train, supplemen ted by two :JaSner
sleeping cars and a Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Ry.
dining car, ran from Chicago to New York over the LS&MS/NYC&Iffi rail­
roads, making several exhibition stops along the way.
EX!O 67 -ACCOl&10D,TION: Canadian Rail has received a request fur
information regarding accommodation in the
Expo 67 territory during the year 1967 —which started us think­
ing that there might be a number of others on both sides of the
tracks. If any member in the Greater Montreal area wishes to pro­
vide reasonably-priced accommodation for visitors, or if any out
of town member or subscriber wishes accom:nodation in Expo 67 terr­
i tory during 1967, we shall do our best to put the one in touch with
the other. Send us a note giving full details (including price­
requested/offered). Canadian Rail will help with this service,
but assumes neither obligation nor guarantees.)
DECEMBER EDITOR: The next issue of Canadian Rail –No.172, for
December, 1965 –will be compiled and edited by
W. L. Pharoah. Mr.Pharoah is regularly in charge of the Notes and
News section of the pUblication.
NOTICE OF MEETING:
The December meeting of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association
will be held in the ]l[cConnell Engineering Building at McGill Uni­
versity on December 8th at 8:15 p.m. Entertainment will be A Pot­
Pourri of Coloured Pictures. Members are invited to bring along up
to ten coloured slides of their own choice to show to the audience.
If you intend bringing slides, please inform Dr.Nicholls before-hand
so that an integrated programme can be arranged in advance.
C a na d ian R ail Page 191
On the following pages we are printing the roster of
electric railway rolling stock, operated by the Cal­
gary Municipal Railway, compiled from data supplied
by Mr. J. Meikle (author of the article in the May
issue) and Mr. R. Corley. This listing was origin
ally intended for the June issue, but its completion
has taken considerably more time than anticipated.
Notes on the roster:
Note 1:
Note 2;
Note 3:
Windows:
Doors:
Gearing:
All passenger cars were double-truck, single-end,
wooden cars, except as otherwise noted.
Cars received from Saskatoon in 1919 were rebuilt
from double-end to single-end by Calgary Munici­
pal Railway.
Numbers 1-12 and 16-18 originally had vertical
brake-levers:-back to brake, forward to release.
5×2 indicates five arched sections With two windows
per section.
6×2 indicates six arched sections with two win­
dows per section.
10 indicates Prairie type front door, Le., a 2nd.
door cut into right front dash for one-man operation.
Originally with a single door at front. All cars, ex­
cept trailers and single-truck Units, with read doors
for emergency use only, although a few were converted
to treadle operation for passenger-exit use.
All cars except #15, 18, 53, 84-92 had 69:15 gearing,
33 wheels. #15, 18, 53 had 63:15 helical gearing,
33 wheels. #84-92 inel. had 26 wheels.
Roof type: A -Arch roof D -Deok roof
M -Railway type monitor roof
Controllers and motors:
(fiue to spa ce limi t-..
ations, the following
symbols have been used)
Mary Ann, Calgarys
looomotive type Swee··
per .. plough. Official.,
ly designa ted H: the
uni twas buil t in 1928 by
Canadian Car & Fdy.
Limited, Montreal.
(Photo courtesy Mr.J.
Gush, Calgary Transit
System. ) F –
K6 controller with VffilOlBE motors.
G -K6 controller with VffilOlB2 motors.
H -K6 controller with GE80 motors.
J -K6 controller with GE67 motors.
K -KIO controller With GE80 motors.
KK -KIO controller with VffilOlB2 motors.
L -K3.5 controller with Vffi,510A2 motors.
LL -DK controller with DK 20 motors.

W
,.
d
0
.,
…..
]
k
..
0
..
Numbers.
Builder
&
date
…..
0

~
<=>
rJl
PASSENGER
CARS
Note
1
1 -8
Ottawa
1909
.5>:2
1-
44
Second
8
Ottawa
1912
.5>:2
1-
48
9 –
12
Preston
1909-
5>:2
1-
42
HIO
or44
13

1.5
Ottawa
1910
(,x2
~
S4
1(, –
18
Preston
1910
1(,>:2
1-
.52
19
-30
Preston
1910
31 -36
Preston
1911
8
11
32
8
1
3(,
Second
19 20 21 241
Preston
1913
28 33.
29 C.M.R.
1924
Seoond
2.51 ;0
rebuild
;2
Second
27
Ottawa
1912
Second
31
Preston
1912
Second
3(,
C.M.R. 1932
rebuild
(,>:2
2
12
2
6>:2
1-
5>:2
1-
37 -42
Preston
1911
5
:~
.
~
54 .50 5(,
48
48
46
ROSTER
OF
ROLLING
STOCK
Of
the
CALGARY
MUNICIPAL
RAILWAY.
k .,
rik riO
.d
..
0

..
~
kO

w
:>I
0

…..

006
~
..:l
>=
t)
41
6 44000
F
Brill
27G
41
6 44000 G
Brill
27C(CV)
41
6 442.50
F
Bemis
4.5
4(,
6
4&000
F
Brill
27G
4(,0
4(,000
I
F
I
Brill
27G
33
fb
3
2
0
K
I
Taylor
….
o o
po:
Compiled
from
data
by
J.Meikle
and
R.Corley.
(See
also
Canadian
Rail,
May
196.5.)
Remarks.
Mil
&
#2
rebl
t
with
treadle
rear
exits,
la
te
1920
s
fl8
burned,
rebl
t
as
#300.
Note
3.
M
Formerly
first
#78,
renumbered
0.1919.
MI
Ordered
in
1909.
Note
3.
MI
Equipped
with
couplers
for
trailers.
#1.5
later
had
GK
247
motors
from
Scenic
Car
and
1.5:(,3
gearing
for
Ogden
line.
114
body
preserved
for
some
time
as
relic
by
Calgary
Brewing
Co,
but
later
scrapped.
M
1116
equipd
with
coupler
for
trailers.
Note
3.
#16
reblt
in
1937
after
fire

arch
roof,
46500
Ibs.,
treadle
exit,
and
K3.5G
controller.
It
was
rebuilt
with
the
long
vestibule
forward,
the
only
car
thus
rebuilt
by
the
C.M.R.
118
to
GE
247
motors
.
15:63
gearing
for
Ogden
line
.
DI
Single-truck
cars
with
two
motors
-no
air
brakes.
Controllers
gradually
replaced
with
K(,
type.
#19,20,21,24,28,33
to
Saskatoon
in
1919.
i22
converted
to
double-end
c.1918;
dereliot
by
1944.
#26
reblt
to
Auxiliary.
#31
scrapped
c.1918.
#2.5,29,30,32
reblt
into
double-truck
cars
by C.M.R.
in
1924,
by
being
spliced
with
four
units
of
the
QToun
12,.27.,4..,6
4(,
(, 47000
G
Standard
0-50(CV)
1M
From
Saskatoon,
1919.
Note
2,
SUR
#20-2.5.
Later
converted
to
GE
80
motors.
Built
from
single-truok
oars,
series
19
to
3(,.
440
47000
H
Standard
0-50(CV)
D
Four
cars
(2.5,29,30,32)
spliced
with
tour
out
of
23, 27,
34,
35,
36

of
which
one
was
scrapped.
Doub1e-tru~k
rebuilds
later
converted
to
WH
101B2
motors
2q
wi
th
treadle
exit
:l,.l
L
l,?te
_
19
.
2
_
Q.~
__
_
4bb
4(,000 G
Brill
270 M Renumbered
from
#.57,
in
1944.
41(,
44000 G
Brill
27G
M Renumbered
from
#79,
0.1919.
41(,0
45000
F
Brill
27G
A
Originally
#8
(first)
built
Ottawa,
1909.
Rebuilt
C.M.R.as
#300
atter
fire.
Rebuilt
416
Brill
27G(CV)
again
by
C.M.R.as
#36(second)

treadle
exit.
44000 G M
#41-42
had
44
seats.
~

1912
1
6×2
.,.
466
,-
43
-48
Ottawa
56 46000 G
Brill
27G(CV)
M
49 }
Preston
1912 6×2
.,.
54
466
46500 G
Brill
27G(CV)
M
#49 had 56
seats.
51 -55 #53
to
GE
247
motors,
15
:
63
gearing
for
Ogden
line.
50 }
Ottawa
1912
6:<2
1-
52
466
46000 G
Brill
27G(CV)
M
#50
had
56
seats.
56 –
66
#57
renumbered
Second
27
in
1944.
#60
reblt.
CMR
1918
with
arch
roof
and
66
seats.
j63-66
had
couplers
for
hauling
trailers.
67

78
Ottawa
1912 5×2
1-
48
416
44000 G
Brill
27G(CV)
lA
#67 -72
rebuilt
C.M.Ry.
with
treadle
exits
,late
1920s
#68
reblt
Chffi
1920
with
arch
roof.
#67-68
with
K-35G
control.
#67-69
had
39
seats.
#70
to
GE
247
motors
and
41
seats.
#78
renumbered
Second
#8,
c.19l9.
79
Preston
1912
5:>:2
1-
48
416
44000 G
Brill
27G
M Renumbered
Second
#31,
c.1919.
Second
78}
Second
79 Wason 10 1 48
400
1
42500
J
Standard
0-50
M From
Springfield,
Mass.
,or
N.Y.~
Stamford,
c.1919.
80

81
Originally
doUble-end.
Second
78
later
conv.to
82
-83
WHlOlB2
motors.
#80
reblt
to
Auxiliary.
Wason 1
58
456
44500
J
Standard
0-50
M From
Springfield,
Mass.
,or
N.Y.!
Stamford,
0.1919.
Originally
dOUble-end.
84 -86
C.C.~
F
.1928
12
2
,50
460·
39000} L
CC~F-TS-4054
A
Steel
cars,
equipped
with
SKF
roller
bearings,
air
87
-92
C.C.~
F.1929
12
2
,50
462
39000
operated
doors
and
treadle
rear
exits.
201
-206
Ottawa
1912
7!-7
-80
466

Brill
27G(CV)
IA
Trailers,
each
with
one
centre
door
only.
300
Ottawa
1909 F
Brill
27G
IA
Freight
and
pas
s
enger
oombine.
Rebuilt
by
C.K.R.
C .M.R.
rebuild
from
first
#8.
Reblt
in
1932
to
second
136.
MISCELLANEOUS
AND
SERVICE
CARS
Scenic
Car
Preston
1913
I
416
G
Brill
27G(CV)
Double trUCk, open
cer
equipped
with
canvas
roof.
Ordered
in
1912,
withdrawn
from
service
c.1932,
Towards end
of
its
service,
equipped
with
GE247
motors.
Motora
later
transferred
to
#15.

IQ4{,
A
Sweeper
Ottawa
KK
Single
trUCk,
single
broom

no
air
brakes.
Ordered
in
1912.
B Motor
flat
CMR
1914
LL
Brill
27G(CV)
Double
truck
flat
with
centre
cab.
Construction
authorized
in
1913.
C
Sweeper
Single
truck

no
air
brakes

originally
an
D
Sweeper
Ottawa
Auxiliary.
Single
truck

no
air
brakes.
(Single
broom)
E
Water
Preston
1914 G Bemis
45
Double trUCks
steel
car.
Ordered
new
1913.
Re-
sprinkler
built
to
2
gravel
dump
car
E,
K35G2
control.
F
VIa
ter
Preston
1914
G Bemis
4.5
Double
truck,
steel
car.
Ordered
new
1913.
sprinkler
G
Water
CMR
G
Brill
27G
Double
truck,wooden
car
,
with
front
and
rear
cabs.
sprinkler
Used
in
Sarcee
service.
Reblt
to
42
gravel
Brill
27G(CV)
dump
car
G
with
K35G2
control.
E
Sweeper
C.C.!F.1928
F Double trUCk,
locomotive-type
steel
sweeper,
nioknamed Marv
Ann.

Motor
!lat
Double
truck,
motor
flat
with
steel
frame
and
~~
Substations
single-end
cab.
Could
be
rebuild
of
F.
CMR
Double
truck,
portable
eleotric
Sub-stations.
~ O
(f)
!
-I
~
–1
0
fTl
l
o
z
~
.
__
,.
11
.9W
–n
fTl
I
.-A..J

~
~
__
~
_n
_ •
———

—-



4.
,,

——

—–
——
—1
» »
o
Z~
»
rrl
=rJ (j)
Soe.
.H
II
CJOJC
II),.
S,).
lh
He:Jlor

S;r
;IO~;1r..e

S.;dlfl)d.
-w

St~
rrmlr
S=h

Pu:ner-oo

!-I.eafe-
RoJ

Ro:!
V
tn:
ib.
Cir
WG
.YItC..WGurd
SIDE ELEVATION AND FLOOR PLAN
0 }> 2 }> 0 }> 2 0 }> ::0 {10 Tl 0 c 2 0
I~
0 ?
r :s: —j rn !=l :s: 0 2 —j ::0 rn }> r
Lot No.
769
Above: No.
84,
one
of
Calgary
Municipal
Ry
1
s modern
steel
cars,
built
in
1928-1929.
(J.Meikle
and
C.C.!
F.)
Right:
The
Auxiliary,
switch­
ing
a t
the
CMR
yards,
in
Jan­
uary,
19.51.
(A.
Clegg)
r­w
-::::.-
~
Montreal
Works
~
Page 196 Canadian Rail
R a i I lin g 0
__ F. w. Chapman.
Continued from Page 106,
Issue No.167 -June, 1965.
There is a certain amount of uncertainty among younger fans as
to the proper terms for the fol10wine: II siding is a passing
track with a switch at both ends. A blind siding in one where
there is no open telegraph station. A spur is a track with one
switch and a dead-end. A wye is track off the main line shaped
like a wye, and is used for turning locomotives and rolling stock
when necessary.
The
term run around means that a train is given orders to
by-pass a preceding train owing to some delay of the by-passed
train. This does not cover the normal practice of a higher class
train, such as a p8.ssenger, passing a freight. If a man is promoted
ahead of one who is entitled to the position, a run-around is
claimed.
lhe term saw by is the method used to pass two trains when
the siding is too short to hold one of the trains. This is quite
simple and it depends on the length of the trains what time it tak~8
to complete the operation.
A shoo··fly is a temporary track built around an obstruction,
such as a bad derailment or washout.
Turn-aroundis the usual name for a train that leaves a point,
proceeds to another and returns to original point in one operation,
and with the same crew.
A Caboose-hopis a crew with their caboose beingdead-headed
to another point.
A flying-sv/itch or drop is a rather tricky little opera­
tion of putting a car or small cut of cars into a spur or siding
from behind a locomotive. This is done by gathering a good rolling
speed,cutting off the cars at the proper time, speeding up the loco
to get by the switch, then throwing the switch as the cars reach
it. This takes all the crew working in coordination. It is not
supposed to be practised, but is openly condoned, as it saves con­
siderable time.
The term open the gate, close the gate, bend the iron
means to throw the switch.
In the clear or in the hole means off the main line. The
main or high-iron refers to the main-line.
streak-of-rust means any railroad. Vlooden-axle-pike is a
line that is pretty hay-wire.
The term whistle stop stems from the use of the whistle by
the engineer on a passenger train to confirm the signal from the
conductor to stop at the next station. This is three short blasts.
A flag-stop is, of course, a small station where the train has to
be flagged to stop.
Canadian Rail
Page 197
Call-boy was the name of the young fellow that used to call
the train crews, for their runs. Flagwas the method of signalling,
it was also used to de no te the flagman. The term whistle in the
flag meant recall the flagman who had. been protecting the train.
iravel under a flag meant that a Rail was using an assumed name
for some good reason.
spot or on the spot was the taking of a rest period. Sin­
gle iron meant single track. Caboose, crummy, hack, way­
carll was the car at the rear of a freight train for the crew. They
normaIly had their own. Red-ball, hotshot, denoted fast trains
like the now extinct silk-extras that were the hottest of the IIhot­
shots. Peddler was the way-freight that delivered and picked up
cars and lcl freight. A zulu-car was a freight car for the use
of a small farmer or immigrant that was transporting his total be­
longings including livestock and caretaker. Jim Crow Car was for
Negroes. Varnish, IIcushions plush meant passenger train.
IIRattler was a freight train. Blind-baggage was a baggage-car
either blind at one or both ends. This meant no doors.
Company-bull or lldickll cinder-dick was policeman. Ring­
master was the yardmaster. Master-maniac was the master-mechan­
ic. Brass-hat, brass-collar top-brass was management. Car­
knocker or car-tink was the chap with the hammer that checked
the wheels of a train while pausing in terminals.
Home-guard was a rail that did not travel from job to job,
but stayed put in one place. Griever
ll
was a member of the Union
grievance committee. IIWhiskersII meant seniority. Brownies were
demerit marks awarded employees by management for infractions of
the rules. Rule G was the rule prohibiting the use of alcohol by
employees at all times – a considerable source of turmoil at times.
Rocking-chair meant retirement.
Decoratemeant up on top of the train to set brakes. A drag
was a slow freight train. Double the hill meant cutting the
train in two and taking it over the hill in two trips. Red-board
meant danger signal and clear board proceed. It was the custom
of engine crews to repeat to each other the colour of signals as a
safety measure. Wash-out·; was a violent stop sianal by hand or
lantern. A meetw.2.s when two or more trains passed outside of ter­
minals. I think the following excerpt from the classic poem The
gila-monster route describes a meet:

Off in the moonlit night, he saw the gleam of a big
headlight
An eastbound stock-train hummed the rail;
She was due at the switch to clear the mail.
As she drew up close, the head-end shack threw the
switch to the passing track,
The stock rolled in and off the main, And the line
was clear for the west-bound train.
When she hove in sight far up the track she was work­
ing steam wi th the brake shoes slack,
She hollered once at the whistle-post; Then she
flitted by like a frightened ghost;
He could hear the roar of the big six-wheel, And her
drivers pound on the polished steel,
And the screech of her flanges on the rail, As she
beat it West 0 er the desert trail.
Page 198
Canadian Rail
A cornfield meetwas collision between two opposing trains on
the main line, caused by a lap order,a mistake by the dispatcher,
or wrong interpretation of orders by train crews,a very rar~ occur­
rence at any time. A draw-bar meet was a near accident when two
trains met on the main but did not collide.
The term unload or hit the gri thi t the sad meant get off
the train while in motion. Pull the pin stems from the old days
of link and pin. It meant to uncouple, depart, quit the job, any
act of leaving. Join the birds meant to unload. Glim was a
lantern. Butter-fly was a message thrown from a moving train.
Grab the guts of a drag on the fly -meant to get on the
freight while it was pulling out.
The following were some of the names for a steam locomotive -­
mill loco hog pig tea-kettle head-end smokeyend: yard
goat for yard-switcher. The engineer was called hogger hoghead
eagle-eye runner throttle-jerker ballast-scorcher and other
things that wer€ a little hotter.
For firemen we have bake-head fire-boy ash-cat these are
self-explanatory. Tallow-pot for fireman stems from the old days
when tallow .as used for lubrication on the locomotives.
A lap-order was a mistake by the dispatcher in his train-or­
ders possibly causing a wreck. Smoke-orders -in the old days it
Vas the custom on fairly rare occasions for a train to smoke over
to meet another train, keeping a sharp lookout for the smoke of the
oPPosing train. This without the use of train orders or rights. A
most dangerous practice.
The brakeman was called a shack. Three man train crew is con­
ductor, head-shack or pin-head and parlour-brakeman. When an
extra man was used on a heavy tonnage train the name swing-man
covered him.
The conductor was a man of some distinction called 0. R. C.,
can, the brains captain skipper big-ox and numerous oth­
ers.
The dispatcher or D. S. was aptly named the delayer.
That most interesting individual, the telegraph-operator, was
called an op brass-pounder lightning-slinger. The term ham
that is now widely used in radio to denote an amateur operator and
his station,stemmed from the use of it to describe an inexperienced
telegraph operator. He was said to have a heavy fist, hence a
large one, like a ham. Nearly all operators used a bug for trans­
mitting. This is an instrument to take the place of the key. It is
a lot easier to send long messages with, after being mastered. It
prevented a man from getting a glass-wrist. A mill Vias the IIOp
typewri ter.
O.S. meant on train sheet. The most widely used terr.l in A­
merica today is no doubt 0. K. This originated on the railroad.
The Origin is obscure, but this sounds the likely one. A farmer re­
ceived a consignment of goods at the depot, signed for it and added
011 Koreck. This amused the agent,and he mentioned it to an agent
dOln the line. They used ita couple of times for a laugh, cu tit
down to O.K. and it soon spread over the whole rail system.
Canadian Rail Page 199
A thousand-miler was a shirt of black sateen, favoured by
boomers as it could go long distances between washes.
A flimsy was a train-order, 31s and 19s. A 19 could
be hooped up to the train crew on the fly, but a 31 had to be
signed for. lhe use of the 31 is going ou t.
Returning to the head-end for a moment we find that big­
hole, wipe the clock and dynamite meant emergency air applica­
tion of the brakes. Horse-over was to change the reverse leveri
it required quite an amount of energy. Company-notch -the engine
was said to be in this when it was at peak performance. Crack the
throttle mea.nt open easy. Ball the jack was to high-ball. A
scoop was a coal shovel. Black diamonds, real-estate was, of
course, coal. A hand-bomber was a hog fired by hand. rhe tra­
velling grunt was the travelling engineer. A nut-splitter was a
machinist.
We now come to that most colourful group, the roving frater­
nity. No other segment of America has contributed as much to lore
of our land. Poems, rhymes and stories in untold numbers originated
wi th these wanderers who roamed through Canada,Mexico and the U. S.
Contrary to popular belief,these wanderers were not all of the
same cloth. At, the bottom was the bum,he was just about what his
name implied. He did not work unless he was forced to, and had very
Ii ttle self-respect, if any. Next we find the bindle-stiff, who
would work at times and followed various harvestings. Di.ngbats
3hould cover these two categories. The Great American Hobo or
bo was the next on the totem pole. This character came from all
walks of life. He made a profession of beating his way, the lure
of the open road was in his blood. Euch of our rail lingo came
from the bo. The boomer-rail or boomer was a man of distinc­
tion, to say the least. He was a hogger, shaclt, op, con –
Inut-splitter or, in many cases, a versatile character who could
handle three or four rail jobs most efficiently. Hany of the home
guards resented the boomer; management knew their worth, and, in
many cases, hired them if they needed help. Of course, many ooom­
ers found a place or a girl to their liking, married and became
home-guards •
The term riding the rodsdates back to the days when cars had
truss rods that were open and could be easily climbed on to. Vari­
ous methods were used to ride on them but they were very dangerous
and uncomfortable. Most popular was the empty box-car or gondola –
a
loaded flat was dangerous as the load could shift.
Riding the blinds or blinding it was a fast way of getting
over the road. These were the terms used to describe the practice of
riding between the blind-baggage cars on a pasGenger train. It
was, to say the least, a most uncomfortable, dangerous and, at ti,,,es
extremely cold place to travel. Hany a novice came to grief rid­
ing the blinds.
The few times that I took to the open road, quite a few years
back, I was lucky enough, in some cases, to ride trains with oil­
burning hogs. If the crew were friendly, one could be real com­
fortable on the tender sitting with your back to the oil tank
which was heated in cold weather.
Photo: B. Biglow.
There are, probably, a few men that still roam the rails. In
most cases, however, the boys that you now see IIbeating their wayll
are just on the one trip, looking for work and short of cash.
At one time, nearly any town that was on a railroad had a IIjun­
gle. This was an area on the outskirts near the tracks where the
roving fraternity camped. lhe famous IImulligan-stew
ll
no doubt ori­
ginated here.
And now much of this has passed into history. One can no lon­
ger go down to the depot and chat with the IIboomerll ni te-trick
op. Listen to the whispering of the relays us they chatter of all
the news of the nation. The sharp clatter of the sounder as the
D. S. calls for the Opll to take a 1119
11
copy three. The through­
freight hollering at the mile-board, and as she roars by the 1I0p
hooping up the orders with all the nonchalance of an old hand.
Yes, it was a fabulous era one can,lOt forget, the song of the
wheels, the gleam of the switch-lights, the warmth from the pot­
bellied stove,the shining Pullmans in a pouring rain, and the glory
that was steam.
F. II. Chapman,
Port Alberni, B.C.
Canadian Rai 1
Continued from Page 185.
to the service, but the Champlain
has been
quickened b.Y five minutes.
The Chaleur Nos. 61-62, has becoml! a
full-time operation between Montreal
and Campbellton, while the Ocean Ltd
ha~ been re-timed eastbound to leave
Montreal two hours ahead of it. Pas­
sengers to and from Newfoundland are
still subjected to long waits at eith~
North Sydney or Truro.
In Newfoundland itself, Trains I and 2 liThe Caribou have
reverted to their
usual tri~eekly schedule, and mixed
trains 203-204 have been reduced from
daily to twice-weekly. The Bonavieta
sleeper is no longer shown as opera t­
ing.
The seasonal mixed trains in Prince
Edward Island and the eleeper train
between Levie and Edmundston will be­
gin operation, as in past years, on
December
15th. The chartered bus op­
eration between Amherst, N.S. and Char­
lottetown, P.E.I., has been continued
through the winter. The Longlac-Pt.
Arthur bus service is still shown, but
still does not connect with any C.N.R
trains. Two trips a day are now shown
for the bUB between Kamloops and Kel­
owna, B.C.
Railiners have appeared or resumed
service on the following trains: 629-
630 Campbellton-Gaspe; 641-644 Toronto
North Bay; 605-606 Prince George-Pr.
Rupert (tri-weekly).
Page 201
NORTHERN ALBERTA RYS.
The Northern Alberta Railways I twice­
weekly passenger trains now start from
Dunvegan Yards,
instead of the CN sta­
tion in Edmonton. Nos. 1 and Z have
become day
tra ins, but Nos. 7 & 8 re­
main as overnight services.
The Central Vermont Railway accounts
for the only passenger train actually
discontinued in tbe current issue of
the CN timetable. This was Nos.33 and
34-44, a local between St.Albans and
White
River Jct., Vt., called the V~
monter and one of the last of the old
time milk trains in operation. Ser­
vice is still provided by two other
trains each way.
~(?a4«
STEAMSHIP SERVICES
More stringent fire regulations have
been adopted
for pa~senger -carrying
inland steamships in Canada, and Can­
adian Pacific has announced that its
Great Lakes Steamships Assiniboia &
Keewatin will be withdrawn from pas­
senger service at the close of this
season. The Assiniboia will con­
tinue in freight service, while the
coal burning Keewatin will probably
be disposed of. This means that the
connecting trains 303 and 304 will not
be required next Rummer. Both vessels
were Clyde-built in 1907.
The transfer of all exhibits in the FS (Italian State Rys.) Rail­
way Museum in Rome to the Leonardo de Vinci Museum in Milan is to be
undertaken shortly. The FS Museum was opened in the basement of
the new Rome Termini station about 1.5 years ago, but the site 1s now
full and room for needed expansion is not available. The Milan Mu­
seum will be able to find room under cover for the eXhibits, whioh
include a full-size model of the Bayard, the first Italian 1000-
motive (2-2-2), built in England in 1839. and about two dozen other
types representative of FS steam power during the past seventy years.
The Rome Museum also has a fine oollection of old railway signals, &
a number of interesting model railway layouts. Agreement has been
reaohed between the two Museums for the orderly transfer of exhibit~
Page 202 Canadian Rail
Notes and News
by Ferro
• Canadlan National Ral1ways has ordered thlrty diesel-eleotrio
locomotives at a cost of $8.5 million. This is CNs first large
diesel purchase since 1960. Ten of the locomotives will be 3000-
horsepower General Motors Diesel units; the other twenty will be
2400-horsepower Montreal Locomotive Works units. The General
Motors units will be the most powerful in the CN fleet.
• Both major railways have augmented their diesel roster with leased
U.S. units. CN has leased 30 units from three U.S. roads and will
use all of them for hauling grain from Winnipeg to the Lakehead.
C.P. has leased at least 20 units, making a total of at least fifty
U.S. units helping speed grain to Russla. CN has also pressed into
service branch line locomotives which are normally used only five
days a week. Some of these units are now used on the other two
days to haul grain into Winnipeg.
• CN has awarded three contracts for 900 freight cars valued at
$13,500,000. On order from International Equipment Company of
Montreal are 200, 50-ton steel flat cars 62 feet long, which
will be used for container traffic. Vancouver Iron and Engineering
Works Ltd., will build 400 piggyback flat cars, 62 feet long.
Three hundred heated and insulated steel box cars have been ordered
from National Steel Car Corporation, Hamilton. These 70-ton-capacity
cars will be 50 6 long. Deliveries will occur during the firs!:.
half of 1966.
• Headlights reports The Budd Company has revealed that it has
recently submitted a proposal for 24 turbine powered cars to be
operated over the existing trackage of a major railroad. Unoffic­
ially this company is understood to be the very progressive Canadian
National Railways, which is searching for high-speed trains suitable
for service on it.s Montreal-~uebec, Montreal-Ottawa, and Montreal­
Toronto routes.
• Speakin§ of high-speed trains, 1ts been noted that although CNs Rap1do
1s the fastest train on the continent, it is Canadian
Pacific that provides the fastest daily service between Montreal
and Toronto.
• The Rapido inspired the Port Arthur News Chron1cle to observe
that one Will cover the 335 miles in four hours, 59 minutes, an
average speed of 67 miles an hour. It is easy to understand the
hurry to get from Toronto to Montreal, but Whats the rush in the
other direction?
• CN is increasing its passenger sales outlets across Canada through
arrangements with local travel agents. The marketing plan started
November 1 on an experimental basis in the larger centres. It
will be expanded gradually over the next two years with continu­
ation beyond that period depending upon the results obtained.
Under the arrangement, rail travellers will be able to obtain
CN transportation, parlour and sleeping car tickets directly from
conveniently located travel agents, at no extra cost.
Canadian Rail Page 203
• Effective with the change-of-time , prepayment of commuter fares
was introduced during the morning orush hours at Ama Baie and at
Roxboro. Althcrugh a similar system is needed at St. Lambert, the
running time of the train was increased five minutes, presumably
to allow conductors time to oollect fares between St. Lambert and
Central Station.
• Three stations may be knocked out of plans for the Ontario Govern­
ment subsidized commuter service. The move would be aimed at
increasing speed and frequency of service. The stations facing
elimination are Lome Park, Dixie Road, and Lakeview. This would
reduce the number of stops from 14 to 11, and cut running time by
ten minutes.
• A #10,750,000 ferry is being built at the Davie Shipbuilding dry­
dock in Lauzon, Quebec, for CN. The ferry will go into service in
the Tall o~ 1967, between North Sydney, N.S., and Port aux Basques,
Newfoundland. It will carry 12 trailer trucks and 39 standard
gauge railway cars on five tracks, at a speed of 18 knots. Trans­
shipment from the standard gauge cars to narrow gauge cars will
occur at Port-aux-Basques. Presently, transhipment must be made from
railway car to ship, then back to railway car on yonder shore.
• The Great Lakes saw the last of CPR passenger steamship service
with the olose of this years season. Both the Assiniboia and
the Keewatin would have to be extensively modified to bring them
within new regulations governing passenger ships on inland waters.
Both vessels were built in 1901. The Assiniboia will continue in
freight service.
• The city of Dorval has completed construotion of a roadway linking
the Dorval traffic circle with Victoria Avenue, Lachine. The new
road, known as Bouchard Boulevard uses the former CN mainline,
abandoned in 1961.
• Canadian Pacific will spend three million dollars in the next two
years to expand its yards in Coquitlam, a suburb of Vancouver.
The major portion is for an assembly-type boxcar repair area to
replace present shops in downtown Vancouver.
• British-built locomotives are being delivered to an American rail­
way. Ten high-horsepower diesel-electric locomotives, ordered
towards the end of last year, are now being delivered by the Clayton
Equipment Company of England to the Ferrocarriles Nacionales de
Cuba. The Co -Cos are similar in many respects to British Rails
2150 h.p. Type 4 diesel-electrics.
(Photo by Clayton
—=—-~—–
Priced Out Of Business?
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
Us probably cheaper now to haul empty f1atoars to and fro than it is to hire a good union man to uncouple them!
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