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Canadian Rail 165 1965

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Canadian Rail 165 1965

Number 165 / April 1965
TWILIGHT OVER OTIAWA
The sun was sinking beyond the Parliament Buildings
as this evening view of Ottawa Union Station was
recorded in 1940. Now, twenty-five years later,
twilight is overtaking the venerable building itself
and in less than two years the last consist will be
pulling out of the spacious trainshed.
RAILWA
Y S
of
OTTAWA
Jon
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SrN.
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/460
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,
Ra,j Iways
In
OTTAWA
today
-Douglas E. stoltz.
As part of the National Capi­
tal Plan, the rail lines in and a­
round the City of ottawa are at
present undergoing a complete re­
arrangement which will change in
almost every respect the pattern of
rail operation of the past half­
century. The most noteworthy single
change is the relocation of the
Union Station from dOVin town to a
point two miles farther out. In
addition, all yard facilities and
all railway rights-of-way in the
downtown area, lIi th the single ex­
ception of the CP Prescott Subdivi­
sion, will have been removed by
1967.
The problem of the relocation
of railways from the central parts
of the Capital is a longstanding
one dating back to 1915. fhe Holt
Report at that time stated: We
are of the firm opinion that the
pivot, on which hinges the success
or failure in carrying out any com­
prehensive plau, lies in the proper
solution of the problem of steam
railway transportation. In his
Report on the Plan for the National
Capital in 1950, Jacques Greber
strongly recommended the removal
from ottawa and Hull of eleven in­
dividual railway lines which divi­
ded the urban areas and obstructed
traffic.
Actual Iorl~ started in 1951.
The first line to be abandoned was
CNs Renfrew Subdivision (formerly
Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound) be­
tween Hepean and Otta;;la (Chaudiere
Jct.), I!hich had been merely a dup­
lication of the Beachburg Subdivi­
sion. With the completion of the
CNs WalJuey Line between Hawthorne
and Nass and the opening of the
V!alkley Yards in 1955, the railway
was able to discontinue its down­
town
freight yard operations in the
Pretoria Bridge area. Wi thin the
last few years the remaining track­
age between Chaudiere Jct. and
Riverside-Deep Cut has been twten
up and the roadbed is now buried
under the Queensway. The remains
of the old CN Roundhouse facilities
at Deep Cut have been demolished
during the past year, although the
turntable is still there. The CNs
only access to its Chaudiere Branch
is now over the CP Prescott Subdivi­
sion betvleen Chau di ere Jct. and
Ellwood, and several CN trains may
be seen on this line each day.
The Union Station was buil t in
1909 on the site of the terminal of
the former Canada Atlantic Railway,
by then absorbed into the Grand
Trunk. Eventually all passenger
trains in and ou t 0 f Ot taVia c arne to
use the station, as they still do
today. In less than two years from
no! the last consist will be pulling
ou t of the trainshed, an:, soon after
one of Ottawas important landmarks
of the past fifty years will disap­
pear from the landscape.
lhe stations slli tching is
hancUE;d by Canadian Hational, and
th;:-,t Companys timetable gover.ls
the jOint track to Deep Cut. This
Page 52
Hull Electric
10
crosses the
Royal
Alexandra
Bridge
between Ottawa
and Hull early
in 1942. fi
Canadian Rail
C.N. 5289
leaves
Ottawa Union
wi th regular
Saturday
Special
to Montreal,
23/ 8/41-
Photograph
taken from tre
Laurier Ave.
Bridge.
C.P. 29
enters
Union Sta tion
from
Royal Alexan­
dra Bridge to
pick up train
for
Waltham, Q.ue,
19/10/40.
Canadian Rail
joint sA~tinn is Rtill operatQd by
the-manual–block -system.-Al-l–o·t-her
CN main line trackage in ottawa and
vicini ty is crc. .ihe Canadian Pac­
i fic track from Ottawa to Ottawa
Viest via Hull is operated by the
electric staff block system. All
tr6.cks of both railways from Hurd­
man through to Hull w:Gl be removed
along wi th the station.
At Hurdman, near the site of
the new station, one finds a fasci­
nating spaghetti of trackage, all
eoon to disappear, and the ancient
CP interlocking tower, whose days
are likewise numbered. Here the
atmos~here of the railroad of yes­
terday is preserved remarkably
well for a junction of such import­
ance. Host of the signals and
swi tches are manually operated from
the tower. l.wo years from noVl, all
that Vlill remain is the CN Beachburg
Subdivision, which will be carried
over to the western end of the new
station by a new embankment which
is already nearly completed. The
roadbed of the station, adjacent
coachyard,and eastern access tracks
is already being laid with ties.
Construction of the station building
itself has not yet begun, but it is
hoped to have the building ready by
the summer of 1966.
rhe station has been designed
by John B. Parkin Associates, with
the cooperation of Canadian National
and Canadjan Pacific. It will be
part of a raj.l transportation centre
which will include two merchandise
terminals, a new telecommunications
building, and power and maintenance
buildings. There will be ready ac­
cess to the st~tion from all parts
of the National Capital Region via
the Al ta Vista interchange and the
Queensway. To provide a direct
route to dOI7DtoVJll and the Parliament
buildings, a new road is proposed
from the Queensway along the east
side of the Rideau Canal, where the
railway tracks leading to Union
Station are now located.
Sir.1ilar accommodation to that
at the existing station will be
provided in a structure 300 feet
long and 140 feet wide wi th a con-
Page 53
oouroe 35 feet high. Two wings,
each-r45-feet bY~~5 feet on either
side of the main concourse will in­
clude accommodation for administra­
tive offices, a restaurant, a bagg­
age room, crew space, etc. A large
canopy will extend over the entrance
to give protection to pa~sengers
arriving and departing by car or
bus. Passenger platforms will also
be protected by canopies and Vlill
be reached by a tunnel under the
tracks.
Supported on columns, the main
roof structure will be constructed
of welded steel trusses Vii th memb­
ers fabricated in box form. The
lower wings on each side will be
faced ~Ii th reinforced concrete. The
end walls of the concourse and the
spaces between the low wings and
the concourse roof will be enclosed
in glass. The estimated cost of
the building and other structures in
the station area is $6.5 million,
of which the station itself will
account for some t;2. million.
rhe CN s Hurdman Line from
Hurdman to a point across the Rid­
eau River, a distance of 0.7 miles,
will soon be removed. It crosses
the bridge formerly used by Cana.dian
Northern trains between Ottawa and
Hawkesbury. It is the last exist­
ing portion of the Canadian Northern
line west 0 f Hal·,kesbury, abandoned
in 1939. Its few odd industries
are served by a daily local.
The CPs Sussex St. Subdivision
between Hurdman and Sussex St. (3.1
miles) is also slated for abandon­
ment. It was this line over which
Ottawas first railway, the Bytovm
and Prescott, first gained entrance
to t.he city. Track has already been
lifted beyond Beechwood Ave., but
the P.ideau River bridge is still up.
Back on Christmas Day of 1854 when
the first passenger train arrived,
the bridge had not yet been comple­
ted. The passengers were ferried
to the other side of the river and
had to walk from there to the sta­
tion on Sussex St. The former ter­
minal area is now obscured by the
construction of approaches to a new
highway bridge across the Ottav/a

Canadian Rail
River. For many years the line had
carr:i.ed fre~.ght only. rhe indust­
ries along the remaining portion
are still served daily. South of
Hurdman the Sussex st. Subdivision
has been abandoned as far us Smyth,
where a connection was made a few
years ago with CNs Beachburg Sub­
division.
Construction of the new Cana­
dian Pacific freight yard adjacent
to CNs Ilulkley Yard is no VI under
way. This will replace the Broad
st. Yards at ottawa ~est which,
with CNs Chaudiere Branch, serve
ottawas Illost blighted industrial
area (soon to become parkland).
ottawa ~iest Roundhouse has not been
torn dovm yet. It is apparently
being used as a garage for CP
trucks. However, two of its stalls
are occupied by steam locomotives,
CP 4-6-0 No. 926 and CN 4-8-Lf No.
6200 (Canadian Rdl
1
Sept. 64,
pages 198, 201). CPs Carleton
Place Subdivision between ottawa
West and Bells Corners will be ab­
andoned as soon as a connection has
been effected with CNs Beachburg
Subdivision at Bells Corners.
Work on depressing the CP Pres­
cott Subdivision from Carleton Uni­
versity to Somerset st. (near ottaVia
west) is progressing on schedule.
Union Station -Ottawa.
Page 55
Part 1 of this project is the con­
struction of a tunnel under the
Rideau Canal and Colonel By Drive
a t Dows Lake and the buil eli ng 0 f
an open cu t on either side of the
tunnel. ihis work will be complet­
ed this year, and the present swing
bridge will be removed. Part 2 is
the construction of the depressed
line under Carling Ave. to the
QU eensway, to be completed in 1966.
Part 3 extends from the ~eensway
to Somerset St. Since the rail line
will be depressed, all through
streets will be carried over the
tracks.
CPs Maniwaki Subdivision(for­
mer Gatineau Valley Ry.) which now
passes under the Lachute Subdivi­
sion (original CP transcontinental
line) will soon be joined directly
to it and as a result about a mile
of track in Hull will be lifted. A
new spur line will connect the Can­
ada Cement Plant to the Haniwaki
Subdivision. The CP line from ott­
awa Union to Hull via the Royal Al­
exandra Bridge (opened 1901) will
be disappearing along with Union
Station, and thus passenger trains
Iill once again operate between ot­
tawa West and Ellwood over the
Prescott Subdivision (providing CP
Hontreal-Ottawa North Shore trains
continue to operate). No changes
Union Station has eight tracks, of which the farthest two
have access to Royal Alexandra Bridge, used by CP trains &
engines. Parking lot adjacent to Station used to be yar~
E.B.Eddy plants across Ottawa River have own private rail­
way.
C.P. -Ottawa West roundhouse.
Ottawa West roundhouse, and to its left the station. The
line at left heads towards Prinoe of Wales Bridge (1880) ,
while Royal Alexandra Bridge oan be seen in the distance • .
Lines entering photo at right are CP Prescott Sub. and C.N
Chaudiere Sub, which skirts CP yards and circles around Le
Breton Flats industrial area. Plans oall for joining the
Prescott Sub. to bridge and removal of all other tracks.
Aerial photos courtesy of National Capital Commission,
Information & Historioal Division.
Page 56
are foreseen for the CP ~ulthahl
Subdivision (forDer Pontiac Pacific
Junction ~ailw~y).
The overall cost of the pro­
gr&mme I:ill be in the vicinity of
~}28. T~illion, including the new
station, new track&ge, freight
structures, signal aild telecoinmuni­
cations installations, and the coo-
Canadian Rai 1
structionof the tun.wl Gild open cut
from Carleton Uni versi ty to Somerset
St. As a result about 70 level
crossings and SOl.~e ::5 miles of
trucks will have di so.ppeared. i.he
l&nd thus released, amounting to
a;)l)roxLlately 450 acres, lIill lle
usee. for parkwc.ys, building sites,
parks, &no other planned land uses.
C.N. -Former roundhouse and Coachyard.
Double track through centre of photo is CN Alexandria Sub.
and the line to its right is CP M&O Sub. Where they meet
is Deep Cut and beyond it is the coachyard and Union St­
ation. All other tracks are now gone: N.Y.C. installa­
tions on right, CN on left. One year ago the eN wye area
looked almost the same as in this photo -now an expre~y
interchange is under construction here.
Reprint from THE MIT,LER (Vol 29 No.1)
published by o gil vie Flour Mills Company
To the real railroad enthusiast, a lot of
the fun went out of the iroll horse with
the retirement of steam locomotives. There
is something impersonal and characterless
about the modern diesel engine, and it is
hard to love an efficient machine tha t
worksat the push of a button. But a steam
engine-ah. there was a personality! It
took skill and coaxing to put a fine plume
of
smoke in her hat and to bring out ti1e
best in the hissing, impatient, powerful
creature that personified ENGINE to
small
boys the world over.
This, at least, seems to be the feeling of
a lot of people who mourn the passing of
the steam locomotive. One such puff-puff
buff is
Dave Scott of Head Office, who
aptly enough works for the Traffic De­
partment. Last fall, along with over 400
other enthusiasts from points as wide­
spread as California and London, Eng­
land, Dave took part in a nostalgic trip
into yesterday. covering some of Quebecs
oldest rail lines in a train pulled by a
genuine steam locomotive. But though the
memories may be old, the equipment these
types take along is up-to-the-minute. A
note in
the leaAet printed for the occasion
by the Canadian Railroad Historical As­
sociation
pointed out that the baggage car
was equipped with four doors, and has
outlets for tape recorders. Further on,
the leaAet refers to movie runs, during
which budding Cecil B. deMilles may de­
train and photograph the train-which has
conveniently backed up some distance­
puffing through suitably photogenic scen­
ery.
And so
the sights and sounds of the past
are recorded for the future. Perhaps the
changing sounds are as symbolic of pro­
gress as the smokeless smokestacks and
functional designs. For the strident and
intolerant blare of a diesels horn has 1101le
of the invitation to excitement in the
haunting whistle of a steam locomotive
puffing
majestically through the quiet of
the night.
elf-ISSI
~ M t -~ •
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
WING
SNOWPLOW
MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT
MOHTREAL
HEAVY
DUTY
toIO
.
OF
I
NUMBERS
pLO
….
2
55401&55402
.
r
.,….
..
-1
i
I
1
I
T1
fl–I
~……
~·o,,
/
~
.C.-
..
18
:
0-
T9yCKCEIClE!t
i-
5
.
0-
9:,i .
I-&
..
I?i
1——–;…..33..a!i
PULL,
F
..
CEOFCOUPLERS
&ACK
OF[HDSlLL.
The
diagram
reproduced
this
month,
shows
the
vital
statistics
of
a
pair
of
Canadian
Nations
Heavy
Duty
snowploughs.
The two
units,
constructed
in
1935
by
the
National
Steel
Car
Company
of
Hamilton,
Ontario,
weigh
almost
39
tons
apiece.l5540l

77800#
:
55402-77500~
They
are
the
heaviest
pieces
of
snow-fighting
equipment
on
the
Sys­
tem
with
the
exception
of
the
Rotaries
and
the
all-steel
ice-d~g
flangers
built
in
the
1948-56
period
by
the
Russell
Co.
which weigh
in
the
vicinity
of
86000
lbs.
I
…….
.
~
RAil
..
I
A I berta to get
New Railway.
Irf 1.0 fu.~
,-()
Canadian Rail I Page 59
A new railway line, to be built and operated by the Canadian National
Railways, and paid for initially by the Government of the Province of
Alberta, is now under construction.
Surveyors have moved into the Hinton, Alta., area to layout the pre­
cise route of the line, which will run roughl.y 100 miles north from
the C.N. transcontinental line west of Hinton to tap rich coal, gyp­
sum and forest resources.
The new Western Resource Railway likely will start from Solomon, Al­
berta, and head towards the Grande Prairie area, where a connection
could be made with the Northern Alberta Railways (which were them­
selves once controlled by the Province). The new line, pushing into
an almost uninhabited area of rolling bush country, will be ownedby a
new Alberta Crown Corporation. C.N. will operate the railway on
a lease-purchase basis, eventually becoming the outright owners a: the
line.
-IIIQUIT-
M.D. Leduc.
The banquet meeting, celebrating the thirty-third anniversary
of the Canadian Railroad Historical Assooiation was held in LaSalle
Canadienne of Windsor Station in Montreal, on March lOth. Over
fifty guests attended the annual event, and enjoyed a succulent
roast beef dinner, satisfying the appetite of all.
The host and master of ceremonies was our President, Dr. R.V.~
Nicholls, who proposed the toast to Her Majesty; the Q.ueen. Mr.A.
S. Walbridge gave a report ooncerning the progress of the museum
during the past year.
lhe guest speaker, Dr. Robert F. Legget, Director of the Divi­
sion of Buildings and Engineering, National Hesearch Gounc~l, was
introduced by Dr.Nicholls. Dr. Leggets topio was RAILWAY HISTORY.
He related anecdotes of his first impressions of Canada from a
train and summarized the vast changes in railroading that have taken
place since that time.
(Continued on Page 60)
–~~~
AeCe.81P1f_
The following is a summary of diesel locomotives retired by the Can­
adian National Railways during the year 1964.
(Compiled by The Duke)
Class Road Nos. Builder Year Blt. Horsepower
ER-6a
MR-18d
MR-18g
GR-17h
GR-17m
MS-7a
MS-7b

MS-7c

II
CFA-16b
II

37
3725 3889 4531 4582 8452 8462 8465 8466 8479 8487 8488 8489 8491 8494 8495 9324 9326 9340
G.E.
MLW.
MLW.
G.M. G.M.
MLW.
MLW.
II

MLW.
I
II

II
CLe.

1950 1958 1960 1957 1957 1951 1953
II
II

1954

1952-3

600 1800 1800 1750 1750 660 660

660
II

1600

Scrapped

To B-2
To B-3
To B-4
To B-ll
To B-9
To B-5
To B-7
To B-8
To B-6
To B-12
To B-10
Scrapped

The following diesel units were acquired by the C.N. in 1964:
Booster
(0)
MR-24a GR-25a B-1
to
B-10 incl.
3200-3201 4000-4001
CNR.
MLW.
G.M.
1964 1964 1964 -Max.40 mph. 2400 Max.75 mph. 2500
Max.7l mph.
(@) These Booster units, used for switching, were re-built from
MLW yard switchers.
~C~n~l~u~aEf;om Page 59) ~~~~~
Dr.Legget told of various small railways
in different provinces, some of which he discovered only recently
by accident. One in particular was only a couple of miles long and
acted as a portage. He mentioned how these small lines aided in
the expansion of our country, and pointed out that we, as amateur
railway historians, should help preserve details of the rapid ohan­
ges taking place in railroading in Canada. Because of our interest
in history, Dr. Legget stressed that we should spend some of our
time doing historical research on both the abandoned and the pre­
sently operating lines in the country. He also said that we have a
great opportunity for informing fellow railway historians and pre­
serving the inf.orma tion through the pages of ICanadian Raill.
Our sincere appreciation to Dr.Legget for his informative talk
was expressed by Mr.Omer Lavallee. Our secretary, Mr. John Collins
then proposed a toast to the Canadian Railroad Historical Associa­
tion thus concluding a most interesting Birthday Party Meeting
and Banquet.
New diesel-electric units, built by the Montreal Locomotive Works
for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have been leased by the C.N.
for a period of eight weeks. They are to be operated by the C.N.
in the Jasper-Prince Rupert service. The National System accepted
delivery of the first two units, PGE 619 and 620 (M.L.W. 84830 and
84831 respectively) on March 4, and worked them west from Montreal
the following day. Shovm below are photos of the new units, being
Also being leased by
the Canadian National
are a pair of General
Motors units construct­
ed by E.M.D. for the A­
laska Railroad. They
carry road numbers 2502
serviced at CN Montreal
Yard. Note differing
lettering and paint sch­
eme on otherwise iden­
tical units.
(Photos: Barry Biglow.)
and 2503, and are being operQted for a short time in freight ser­
vice between Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the Pacific Coast.
Recent Canadian Pacific motive power chanBes –­
renumberings, retirements, and purchases —-­
will be reported as soon as data available, most
likely in the next issue of Canadian Rail.
Page 62 Canadian Rail
MIRE TO MUSEUM WITH MONEY AND MEN
by F. Angus
Nineteen sixty-four was the most successful year so far
in the Museums history. During the year, members laid nearly 2500
feet of track, including five switches, so that in spite of the
arrival of thirty pieces of equipment with a total length of some
1500 feet, the tracklaying kept ahead of equipment arrivals. Also
in 1964, a permanent bridge was erected, thus providing a l500-foot
access road entirely over museum property. Last year will also be
remembered for the distinctive symbol adopted for the museum. It
was also the year interested non-members were permitted to view the
museum site upon payment of an entrance fee.
During the year, land was graded in preparation for the
second trainshed building, and for the track leading to it and to
the turntable. In places the ground level was lowered as much as
three feet and the resulting earth used to fill and make use of
otherwise unusable land. This work was done by contractors while
the members concentrated on tracklaying. About 1400 feet of stor­
age track was laid and work was also done on the track which will
connect with the new building. The old tail track was realigned
and a new track was built to the site of the turntable pit. The
turntable itself was brought by the C.P.R. from St. Lin, Q.ue., and
was unloaded last October. It will be installed during 1965. Co­
incidentally, the turntable arrived in the same train as engine No.
29, the last steam engine turned on it (November 6, 1960).
During the summer, it became clear that we would have to
take all remaining CN and CF locomotives before another winter.
Nine CN engines came on two different days, and while four were
placed on the property, it was decided to leave five engines on the
Candiac Spur so that some traok would be clear for switching and
moving supplies. The CF engines were also brought over, but all
these were placed inside our gate. CF class T-l, No. 5935, the
Selkirk and largest of all, was moved in on November 10, completing
delivery of all the main line steam locomotives slated for the
Museum. However, two more items were yet to come from CN, bringing
the total rolling stock at Delson to eighty. These were diesel­
electric car 15824 and street car 15702, the latter used since 1924
at Neebing hUmp yard, Fort William. Received with the 15702 was a
l50-amp. 600-volt motor-generator set, all control equipment, poles
and 3500 feet of trolley wire, in short a do-it-yourself trolley
system kit. This will permit electric operation at the museum
by 1966, if not 1965. Headquarters for the work crew was transfer­
red to 15702 from S&L No.4 and the formers stove provides comfort
in temperatures of minus 15 outside.
It had been hoped to start on the footings of the second
large building but construction has been deferred until the Spring
of 1965. The new building will be about the same size as the exis­
ting one (80×330), but will contain six tracks, giving a total
C a na d ian R ail Page 63
length of 1980 feet. The total track under cover in both buildings
will be 3700 feet by the end of 1965 if present plans are carried
out. (This apparently includes temporary track squeezed betvleen
the four permanent tracks in the existing building.–WP) EVEN THIS
IIILL NOT BE ENOUGH FOR ALL EQUIPMENT and it is planned to build a
carbarn for streetcars and electric railway equipment in the
future,
In December, work began on a section house. This struct­
ure will accommodate an office as well as tracks for section cars,
lorries, and tracklaying equipment, and will also provide space for
tools. This work has continued in the new year in spite of temper­
atures that one day went to 17 below O. Admittedly little work was
done THAT day. During the year it is also proposed to build a
substation building to house the Neebing motor-generator and assoc­
iated equipment. The building projects for 1965 have already made a
good start with the 33-mile move, between January 11 and 14, of
Barrington station to the Museum. While this is the newest
building so far as Delson is concerned, it is actually, of course,
the oldest, having been built about 1880.
The new bridge, erected in June, and consequent permanent
access road has already been described in Canadian Rail. While the
museum was not officially open in 1964, interested persons were
permitted to visit on Sunday afternoons. Donations were Accept­
ed from these people and about $300 was realized. It is planned
to continue this scheme on an expanded scale in 1965. A committee
has been set up to arrange the display of exhibits and to publicize
the project when it is formally opened. Toward this end, a symbol
consisting of a styalized steam locomotive was adopted for use on
signs, notices and other items concerning the museum.
With the official opening day drawing ever closer, the
need for more volunteers increases. Many different kinds of talent
are needed, not only for basic railroad work such as tracklaying,
but in restoration of equipment, construction of buildings, and for
tasks such as arranging exhibits, and acting as guides to show vis­
itors around the property. Constructive suggestions are also wel­
come! The second building fund has been started and this is anoth­
er area where contributions will be useful and much appreciated.
Although 1964 was a record year, 1965, with the active
support of the membership, can break all previous records. Lets
all do our part to hasten the day when we can point with pride to
a comprehensive and attractive panorama of Canadas railway herit­
age and say, I did more than talk of my interest in railways; I
pitched in to create this enduring testimony of my interest a
testimony which will outlive my words and will inspire future gen­
erations to discover the fascination that is railroading.
A four-year-old friend of ours has asked how C.N. expects to
get passengers to travel in their Dome cars. The photo on
the current timetable cover (which is her only contact with
the Soeneramic cars so far) shows no doors on the Dome car-­
and not even a door in sight on the adjacent standard cars!!
Page 64 Canadian Rai 1
Notes and News
by LePhagg
~ CN is introducing a new type of road-rail container, known as
RAILTAINERS, to speed the movement of express freight between the
Maritimes and Montreal. The 20-foot-long aluminum containers, which
are insulated and have built-in heating units, will be used between
Montreal, Rimouski, Mont Joli, Bathurst, Newcastle, and Moncton.
The big advantage of the containers is that they can be transferred
easily between train and truck, eliminating unnecessary handling of
shipments and speeding up pickup and delivery.
~ CN has ordered 220 units of freight equipment valued at 3.5 million
dollars. The order is comprised of 145 70-ton wood chip cars for
service in British Columbia, 25 bi-level carriers for movement of
trucks, and 50 tri-level automobile rack cars.
~ CP has announced that dining car service on the Dominion between
Sudbur~, Ontario and Vancouver has been discontinued for the off­
season, i.e., from September 7 to June 23. The railway pointed out
that ample opportunity is provided for passengers to obtain food at
stations en route.
~ The Board of Transport Commissioners ordered CP to reinstate train
service between Montreal and Megantic effective March 26. CP
removed passenger trains 202 and 203 from the l75-mile run last
~ctober 25. The Board deCided that a public hearing should be held
on the discontinuance but no date has been set.
~ To cope with greatly increased passenger bUSiness, the Canadian Nat­
ional has purchased thirty-four second hand sleeping cars and leased
ten others units. The National System has acquired 20 sleepers
(10 Roomettes,6 D.B.R.) from the New York Central, a dozen (14 Rmette,
4 D.B.R.) from the Frisco, and two (6 Sec, 6 Rmette, 4 D.B.R.) from
the Bangor & Aroostook. Leased are four (6 – 6 -4) from the B&M
and six (12 -4) from the Wabash. The purchase of additional
R.D.C. units is also being considered.
~ Edmundston, N.B.s Chamber of Commerce has a novel major project for
1965 –to get CN to provide better passenger service between their
city and Montreal. However, instead of only trying to talk the
railway into a better service, the Chambers members are to drum up
enough business that the railway will be glad to put on a first
class train. Nobody will be more delighted than CN if the Edmund­
ston chambers experiment works out well. The Edmundston approach
is refreshing and their campaign deserves to succeed.
~ The Transport Department announced recently that moving sidewalks
will be installed in Montreal Airport to convey passengers to
airplane loading gates. Would the taxpayers like to also foot the
bill to install similar amenities in Canadas railway stations?
Canadian Rai 1 Page 65
~ Late last November, Mr.Paul Tomkowicz passed away at the age of 75
years, and was laid to rest in Winnipeg with few outside his circle
of family and friends aware of his death. Mr.Tomkowicz was the
star of the movie Paul Tomkowicz, Street Railway Switchman, made
in Winnipeg by the National Film Board in 1953. The film, describing
the activities of the track maintenance workers of Winnipeg Electric
Railway, was one of the finest documentaries of all times, and won
major awards including the International Film Festival in Edinburgh,
Scotland.
~ Norfolk and western can now be considered as aCanadian railway.
The N.& W. System recently took over the Wabash Railroad, which ran
through southern Ontario on rails operated jointly with the Canadian
National Railways. It also absorbed the Nickle Plate, joint owners
of the D.& T.S.L. with the Grand Trunk western HR.
* After some months of indecision, plans for the Northumberland Strait
Causeway are now being prepared on the basis that Canadian National
will be operating a railway system in Prince ~dward Island for some
years to come. At one pOint, it was planned to construct the PEl
link without rail facilities.
~ Some ten thousand vlinnipeggers turned out recently to view an assort­
ment of railway passenger cars at Winnipegs CNR Station. According
to reports from the Manitoba capital, CNR officials were surprised at
the attendance, especially as the temperature during the two day ex­
hibit was below the zero point.
A me invitation of Mr.Maurice Archer, CN V.P.,to the International
Union of Hailways (Office for Research and ~xperiments) to hold their
1967 meeting in Montreal has been accepted. It will be the first time
the Office has met in North America. Representatives of forty-eight
European, African and Asian railways are expected to attend.
* Progress on Place Bonaventure, atop the Canadian National tracks im­
mediately south of Central Station, Montreal, is proceeding rapidly.
~arly in the year, what was left of the Ames rlolden Building on In­
spector Street, was demolished and the ground made ready for the
extension southwards of Tracks 7 and 8 from Gentral ~tation. The
steel electrification supports were removed from the area, and the
trolley wires suspended from temporary wooden poles. Concrete abut­
ments between the tracks are now being erected and the western section
of Lagauchetiere rlridge widened over tracks 7 and 8. (No word yet
regarding the possible re-introduction of electric locomotives to
take the place of the present diesel switchers. If this is not done,
it would seem fumes will be most noxious both under and in Central
Station and Place B. Electric locomotives performed most of the
switching chores at Central Station from 1943 to about 1959.)
* According to a recent issue of the NRHS Bulletin, the C.N.-C.V.,
desirous of reviving the ailing Montreal-New York service, is looking
into the possibility of routing traffic over the Gentral Vermonts
Southern Division line to New London, Conn. The N.Y.,N.H.& H.RR. is
reported to be ready to acoept the rerouted trains at New London in­
stead of Springfield, 16ass., thus eliminating the B.& M. section 01
the through route. This would also allOW for connections to Boston
at either Palmer (via B&A) or New London (via New Haven).
Page 66 / Canadian Rai 1
Interesting
IT EMS
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Cana dia n Ra i 1 Page 67
Addi tional in forma tion concerning Ken t Northern Ry. #2 pi ctured
on Page 46 -March issue -has been supplied by Messrs. C. V;.
Anderson and C. Steeves. Kent Northern No.2, was built for
the Intercolonial Ry. by the Canadian Locomotive Company in 1675
–construction number 140 –and it was #19 on the I.C.R. It
weighed 35 tons, had cylinders 16×24~, 60~ drivers, and boiler
pressure of 110 Ibs. per square inch. It was purchased by
the Kent Northern as their Third #-2 in 1904.
Mr. Anderson of Sussex, N.B. 8.1so writes~ I have here, in
Sussex, a small museum and I would be pleased to have any of me
members call if or when they are in the vicinity~.
Another ~private museum, of interest to those whose hobby
is collecting model trains, is the collection assembled by GRHA
member John A. b:arkham of dindsor, Ontario. He has one of the
most comprehensive collections of model trains in Canada, and
in a cottage behind his residence exhibits some 825 locomotives
and over 1500 fars in all gauges. I,lr. r,larkham is interested in
henring from others in any part of the world who have in inte­
rest in minature railway equipment.
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Railway Trains, Ocaan Liners, Warships, sub·Marlnes
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Ives No, 25 Locomotive, Circa 1903
THE INTERNATIONAL MINIATURE RAILWAY
fIVST
GOOD FOR RETURN TRIP AND THROUGH THE SHOPS
NOT TRANSFERABLE
2261 MOY AVE WINDSOR, ONTARIO, CANADA
WITH SIDE TRIPS AND STOPOVER
John 0/, ..Markham
President
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28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21
Bussas, Aeroplanes, Graf Zepplin, Street Cars and Trolleys
Photograph of the marker beside the Trans Canada Highway
near Craigellachie, British Columbia.
(Photographed by Eric Johnson of Edmonton last
August 31st.)
Duluth Missabe and Iron Range diesels 179, 112 and 193, heading CN
train 416 (Montreal to Garneau) at E.J.Tower, on January 23, 1965.
(Photographed by Murray W. Dean, Montreal West.)
Midnight Oil
Doug Nright –Montreal Star
The hockey game must have gone into overlime-nobodys in bed yet.
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
efQ6IiJ~W 19:32 • :B~t 22 . Sid/ion :B . JUonlrt.a{ 2 . Qwe6ec • 8n,orpof(J/tJ 1941
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