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Canadian Rail 156 1964

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Canadian Rail 156 1964

c;an..adian..
)~~fin
Number 156 / June 1964
:Belf£il, June 29, 1864.
mlRECISELY one hundred years ago this month, on June 29th,
g 1864, a special passenger train on the Grand Trunk Rail-
way of Canada, carrying three hundred and fifty German
immigrants, went through an open drawbridge at the village of
Beloeil, Que., thus precipitating Canadas worst railway accident.
Ninety seven immigrants, the conductor and the locomotive fire­
man and, two days later, a curious onlooker, succumbed, carrying
the death toll up to an even one hundred.
The passengers had come from Europe on the salling vessel
Neckar, disembarked at Quebec, and were ferried to Levis
where they were loaded on the ill-fated train. which consisted of
two baggage cars, seven cars normally used for produce but tem­
porarily fitted up for passengers, a second-class coach and a
brake van. The train was pulled by the 4-4-0 locomotiv .. HAM,
No. 168 of the G. T. R .. a product of the works of D.C.Gunn at
Hamilton. Special trains had depleted the supply of engine-and
train-crew at Richmond, the intermediate divisional point between
Levis and Montreal, and the locomotive foreman persuaded Will­
iam Burney, a newly-promoted engine driver. to take the train to
Montreal, even though he had never operated a locomotive over
the section. Conductor. fireman and brakeman completed the crew.
Approaching the Richelieu River bridge between St. Hilaire
and Beloeil at about 1 :15 AM, the train failed to make a mandat­
ory stop at the east end of the bridge, provided for in the Company
rules. The engineer apparently failed to see the danger sig­
nal. indicating that the drawbridge was open, until it was too late,
and the train plunged through the opening onto a barge which was
being towed by a tugboat.
Help was dispatched immediately fro,n Montreal. and the in­
jured rushed to hospitals. Many succumbed as a result of their
wounds, but among the survivors was the luckless engineman,
Burney, who was arrested and made to stand trial at a coroners
inquest. He was found guilty of incompetence, but the railway was
sharply criticized for lack of operating or mechanical examinat­
ions, laxness in the exercise of discipline, and lack of judgment
on the part of its officers.
The unfortunate victims did not die in vain. In the aftermath
of the terrible tragedy came badly-needed discipline, regulation of
practice and operation, full and competent crews. and a host of
mechanical improvements. It is said that the Beloeil acc-
ident was one of the factors which encouraged Westinghouse to
develop and perfect his air brake. All of these developments have
combined to give modern railway travel an enviable record for
safety, proved by the fact that Canadas worst accident by far is
now one hundred years behind us.
OTTAWA, ARNPRIOR & SOUND
by Omer Lavallee
THE PRINCIPAL MOTIVATING FACTOR behind the construction of the
Canada Atlantic Railway between Ottawa and the international boundary near
East A.lbu.rgh, Vermont, in the 1880s, was the conveyance of lumber and allied
products from the valley of the Ottawa above our nations capital, to a direct
connection with the railways of the eastern United States. The Canada Atlantic
was the project of Ottawas lumber baron, John Rudolphus Booth, and its finan­
cing was principally through bonds owned by Booth and his family, rather than
by the more normal channels of equity capital. Within a short time of its Open­
ing between Ottawa and Coteau, Que., in 1883, it had established an operating
liaison with the Grand Trunk, and through passenger trains operating between
Montreal and Coteau Over the GT, and from Coteau to Ottawa on the CAR, offer­
ed a prestige service in an era when the efforts of most railways, in Canada at
least, were turned toward development rather than refinement. In the late 1880s,
this service was at least able to boast that it offered Canadas first electrically­
illuminated trains. Later, as the Nineteenth Century drew to a close, three
high-speed Baldwin-built Vauclain compound 4-4-2 type engines gave neighbour­
ing and parallel Canadian Pacific services serious competition and spirited
rivalryj one of these locomotives boasted the largest driving wheels ever pro­
vided a Canadian railway locomotive –84t- in diameter~
Once his basic services were established and operating, Booth turned his
attention westward to his extensive landholdings in the wilderness lying between
Ottawa and Georgian Bay, which lay partly in what is now Algonquin Park, and in
1888 incorporated two railway companies: the Ottawa, Arnprior & Renfrew Rail­
way Company, and the Ottawa & Parry Sound Railway Company. These charters
carried pOwers to build, respectively, from Ottawa to Renfrew, and from Ren­
frew to what is now Scotia, on the Toronto-North Bay railway. After acquiring
rights-of-way and other concomitant property necessary to construction, the
true purpose of the two companies was shown, in 1891, when they were amalgam­
ated as the Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound Railway Company.
Surveying of the route was carried on under the personal direction of the
Chief Engineer of the Canada Atlantic, Mr. George A. Mountain, and a route
chosen following the valley of the Madawaska into the interior. Construction
was begun in 1892, and in May, 1893, the first 36-mile section was opened to
traffic between the capital and Arnprior. The Ottawa Journal carried a long
and detailed account of this event:
The first passenger coach over the Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound Railway
was run between the capital and Arnprior yesterday. It was a special for
operating purposes, and on board were Mr. John R. Booth, Mr. Geo. A. Moun­
tain, chief engineer, and other officials of the new line •••••.

Considering that the road is not yet ballasted, the run was made in splen­
did style, an average of twenty-five miles an hour being made…….. The
special left the Elgin street station at 8:30 on its flight to the west. After
crossing the trestle work at Preston street, a magnificent view is presented

Page 132
Canadian Hail
to the sightseer ••••••
The first point of importance reached on the way is the Carp village, 19
miles west of Ottawa, and by the number of freight cars standing on the sid­
ing, a stranger would be apt to think the road had been in running order for
ever so long. Here everything is bustle •••••••.
Kinburn eight miles further west is next reached, and it may be stated that
these eight miles are the straightest piece of railroad line in America. (As
a statement of fact, this assertion is open to question!–OSAL) Kinburn is
a pretty little village surrounded by a very rich agricultural country, and the
evidence of its producing qualities can be seen in the grain shed erected close
to the siding, into which farmers are constantly pouring their grain for ship­
ment. At this point the bustle witnessed at the Carp is repeated only in
greater volume. As the train sped through there yesterday, 19 teams were
busy unloading their cereal binders •••••••
Galetta is the next point of importance reached. Here the Mississippi is
spanned by a magnificent steel bridge of the most modern pattern and of great
strength. The iron superstructure rests upon two massive stone abutments
and an equally massive pier in midstream. Thlt cutwater of the pier, as well
as all the masonry is built to resist not only the river currents and freshets,
but it looks strong enough to successfully resist even the hand of time itself.
Arnprior, an ambitious town of 3,000 inhabitants, was reached a few minutes
after ten oclock. This bustling little hive is overjoyed at the building of the
Parry Sound railway. for they expect and not without good and sufficient rea­
sons, that the new road will give a boom to everything…….. The chief indus­
try of the town is the great sawmills of the McLaughlin Brothers, who employ
about 700 men and have an annual output of 85,000,000 feet of lumber ………
Next week, work on the new railway bridge spanning the Madawaska will be
commenced. It will be an iron superstructure resting on stonework.
As soon as the weather permits, ballasting trains will be put on the road, and
the ballasting completed at the very earliest moment. The rails on the road
are of Sheffield manufacture, weighing 72 pounds to the yard. They are the
best rail in the market. When all the ties are laid, there will be 3,000 to the
mile, some 350 more to the mile than any railway in the Dominion. The idea
of placing additional ties is to solidify the road bed…….. As the road is to­
day, coaches glide smoothly, but when the additional ties are placed and the
ballasting completed, there will not be a jolt and the road will be capable of
bearing a speed of a mile a minute …..
Freighting on the new road is very active. This morning, the engine Nellie
Bly with J. King at the lever and J. Blythe as assistant took up ten cars of
merchandise and four empty box cars. The train was in charge of Conductor
A. 0 Boyle, with Messrs. Nicholson and Arris as brakemen ………
RIGHT (Top): lhe original roundhous e at Madawaska was a
five-stalled wooden structure, later replaced by a con­
crete structure whose walls still stand.
(Bottom): Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound No. 697 was
a
powerful Baldwin-built Vauclain Compound 2-8-0. These
engines formed the backbone of the OA&PS power pool.

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Map
of
the
tTTAWA
lRNPRIOR
&
,ARRY
IOUND
IAILWAY
COMPANY.
and
adjacent
railways.
o
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,s-
MILES
20
15

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–~
C_an_a_d_i_a_n_R_a_i_l __________ ~ _________ ~ ____ P__ag e 135,.
Following the opening to Arnprior. construction was held up while a dispute
with the Canadian Pacific was resolved before the Board of Railway COlYlmi.ss~
ioners. relating to the laying of a level crossing over the CP by the OA& PS just
to the west of the station. In testimony before the Board. Mr. Booth contended
that the overhead crossing of the CPR in Nepean Township just to the west of
Ottawa was put in on the understanding that the CPR would not oppose a level
crossing in Arnprior. but the CP denied this. The Board. however. ruled in fav~
our of the Parry Sound raihvay. permitting the crossing 500 feet west of the stat-·
ion. so that long trains on either line stopped at Arnprior. would not interfere
with the other railway.
Shortly afterward. open litigation between the OA& PS and the Canadian Pacific
flared again. when the two railways contested the use of Haggarty Pass. a narrow
defile in the Opeongo Mountains to the west of Renfrew. But once again the Booth
interests emerged victorious. and construction was carried from Arnprior and
Golden Lake over the Pass to Barrys Bay and Madawaska by September. 1894.
Twisting and curving its way over the rocky overlay of the Laurentian Shield.
the Ottawa. Arnprior & Parry Sound reached Cache Lake. in what is now Algon­
quin Park in May. 1895. and reached the Toronto-North Bay line of the Grand
Trunk on December 1st. 1896. The terrain was hilly and mountainous west of
Golden Lake. the rails reaching an elevation of 1.021 feet at Haggarty Pass. after
a seven-mile climb from Killaloe station on an average grade of 1%. The max­
imum summit of 1.605 feet was reached at the watershed between Brule Lake and
Rainy Lake. twenty-seven miles east of Scotia.
While the last section was being completed. the Parry Sound line acquired and
amalgamated with the Parry Sound Colonization Railway. enabling it to reach
Georgian Bay at Depot Harbour. 396.6 miles from the junction with the Central
Velmont Railway at East Alburgh. Vt. In 1899. the OA&PS was absorbed into the
parent Canada Atlantic Railway Company.
Though construction of the OA& PS was motivated originally by the lumber
traffic. the extens ion to Georgian Bay was mad e with the intention of provi ding a
new route eastward for wheatj grain elevators were built at Depot Harbour. and
ships were chartered on the Great Lakes under the title of the Canada Atlantic
Transit Company. This diversification brought with it other problems quite un­
connected with the lumber industry which had given it birth. such as the provision
of deep water channels at Depot Harbour and at Coteau Landing. The Booths acc­
ordingly decided to divest themselves of their railway syste:n, and it was sold to
the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada in 1905 for £2.880,000. The transfer of own­
ership did not come about before bids had been received from other roads. such
as the Canadian Northern and the New York-owned Rutland Railroad. of which
the Canada Atlantic would have been a natural extension.
Both in its independent phase and while under the control of the Grand Trunk.
the erstwhile Ottawa. Arnprior & Parry Sound was divided into two operating
Left: As completed in 1896, the Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry
SOClnd tiailway extended from the Ottawa River to
Georgian Bay, a distance of 262 miles through what
~as then a timbered wilderness.
Canadian Rail Page 1,36
subdivisions. one extending 130 miles from Ottawa to Madawaska. and the other
the remaining 134 miles to Depot Harbour. Madawaska was provided with a yard
and extensive engine terminal facilities. The remains of a Grand Trunk-era con­
crete roundhouse and shop remain to this day. abandoned to the wilderness.
A Grand Trunk timetable for the summer of 1908 shows daily-except-Sunday
passenger service in both directions between Ottawa and ~pot Harbour. West­
bound. No. 53 left Ottawa at 11 :50 AM and arrived at Depot Harbour at 9 :20 PM.
The corresponding eastward service. No. 52. left Depot Harbour at 7 :15 AM adn
arrived at Ottawa at 4:30 PM. The two trains crossed at Eganville. when on time.
Two known logging railways fed lumber to the CAR lines in the area between
Madawaska and Whitney; one. the Egan Estates Railway (also known as the Mc­
Cauley Central Railway), which was also owned by the Booth family, operated a
line north for about 15 miles to Booth Lake and Shirley Lake. It connected with
the OAtcPS at Egan Estates Junction, 4~ miles west of Madawaska. Another line.
the Whitney tc Opeongo Railway, ran north from Whitney for 14 miles to Opeongo
Lake. The Whitney & Opeongo connection is now used as a wye by Canadian Nat­
ional Railways at Whitney, the present western terminus of the line. Both logg­
ing railways were abandoned more than thirty years ago.
The Ottawa-Depot Harbour line remained intact until 1933, when a washout.
said to have been caused by a beaver dam. interrupted the connection between
Two Rivers and Algonquin Park stations, about six miles apart. Operation bet­
ween the two stations was discontinued effective March 1st of that year. but the
rails were not dismantled until 1940-42. On December 31st. 1946. operation was
discontinued between Whitney wye. mile 145.94, and Two Rivers, mile 162.40, and
the ~rack lifted in the summer of 1952. Westward from Algonquin Park to Kear­
ney, operation was discontinued in May 1959 and track dismantled immediately.
The line west of Scotia was abandoned in 1955.
Today, the rails of the former Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound Railway end
in the woods 220 miles short of Georgian Bay, just as they did when the line was
under construction seventy years ago. Much of the line is still laid with 72-pound
rail with OA&PS markings, but Canadian National diesels, with smooth and un­
hurried efficiency, now perform the meagre services.
RIGHT (TOp): Canadas only standard-gauge !If/lason-Fairlie
B08ie, Canada Atlantic Ry. 0-6-6 No.4, is pictured
here with a freight on O.A.& P.S. rails at Killaloe. It
was formerly the t,ansfield of the Burlington & Lam­
oille RR, a Vermont short line.
(Bottom): Also apparently taken at Killaloe, a dapper
4-4-0, Canada Atlantic No.6, pauses with passengers,
crew, and the inevitable station idlers.
(All phctos collection late ~.G.Cole)

Page 138
J.R. BOOTHS ROAD TODAY .. 4 …….
The OA&PS Revisited
~
Canadian Rail
by Fred Angus
JUNDA;tiMAl 24. 1964 was a cool sunny day in Ottawa, as
lIlor: than. 2.00 r .. ·:.Jtthusiuts prepared to board a special C_l~.R.
trunljl,t. l,i..niort $~@n. The occasion was the Ottawa RaUfans
exo~qnt .6pilnsPted. by Bill Williams and Al Barr t to Whitney,
Ont:arto .o#«r. ~ line 01 the former canada Atlantic Railway.
Precise!Yab .~hO ;L.M., E;D. T -7 the six car train 1. hauled by eN
A unit 6779,· . -and: consisting of baggage car 91)1, cafeteria car
424., ~nd .cOaches 1241.. J2~h 5622 and 54J1, left the station to
start toe·twtlva-hour, 297-& round trip_
The U.ne had been built in the 1890s as the Ottawa, ArnpH:or
&. Party SoUhd Railway, wilicn was a company formed by the
amalgamation at the Ottawa Arnprior &. Renfrew Railway, and the
Ottawa & Parry Sound Railway Co. The·O. A. &. P. S. was controlled
by the J. R.-Booell interests arid was, in effect, a westward exten­
sion o£ the Canada Atlantic Railway, to connect with the Great
Lakes at Georgian -Bay, and so provide a route Eastward fro III the
Lakes via the O. A. &. P. S. and C. A. railways.
Th~ O. A. &. P. S. reached Arnprior in -lvlay, 1893, and
aft.er £lame dispute, crossed the C.P.R. main line at grade,
was eXtended to -~ladawaska by Sertelllber, 1$94, Cache Lake in l-iay
1895, and to Scotia by the end of 896. At-this time; the O.A.&. P.
S. amalgamated with the-Parry SoUnd Colonization Railway, and so
achieved its connection with Georgian Bay. In 1899 the line was
forma~1y absorbed by the parent Canada Atlantic, and in 1905 was
sold, with the rest of the C. A. ttYI. to the Grand Trunk, finally
beCOming, in 1923, a part of Canadian National Railways.
After 1940, abandonments took place in the Western port­
ions .of the former O. A. &. P.S. At first the line was cut near
Two ..Rivers because of a washout, but by 1959 the abandonment had beeri
extended to include the whole line west of Whitney. Passenger
service between Ottawa and Barrys Bay survived until 1962, but
that. too is now gone, so this trip was tbe first over this line
for many of the excursionists.
Leaving Ottawa, the train ran 15 miles on the Beach­
burg Subdivision, then entered the Renfrew Subdivision on which
it continued the remainder of the trip to Whitney. The first s~
took place at Arnprior where a runpast was made. The next 45 miles
was covered without stopping, while the scenery changed gradually
to a 1Il0re rugged character as the train passed into the Laurentian
Shield. After a photo stop at Golden Lake the most spectacular
part of the trip began as the line climbed up Haggarty Pass on a
continuous grade … lith many curves, reminiscent of the now-abandoned
l,lontfort Subdivision, North of lolontreal. The line became more level
(Photograph at bottom of page 152)
..;::C..;::a:.:;n:.::a:.::d:..:i~a:;n–=R:..:..:::;a:..:il,–_____________________________ P~..!l1
THE O.A.~~REVI~ITED
beyond vlilno, 1021 feet above sea level, but continued gradually
up~ard to more than 1200 feet at Whitney. At Madawaska a movie run
was made on the bridge over the Madawaska River, and the particip­
ants were afforded the opportunity of inspecting the ruins of the
Grand Trunk roundhouse. This structure, which was used for less
than twenty years in the 1910-30 period, gave the impression of
an ancient Roman ruin rather than a 20th century railroad building.
The turntable pit and decaying crossties showed its true origin.
Another 16 miles carried the special to Whitney, the
present end of the line. Here, the only shower of the day caused
many to remain aboard while the engine and baggage car were turned
on the wye, leaving the cafe car to bring up the rear on the return
journey. By this time the rain had stopped, and the excursionists
spent the half hour remaining, exploring the area. It was seen
that much of the rail near the station bore the inscription:
CAl-1r·1ELS TOUGHENED STEEL vI Hl95 SEC bOA & P S RAILivAY, revealing
that this was the original rail with which the line had been laid,
nearly seventy years ago, and in continuous use since that time.
Leaving Whitney, the train proceeded East, another run­
past was held about 2 miles out of Whitney, then a stop at Barrys
Bay to inspect the old wooden water tank, still in good condition,
although now, alas, empty. No further stops were made, and as the
sun started to set, the train began passing through the suburbs of
Ottawa, which was reached at 8:40 PM.
Thus ended a trip
most of us, and the members
sincerely wish the sponsors
continuing to run these trips,
esting.
lhich was over new territory for
of the C. R. H. A. who attended
of the excursion every success in
which are most enjoyable and inter-
1964S~ER WOR!S….FUNQ -Acknowledgments
The Association gratefully sck­
nowledges receipt of the amounts list­
ed opposite, which are contributions
to the Summer Work Fund as a result
of the recent appeal of the Railway
Committee. The purpose of this fund
is to provide a labour force recruited
from the junior membership during
the school vacation period, to paint
and restore locomotives and rolling
stock for display.
Mr. Charles Viau ………… $ 100.00
Mr. A.J. Adams ………….. 3.00
Mr. Elliott Durnford …… ..
Mr. Brewster Barry …… ..
Mr. F.W.Gallagher …….. ..
Mr. William Clarke …….. .
Mr. Bruce Wilkie ………. ..
Mr. Donald McCartney …. .
Southam Printing Coy ….. .
!vIr. V.H. Coley ………….. .
Anonymous ……………….. .
Mr. Osborne M. Taylor .. ..
It is still not too late for further Mr. W.R. Donaldson …… ..
contributions. May we urge YOU to Mr. Neil Robertson …….. ..
send in your donation to the Fund at Mr. Bill Williams ……….. .
Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2. Every Mrs. Munroe …………….. .
donation will be acknowledged by mail. Rocky Mountain Branch .. ..
TOTAL …………………………………. ..
10.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
5.00
50.00
50.00
5.00
25.00
5.00
10.00
5.00
56.59
2.00
10.00
-~—-
~n.!:.?9

Canadian Rail Page 141
SNOWPLOW FOR A MARITIME SHORTLINE.
A Canadian railway byway was the Moncton 8. Buctouche Railway, w,hich op­
erated in the Province of New Brunswick between the communities encompassed
by its corporate title. 31.8 miles long, the Buctouche &: Moncton, as it was or­
iginally known, was completed in 1888 and pursued a notably impecunious career
until, by then reorganized and renamed, it was taken over by the Canadian gov­
ernment in 1918 to fo rm part of what is now Canadian National Railways.
When icy winds blew in from the Straits of Northumberland, bringing snow
in their wake, the M&:BR used the services of this snowplow to good advantage;
it was built by the renowned car-building firm of Rhodes Curry 8. Company, of
nearby Amherst, N.S., in the early years of the present century.
(Photograph at left)
:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:+
:+:+:+:+:+:+:+:
OUR COVER PHOTOGRAPH
FEW RAILWAY ARTIFACTS are as redolent of the Gay Nineties as the
narrow-vestibuled passenger car. Confined to a relatively short period immed­
iately preceding the ascendancy of the full-width vestibule, photographs of this
feature on Canadian equipment are a rarity. Th~ subject of our COver is a Can~
adian PacifiC: sleeping car, Enoshima, one of a series named imaginatively
with an Oriental flavour, and built by the CPR at Montreal in 1893. Subsequently
converted into an official car, this unit was most recently car #11, and was rec­
ently sold to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association, in the U.S.A. An­
other of the ,same breed was the sleeping car Calcutta, later E&:N Malahat
and instruction car #56, now preserved at Delson. In the course of seventy sea­
sons, both Enoshima and Calcutta, alas, have lost their narrow vestibules.
OTTAWA, ARNPRIOR &: PARRY SOUND PROFILE
AS AN APPENDIX to our account of the Whitney excursion, and the historical
summary of the Ottawa, Arnprior &: Parry Sound Railway, we reproduce, on the
succeeding pages, a mileage and elevation table of the Ottawa -Depot Harbour
railway, as prepared for the government in 19 I 5 by the Grand Trunk Railway.
The OA&:PS was generally undulating, with a general climb upward from Ott­
awa to Killaloe. Just west of this station, the railway climbed into the Lauren­
tian Shield, and the most pronounced upgrade was about 50 feet to the mile, or
one percent. The highest point on the line was at Mile 319.2, where a maximum
elevation of 1,605 feet was reached. Westward, the railway dropped a little over
a thousand feet to the western terminal at Depot Harbour, near Parry Sound.
Mileage on the railway was reckoned from the eastern end of the parent
Canada Atlantic Railway, at Albur·gh Junction, Vermont.
Page 142
r.liles from­Alburgh
June. :
GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY-OTTAWA DIVISION
Elevation
above mean sea level
_____ ——————————–1 ——
134·9 135·8
136·0
139·3
141·5
142·2
147·5
153·5 154·1
161·9
164·5 166·3 166·5
168·8
171·3
171·6
172·0
176·8
179·2 182·3
183 ·1
188·0
189·0
194·2
199·9
202·9 210·2
210·7
217·9 218·7
227·1 228·7 235·5
237·4 242·0
242·0
246·3 246·7 250·2 251·3
254·0 254·3
257·0
262·8
263 ·1 266·7
267·6
268·9 271·0 271·2
272·8
277 ·9 278·9
280·4
282·0
286·8
289·8 Ottawa, Central station
………… ___ … _ …….. __ ……… ,
Chaudiere junction
… __ ………………………………. 1
Canadian Pacific Ry., Prescott branch, crossing, Can. Pac. Ry.,
rail, 207; G.
T. Ry., rail …………………………… / Summit, rail.
………………….•. -………………… .
Graham Bay station ……………………………•.•… 1
Canadian Pacific Ry., main line, crossing, Can. Pac. Ry., rail, 217·7; G.
T. Ry. rail, ……………………………. . South March
station ………………………………… .
Carp station ………………………………………. .
Carp brook, water, 302; rail …………………………… . Kinburn station
……………………………………. . Summit, ground, 345; rail .
……………………………. . Mississippi river, water, 270; rail
……………………….. –
/Galetta station
………………….. -;-…………….•….
Marshall J3ay station ……………………………….. .
Madawaska river, water, 254; bed, 251; rail.
……………… /
~~~~~~rn s~~~tfi~ ·RY·.: ~ai~ ·l(~~,·c~~~i~g: i6S· O~il~ f~~~ M~~~i
Dochert brook, bed, 369; rail ………………•…•……….
IGlasgow station ……………………. : ……………… 1
:Summit, gr~und, 503: rail …………………•…………. 1
1
_Goshen station ………………….•.•……………..•..
i~:~~~:: j~~~~i~~: c~~~dk~ p~~ifi~ R·Y.; Ki~g;t~n ~~d i;e~b~~k~1
I branch, crossing …………………….. -………… . :Admaston
station …………………………………… .
! Douglas station …………………………………….. . iCaldwell station
………………………. _ ….. _ …….. . iEganville station
……………………………………. . IHurd hrook, water, 566; rail .
………………………….. . IGolden Lake, junction with Pembroke branch
……. _ ……… . Golden lake, water (Sept. 19, 1913)
…………….. _ …….. . Killaloe station
…………………..•… …….. _ ….. . Brennan brook, water, 588; rail.
……………••…………
Wilno station ………………………………………. . Summit,
Hagarty pass, ground, 1,024; rail ……………… . Barrys Bay station ..
………………………………… . Lake Kamaniskeg, water (Oct. 2, 19(0)
…………………. . IOtter lake, water, 1,021;
~i1 ……………… __ ………… .
ICarson lake, wate~, 992; rali ………………. _ …………. . Ground, 1,202; rail
……………… -……. _ ………….. . Aylen Lake station
………………….. _ …………….. . Gun lake, water, 1,166; rail
………………. _ …………. . Gun brook, bed, 1,166; rail
…………………………… . Opeongo Forks
…………………………… _ ……… . IOpeongo
rive~, water, 1,067; rail .. : … , ……………… __ .. . IMadawaska nver, water,
1,008; rall. ……………………. .
Madawaska station ………………… _ . _ ……………. . Egan
Estate station ……………………. _ ………….. . Macaulay Central junction, with Macaulay Central railway
…. . Bay
of Madawaska river, bed, 1,039; rail. ……………….. . LAmable brook,
water,-I,119; rail …….. _ …………….. .
I
LAmable station ……. , ……………………..•.•..••.. Madawaska river, water,
1,177; rail ……. _ …………….. . Rapid lake, water, 1,237; rail
…………………. _ ……… . Whitney, junction with
Whitney and Opeongo railway …….. .
I
Long I~ke, water, 1,281; rail …. -.: .. : …………………. 1
Summit, ground, 300 ft. east, 1,330, rail……. . . .. _ ……… . Rock lake, water _
……………………… _ . _ …….. 1
Rock Lake station …………………….. _ . . . __ ….. ,
213·7
206
229 279
225
241·6
283·1
310·3
309·7
311·5
338
290·0 292·7
312·2
292
300
300·1
393 443 498
421·2
402·8
412
437 495 570 579 590 553 594 597 956
1,021
984 927
1,026
1,002
1,180
1,157·2
1,182
1,171
1,126
1,080
1,031
1,0350
1,093·6
1,053 1,052 1,134
1,127
1,188
1,248
1,268·7
1,290
1,320
1,281 1,292 ·1
A
.
Miles from
Alburgh J unc.
GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY.-oTTAWA DIVISION
Page 143
Elevation
above mean
sea level
—— —-.—–i—–
292·2 295·7 298·0 300·5 301·8 302·0 304·8 305·9 309·2 309·4 309·9 310·0
313·9 316·3 319·2 319·1 322·5 324·2 325·0 328·1 328·3
333·0 333·6 335·9
337·1 340·8 346·2 349·4 350·6 351· 7
355 ·1
357·1 360·1 363·7 364·1 366·6 369·2 369·7 373·8
374·7
375·1
377 ·7 377 ·7
378·5
380·9
384·1 386·8 388·1 389·0 389·5
389·8 390·6
391·1
391·1
392 ·1
393·8 396·6
Whitefish lake, water, 1,281; rail … , ….. , ………….. , …. 1
Lake of Two ~ivers, water, 1,289; rail ……….. ; ……….. 1
Madawaska nver, water (J une 23, 1914), 1,294; rail ……. _ … .
,
Madawaska river, water (Ju~e 23,1914),1,335; rail ………… 1
ICache Jake, water, 1,406; rail …………………………. .
IAlgonquin Pa
rk station: . . ………………………….. . I
Summlt, ground, 1,509; rail.,.. … . . . . . . . . . .. . ………….. iSource lake,
water, 1,467; rall. ………………………… .
IJ oe lake,
water U une 25, 1914) ……………………….. .
lJoe Lake station ………. , …………………………. . C
anoe lake, water, 1,379; rail …………………………. .
Canoe Lake station …………………………………. .
Potter lake, water, 1,426; rail ………………………… .
Brule
Lake station ………………………………….. .
Summit, highest point on the line, rail. ………………….. .
Stream, water, 1,517; rail. ………………………….. .
Rainy lake, water, 1,438; rail …………………………… 1
Rainy Lake station ………………………………….. .
Rainy river, water, 1,432; rail. . . .. . . . . . . .. . ……………. .
Summit, ground, 200 ft. west, 1,536; rail ………………… .
Round lake, water, 1,510; rail …………………………. .
Cashman brook, water, 1,355; rail …………… , ……….. .
Ravensworth station ………………………………… .
Tonawanda river, water, 1,261; rail …………………….. .
Lake, water, 1,260; rail …………………..•••…………
Kearney station ……………………………………. . Scotia,
junction with Toronto and North Bay division ………. .
Government road crossing ……………………………. .
Summit, ground, 1,151; rail ……………………………•
Mud Lake siding ………………………………….. .
Depression, bed, 1,013; rail. ………………………….. .
Sprucedale station ………………………………….. .
Whitehall station ………………………………. ….. .
Bear Lake station ………………………..•…………. Bear lak
e, water …………………………………… . Seguin
river, water (Aug. 7, 1914),969·5; rail …………….. .
Seguin Falls
station …………………………………. . Seguin
river, water. 936; rail. …………………………. .
Lake, water, 950; rail ………………………………… . Diamond lake, wate
r, 892; rail ………………………… . E
dgington sta tion …………………………………… .
Branch of Seguin river, water, 746; bed, 739: rail ……… , ….. .
Marsh, Maple and Duck Jakes, water ……………………. .
Ma
ple Lake station …………………………………. .
Beatty siding (summit), ground, 914; rail ………………… . Pe
nder lake, water, 839; rail. …………………………. .
Falding station (c1o~d) ……………………………… . IOtter Lake
station ………………………………….. .
Otter lake, water …………………………………… . Bo
yne river, water, 681; bed, 678; rail ………………….. .
P
otaba winnana lake, water …………………………… .
Jame$ Bay junction, with Canatlian Northern Ry., Toronto and
Caprcol ………………………………… . …… . Canad
ian t:lorthern Ry., Toron~o and Capreol, crossing, C. N. Ry., rail,
686; G. T. Ry., rail ……………………… .
Canadian Pacific Ry., Toronto and Sudbury, crossing, Can. Pac.
Ry., ra
il, 684; G. T. Ry., rail ………………………. .
Boyne river, water, 623; rail ………… ……………… .
Rose
Point station …………………………………… .
j
Depot Harbour station ………………………………. .
Lake Huron, mean water (1871.1900) ……….. , ………… .
1,294
1,297 1,309·5 1,3860 1,414 1,418·9 1,497 1,
475
1,381·4 1,395·6 1,393 1,392
·1
1,437 1,470·7 1,605·0 1,546·6 1,452 1,452·2 1,439
1,527 1,518 1,433 1,411·7 1,29
2·9
1,267 1,109·8 1,081·S-1,143 1,146 1,1
38
1,028
1,074 ·5 1,097·8 1,038·3 1,030
9!lO·6
962·8 979·7
961
896
891·3
775
746
797·0 901·
2
851
770
736·9 681 6
88
676
686·3
660
659
635
600·2
590
581
Page 144 Canadian Hail
CREDIT VALLEY MEMOIRS
by ALFRED PRICE*
*These memoirs were written in 1926 by Mr. Price. follow­
ing his retirement from the post of General Manager.
Eastern Lines. of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
and are now published for the first time.
c:?EORGE LAIDLA W. after having taken the leading part in the construc­
;j:f: tion of the Toronto. Grey &r: Bruce and the Toronto &r: Nipissing rail-
ways (the former now that portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway
between Toronto and Owen Sound and west of Orangeville. and the latter the line
of Canadian National Railways between Toronto and Coboconk) foresaw the ad­
vantages to the City of Toronto and to the people living west thereof, of a railway
from Toronto to Woodstock. Ingersoll and St. Thomas, connecting with the Mich­
igan Central. and also north from Streetsville Junction to Orangeville and Elora.
A great amount of preliminary work was necessary. and Mr. Laidlaw. with
characteristic energy wrote pamphlets to the various municipal bodies and to
representative farmers and others along the proposed routes. setting forth the
advantages to them of a railway that would enable them to get their produce to
thp. City of Toronto and their supplies from there. He also travelled extensively
throughout the territory delivering speeches urging his hearers to render finan­
cial aid to the ~nterprise. As a result. bonuses were granted by the municipal­
ities and townships amounting to $750.000; the City of Toronto also subscribed
$ 350.000 and the Province of Ontario $ 3,000 per mile. the latter sum amounting
to approximately $525,000.
On February 15th, 1871. a charter was secured from the Provincial Govern­
ment for the construction of the railway, and men were sent out to arrange for
the necessary right-of-way on the most favourable terms possible. In the mean­
time Mr. Laidlaw was obliged to go to London to secure rails and fastenings,
and notwithstanding the most strenuous opposition on the part of the Grand Trunk
interests, he. with the aid of the Hon. Edward Blake, succeeded in getting on cre­
dit what were required for the undertaking.
Railway building in those days was a strenuous job. and the man who under­
took it had no bed of roses. The building of the Credit Valley was no exc1eption
to this rule. Hampered for the want of funds. opposed by existing railways in its
efforts to secure an entrance to the City of Toronto. a strike of all its employees
around Toronto in 1880 and innumerable other obstacles made the task one of al­
most insurmountable difficulty.
RIGHT: Typical of the motive power of the Credit Valley Railway was the
handsome 4-4-0 LL, Morrison, named after one of the original dir-
ectors of the road. It was built by Kingston (#234) in 1881. (OSAL)

enit
aile
ailwa
Running
in
Connection
with
Port
Dover
Railway.

O~.
I
A8S.*t
.Ot
••
Taking
effect Monday,
9th
September, 1878.
~
laOIBfEAST·
11
STATIONS.
aOINa
WEST.
~
I
No.1.
No.3.
II
No.2. No.4.
~
A.M. P.M.
I
A.M. P.M.
o
7.40
4.00
Del). Ingersoll. Arr.
9.15
5.25
10
2
7.454.05
x
Centreville.
9.10
5.20
8
5 7.55
4.15
1
Beachville.
9.00
5.10
5
10
8.10
4.30

Woodstock.,
8.45
4.55
0 -, 8.15 4.
35
.l
Arr.
Woodstock,P,D.&L.H.Ry.
Dep.
8.40
1
4.50
,
x
Flag
Station-Will
stop
on
signal.
c.
S.AIOS.AW~
Septem
ber, 1878.
Managing
Director.
——-


Canad·ian Hail Page 147
CREDlT VAU-EY RA~WAY (contd)
In 1876. just fifty years ago. the Directors were:
George L~1aw. President
John Gar~
James L. Mo·rriaon
Angus Morriaoft
Robert Hay.
C.G. Campbell. Vice President
John Macnab
R.W. Elliott
William Arthurs
and mere does Dot·~ to haVe be-en many changell in the personnel of the
Board during the ·ti1nflfhat the Credit Valley existed as a separate corporation.
The rail~a.y wa. then under c:onstruction, and three years later. on Septem­
ber 19th. 1879. it wllj·l:ormilly opened by His Excellency the Marquis of Lorne.
who was at that time the Governor Gene ral of Canada. The. ceremony tookplac-e
at Milton. tile ·Chairman being Hon. George W. Allan. Chairman of the Trua.te_
of the Municipal !frat ·Fund of the Credit Valley Railway. A large nwnber of
Directors and bIIlstJl.ilHe men from Toronto and other parts of Onta-rio were ·pr·e­
sent. the whole-parw havmg gone out from Toronto on a special txain. pulled hy
the C.V·.R. engine R.W. ELLIOTT, built at Kingston. Arches had been er-ed;ed
at Cooksville. Streetsville and Milton. all of which as well all the locomotive
were Dedecke desi-anated. the follOwing officers of the Company were present:
James Ross,
J .C. Bailey.
J .H. Barber,
H.S. Holt.
H.E. Suckling.
General Superintendent
Chiet Engineer
Assistant Engineer
Assistant Engineer
Sec retary-Tre8surer.
Therailway had several uncompleted gaps. but a little later in the year_the
bridgfl Over the Grand River at Galt and the branches north of Streetsville J.un.c­
tion were ready for traffic so that regular services were established between
Parkdale and Ingersoll and between Streets ville and Orangeville and Elora.
However. before the formal opening regular trains were running between Milton
and Parkdale, and a bus service between Parkdale and the Toronto Union Station
carrying about six hundred passengers per day to and from the Toronto Exhibit­
ion. It was not very long after the formal opening until most all of the men em­
ployed in the vicinity of Toronto went on strike for wages which wer~ four mOnths
in arrearSj after ~ing away but a few days. the Company raised sufficient funds
with which to pay them and they returned to their work.
But there were other signs of povert, Sometimes the railway was so h.a..tod
up and its credit gone that the offic er s ,·e ~e at their wits end to keep a. su~V
of coal on hand for the use of their engines. Then Peter Stephen would be sent
down to the Grand Trunk yard to see what he could do to indUce the yardmen:to
place a car of coal on the intprchange track. This plan succeeded for a time.
but there was a stop to this mode of keeping up a supply of Credit Valley fuel.
Perhaps the owners objected to being filched of their coal. or possibly the yard­
men became unreasonable in their demands. In any case, the Company was ham­
pered. even to the extent of delaying passenger trains until arrangements could
be made with Paddy Burns to send some coal up to the Parkdale station in

.
Canadian Rail Page 149
CREDIT VALLEY RAILWA Y (contd)
carts, and there to shovel it into the tender of an outgoing locomotive, which
would be standing coupled to the cars with passengers aboa.rd, and all ready to
pull out.
There were many amusing experiences in the office of the Treasurer, Mr.
Suckling. He had between his desk and the office door, a number of screens SO
arranged that a person having any business with him would have to talk around
them, or thread his way through. One day, however, a great, husky, bullying
navvy from the grading gang came to town, and instead of observing the usual
formalities, he simply plunged through the screens, knocking them down and sm­
ashing them. As he reached the surprised Treasurer, he demanded in thundering
tones that he disgorge enough cash to satisfy his claim for wages. For a mom­
ent, Suckling thought that his hour had corne but his assistant, Ross Mackenzie,
a giant in stature and strength and, with Suckling, a member of the championship
team of the Toronto Lacrosse Club. hove in sight, and grabbing the obstreperous
individual by the scruff of the neck and the seat of the pants, ran him out of the
office and hu.rled him down the stairs:
There was considerable talk in those days of a snow plough that had been in­
vented at Orangeville by a man by the name of Jull. The Postmaster at Toronto,
John Leslie, had acquired some interest in the plough and arrangements were
made by him with the Credit Valley officers to demonstrate its practicability.
The plough was not ready for the test until the last snow of the season had fall~
en; nev~rtheless, it was sent to Parkdale. and a gang of men went into fence
corners and other shady places. and with their shovels brought forth enough
snow for th~ demonstration. Up to that time. the Credit Valley had used only
bucking ploughs, and it was claimed that the new plough represented quite a
distinct advance in principle over the old one; that by placing a locomotive at the
rear. coupling it up, connecting the stearn with the plough and pushing it close
against the snow, the front end with a series of knives would revolve. reduce the
snow to powder and throw it through a funnel Over the right-of-way fence; The
test was pronounced a success. and from the modest litUe rotary plough that
demonstrated its power over the elements on that day over forty-five years ago,
the enormous steel rotary plough of today was evolved.
On March 25th. 1883, the railway secured a Dominion charter and on Nov~
ember 30th of the same year. the Ontario &. Quebec Railway. which had been
completed between Toronto Junction and Smiths Falls; the Toronto. Grey &. Br­
uce Railway; and the Credit Valley Railway were consolidated under one man­
agement. Of course, the Canadian Pacific Railway was in control. but it was not
until the following year, January 1884. that the amalgamated railways were ab-
sorbed by it. (continued p. 153)
LOCOMOTIVE and FIRE WA TE.R (Left)
Even the thought that our readers might think that we had abandoned our all­
egiance to the principles of temperance did not deter us from publishing this
interesting photograph in this issue. It shows Grand Trunk Railway 2-6-0 No.
517 co~pled to a car of fire-water. The latter was consigned to a gentleman in
Vancouver who, we preswne, must have been planning an enormous binge! While
we cannot be sure of this. we ~ know that No. 517 was built at Point St. Charles
Works in 1881. had 18×26 cylinders and 63 drivers. carried 140 pounds press-
ure, was renumbered 2410 in 1910 and was scrapped prior to 1923. . …….
Page 1.50 Canadian Rail
CREDIT VALLEY RAILWA Y (concluded)
It was in 1883 that the track connections were made between the Credit V al~
ley and the Ontario 8< Quebec railways at Toronto Junction, and a set of telegraph
instruments were installed in a little shack placed for the pUIpose, approximate~
lyon the site of the present.passenger station at West Toronto. At that time,
there were n:o streets nor houses for miles around, except an occasional farm
house. This is mentioned simply for the reason that since then a marvellous
development has taken place in that section of the City of Toronto, and it is hard
to realize that only a little over forty years ago, West Toronto was nothing but
farms.
When the Credit Valley began running trains, they were operated with what
was then regarded as modern equipment, but before long many new devices
were introduced. The old pin and link coupling was superseded by the auto­
matic draw bar i what was then known as the Armstrong brake, a system
whereby the speed of trains was controlled by hand, gave place to the Westing­
house air brake and instead of passenger cars being heated by stoves, Baker
heaters were installed. A couple of antiquated parlour cars were bought from
the New York Central and placed on the run between Toronto and S~. Thomas.
The rear ends were rounded and when repainted and renamed Victoria and
Humber. they were quite popular. However, in time, the sills rotted and they
were withdrawn and tied up in the Parkdale yard where they remained until they
became the property of Canadian Pacific. One day, Mr. VanHorne was passing
through the yard with Car Foreman Joe OBrien, saw the cars and asked about
them, and when told of the condition they were in said, Burn the damned things:
and before he had left the premises. the order was carried out.
The President, George Laidlaw. who was instrumental in building of no less
than four railways in Ontario, the Toronto. Grey 8< Bruce, the Toronto 8< Nipiss­
ing. the Credit Valley –all converging on Toronto –and the Victoria Railway
from Lindsay to Haliburton, and to whose faith, energy. perseverance and force
of character. Toronto owes more than to any other one man her present comm­
ercial supremacy in the Province of Ontario, retired to his farm on Balsam Lake
near Coboconk after the Credit Valley had been taken Over. and lived quietly
th~re until 1889. when he passed away at the comparatively early age of sixty
one. His name is almost forgotten now. but his monument is 675 miles of rail­
way throughout some of the most productive parts of Ontario. and all doing trib­
ute to the City of Toronto.
CANADIAN PACIFICS NEV TORONTO YARD OPENS JUNE 16rH
Canadian Pacific Hailway opened i1:s nENf :jp15,OOO,OOO electronic
and computer-controlled hump yard at Agincourt, near loront;o, on
Tuesday, June 16th. The opening took place at a spectacular cere­
r.1ony in which a 90~foot, tri-level automObile carrier was released
to break through a barricade of five hundred helium-filled balloons
which were sent skyward to mark t;he inauguration of what is claimed
to be Canadas most modern railway yard. Signal for the release of
the car was given by Senator J. J. Connolly, Government leader in
the Senate, who SUbstituted for lransport ~jinister John ,d. Pickers­
gill. Those in attendance included the President of Canadian Pac­
ific, ~r. N.R. Crump, directors and officers of the Company and 500
invited guests.
(continued on opposite page)
Canadian Rail
————_£.~-
The public works director of the City of Montreal recently announced that
tunnelling of the citys rapid -trans it under ground Metro sys tern has almost
reached the half-way mark. two years after work commenced in May. 1962.
More than six miles of the projected 15.1-mile initial system have been com­
pletely excavatedj four miles of the excavations have been concreted and work is
going on apace at the station strllctures.
Excavation of all of the east-west Line No. 1 is now under contract. In
the shopping area. this route follows Burnside Street and as a consequence.
much of this thoroughfare is closed to traffic. Street diversions are in place
where main streets cross the route at right angles. such as at Bleury and At­
waterj at the latter. use of the cut-and-cover principle for the Metro station
enables the track area to be observed in open air during the construction stage.
Contracts have now been let for all of the north-south Line No.2. except
that portion in the downtown area. The city authorities expect that the first con­
tracts for Line No.4 –to connect the city with the International Exposition site
in the St. Lawrence River and with the city of Longueuil on the south shore -­
will be awarded following opening of tenders on June 23rd.
Construction has been under way for some time on the yard and shop facil­
ities at Cremazie and St. Lawrence. on the site of the former Youville general
repair shop of the Montreal Transportation Commissionj the basic track dia­
gram for the new facility is shown On page 153. Due to the utilization of the
pneumatic running gear principle. it is apparently necessary to shelter all above
ground tracks from direct precipitationj as a consequence. all of the Youville
yard layout is to be covered with pre-cast concrete form roof supported upon
steel framing. as illustrated on page 152. Much of this structure has now been
completed. Delivery of the rolling stock and other supplies by railway is evid­
ently anticipated. as Canadian National Railways has completed a siding from
the lAssomption Subdivision into that part of the MTC property north of Legen­
dre Street. with provision to connect across the street with the Metro.
CPRS NEAt TORONTO YARD (continued)
The new yard makes use of such space age induRtrial aids as an
electronic computer, radar, television, radio, microwave, and a
number of automatic and remote-control devices. Enlistment of
such advanced technology will enable Canadian Pacific to cut in
half the time required to handle cars passing through the greater
Toronto area. It is the fifth push button type yard to be placed
in service in Canada in recent years, the other facilities being
CPs st. Luc Yard at Montreal, and eNs Montreal, Moncton and Win­
nipeg yards.
The yard contains 90 miles of track and 311 switches, with
capacity for more than 5,000 freight cars. It occupies 432 acres
and employs 820 individuals. The customary hump leads to a 63-
track classification yard. Speed of cars on the hump is governed
by electronic readlng.s on a cars rollability, its weight, the
track into which it is being directed, and the number of cars al­
ready in that track; these factors are all considered by the
computer and the speed of the car regulated accordingly by the re­
tarders. Locomotive and car repair facilities complete the complex.

LEFT (Top): Roof superstructure for exposed Metro tracks along Legendre
Street in Youville Yard. Angle of photograph is shown by arrow on dia-
gram below. (At lower right). (Photo by Robert Half yard)
LEFT (Bottom): OA&PS REVISITED, Canadian National unit No. 6779 app­
roaches during runpast just east of Whitney on the May 24th excursion
described elsewhere in this issue. (Photo by Denis Peters)
—1
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Page 154
Canadian Rail
* Passenger service may be slowly on the decline in North America. but it is
making headlines in other parts of the world. A recent clipping from the
Japan Times sent in by our Far East Representative reports that only
one region. the Kansai Area of the Japan National Railways. is to get no
less than 2.986 extra trains this summer! The report goes on to say that
the total mileage of all of the extra trains thus set up will represent a
twelve percent increase over last year ••••••••••
* Resplendent in a new paint job. Canadian Pacific D-I0 4-6-0 No. 894 left
Montreal in the beginning of June bound for Kitchener. Ont •• where it is
to be put on display as a civic project.
By contrast. a rusty and unpainted Canadian National 4-8-4. No. 6200. was
sent to Ottawa about the same time where it is to be placed on the site of
the proposed National Museum of Canada. near Sussex Street. It is re­
ported that the authorities wished to placed the engine in situ before Can­
adian Pacific removes its facilities completely from Sussex Street. It is
understood that the engine will be restored and repainted when the display
opens to the public. understood to be still some time in the future.
* Canadian Pacific is taking delivery of its 8200 class General Motors diesel­
electric road switcher locomotives. Up to the beginning of June. units
8202 to 8209 had been delivered and placed in service.
* Long-dormant equipment from the Morrissey. Fernie & Michel Railway
(Michel to Coal Creek. B.C.) is finding new homes. Several wooden coaches
have been moved to Calgary. and are being refurbished at Ogden Shops of
the CPR for the projected Calgary pioneer park railway. Motive power is
reported to be Canmore Mines Limited 0-6-0 No.3. a former CPR U-3
class switcher. It is said that the engines mechanical condition
will preclude operation under steam. and that it will be propelled by a
diesel power plant! The MF&M diesel (Baldwin 73042. October 1946)
a 660-h.p. unit. has been purchased by Johnston Terminals at New Westmin­
ster. B.C. This pier. located across the Fraser River from the Royal
City handles cargo to and from Alaska. The engine is painted black and
still lettered MF&M No.1. Peter Cox. who sends in this report. observes
that all the Baldwin diesel-electric locomotives in Canada are now located
in and around Vancouver.
* Railway Week in Belleville. Ontario. to be held during the last full week of
June. will feature twice-daily trips by CN 4-8-4 No. 6167 from Belleville to
Anson Junction and other points., A number of stearn locomotives will be
on display including 4-8-4 No. 6400. 4-6-4 No. 5700 (alias 5703). 4-4-0 No.
40 and 0-6-0T No. 247. The observance is being held to mark the removal
of railway tracks from downtown Pinnacle Street.
Canadian Rail Page 155
* While Montreals Metro is under construction, talks between independent sub­
urban municipalities on the Island of Montreal and adjoining Ile Jesus, now
served by Canadian Nationals electrified suburban service through the Mount
Royal Tunnel to St. Eustache/Deux Montagnes, have developed to the stage
where a firm is to be hired for transit consultation on converting the CNR
into rapid-transit. As reported previously, CNR has offered to operate the
service provided that a separate authority is created to own the system and
meet the cost of constructing and operating the $ 25 million system. Reports
indicate that the system would extend into and south of Montreals Central
Station, and possibly be extended to the present site of CN Bridge Street sta­
tion in order to serve the Montreal entrance to the 1967 Exposition. Un­
like the Montreal lv!etro, however, plans apparently call for rolling stock to
be large and of high capacity, running on conventional railway track.
~
lMta~ll~t=~~~~~~~=
~I,
16 I 2 I Febj £
191 3 I ~farl …
20 J 4 I Apr.1
211 3 I ; ay;
THE ASSOCIA TION IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THA T IT IS PLANNING TWO STEAM-HAULED
EXCURSIONS OVER CANADIAN NA TIONAL RAIL­
WA YS OUT OF MONTREAL ON THE WEEKEND OF
SEPTEMBER 26TH/27TH. DETAILS WILL BE RE­
LEASED SHORTLY TO OUR READERS.
IT IS EXPECTED THA T THE LOCOMOTIVE WILL
BE CNS NEWLY-REFURBISHED 4-8-4, NO. 6218.
DONT SA Y WE DIDNT GIVE SUFFICIENT ADVANCE
NOTICE! !
~===~~==
l ~ 1 iif 1 =~ I ~ I;~ I ~ I ~ I ~ I b I ~ I I ~ I ~ I I ~ i ~ ~ -I ~; ~ 1 ~ H ++~ I <; I ~ I r 1 ~ i
f ~ ~ ~ la 1S11~1~1~1~1~1~1~1~1,.1~1~1,; s bl~j1.H~H+n o~
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO. e. Jg
NOT GOOD FOR PASS;£.E. ~ ~ 221 6 ~~;
23171 )d)11 This hale of TICRET is of ~o V.-LUE except to the Porte] in chl1fg-e o( Cnr, who mllst scm] it to the I .. –I~
24 r 8 I Aug,] Audito!, with ,cport, fit end of each tlip. tV tD
251 91 5 ~llOJ OCL. ___________________ ~~~.——–,_–%~-Pr-~h~,,-.~~;_~_I
!121 no<.
From .. To
?:Illll No.. ,, 0 .i,,, ,,,, •• ,, f, p,,,,,d,,,. I H ;: ::~:~2.:~
;f ff f (fTi f J (
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1131 1885
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I 161 1888
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Sleeping Car Ticket for car Honolulu, Montreal to Winnipeg, June 28th, 1886
on the first regular train to operate from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
Progress
Doug Wright –Montreal Star
After all these years weve ridden In their dirty old gon doIas, when they finally get some decent accommodation
for us they run
It so Jast we cant get on!
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
CANADIAN RAIL: Published eleven times annually by the Publications Committe,
Canadian Railroad Historical Association. Subscription included
with Associate Membership: $4.00 annually.
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS CONNITTEE: David R. Henderson
EDITOR, CANADIAN RAIL: Anthony Clegg
Villiam Pharoah
John W. Saunders
Frederick F. Angus
Hyman Mande 1
Robert Half yard
Orner Lavallee
Lindsay Terreau
S.S. Horthen
Michael Bould
ASSISTANT EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
COf1fiITTEE:
SUOSCRIDERS I
DEFORE YOU MOVE-WRITE!
ADVERTISING MANAGER:
,1 IW81 5 wcok~ Leforc you
moc. !lend us leller, a COM,
or It pOII-o{Cicc chnnlc.of.
addre.u rorlll lellius UII hodl 100r
OLD 0011 your NEW addrc.·..,Cj.
MEflBERSHIP SECRETARY:
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
OTTAM VALLEY: PACIFIC
COAST:
ALGOMA:
SASKATCHE~AN :
ROCKY MOUNTAIN:
fAR EAST:
BRITISH ISLLS:
Kenneth F. Chivers, Apartment 3, 67 Somerset Street West, Ottawa, Onto
Peter Cox, 2936 Hest 28th Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Hilliam F. Cooks ley , 594 McDonald Avenue, Sault Ste. Marie, Onto
J.S. Nicolson, 2329 Dufferin Avenue, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
V.H. Coley, 11243-72 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta
William D. McKeown, 900 Senriyama (Ouzo), Souita City, Osaka, Japan
John H. Sanders, 10 Church St., Ampthill, iledsford, England

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