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Canadian Rail 152 1964

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Canadian Rail 152 1964

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Number 152 / February 1964
MANY INTERESTING F,VENTS have punctuated the history
of Canadian Pacifics Windsor Station in Montreal, which
observes its seventy-fifth anniversary this month. Here,
engineman and conductor compare orders beside the pilot
of engine #2803, as Train No.7, the Dominion, prepares
to leave Montreal on the fiftieth anniversary of transcon­
tinental railway service, June 28th, 1936.
Pen-y-oarran
1804
~
OVE OF THE STEAM LOCOMOTIVE is so much part and parcel of the
hobby of many rail amateurs, as to take on the proportions of a rel­
igion. It therefore seems almost superfluous to remind the faithful
that Friday, February 21st, 1964, is one of the red-letter high holidays.
That date will mark the 160th anniversary of the operation of the worlds
first steam railway locomotive engine, which went its precarious way over a
tramway plateway, at a top speed of five miles per hour, from the Pen-y-darran
ironworks, at Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales, to the Monmouthshire Canal at
Abercynon, a distance of nine miles. On this epochal journey, it hauled five
wagons in which Were loaded seventy men and ten tons of iron. The inventor, a
huge Cornishman named Richard Trevithick, did not ride, or so it is recorded.
Instead, he strode alongside the locomotive, looking to the needs of his five-ton
charge, which apparently possessed no footplate for its driver. Friends walked
with Trevithick, cutting a path through the trees and shoving boulders aside so
that the engine, which loomed so much larger than the customary horses and
wagons which normally used the plate way, could travel unimpeded.
It would be trite to call Trevithick the worlds first steam locomotive en­
thusiast; he was so much more than that, the creator of the thing itself, the in­
terlocutor who saw it transformed from imagination into hissing, smoking, fire­
belching reality. And while Time has dealt kindly with Trevithick, giving him
deserved precedence in his field, it is no tribute to the otherwise open-minded
and enterprising men of the early years of the English industrial revolution,
that they allowed him to die a pauper, alone and unrecognized, in 1833. Nor is
the Pen-y-darran locomotive with us; it was broken up as surplus works mach­
inery by SOme incredibly narrowsighted boor, unknown, as he well deserved to
be. This pioneer engine was so far ahead of its time that, save for a few halting
and fumbling successors, a quarter of a century was to elapse before the Rain­
hill Trials opened up the future for the locomotive engine. Nonetheless, every
steam locomotive, be it a Mallet articulated compound or a humble 0-4-0T, is
the direct lineal and spiritual descendant of the Pen-y-darran machine, ugly and
awkward though it may appear to our more sophisticated tastes.
Even in these latter days of the steam locomotive as a utilitarian artifact,
let us never allow memory to erase the recollection of that peerless day in the
sombre folds of the Welsh hills, one hundred and sixty years ago, when the
steam locomotive was born.

The original Windsor Station, as opened in 1889.
by OMER LA VALLEE
TUST SEVENTY-FIVE YE.ARS AGO,
~ early in 1889. the orderly Vic-
torian composure of the inhab­
itants of Montreal was disturbed by the
appearance of a garish signboard which
had seemingly appeared overnight along
the north side of St. Antoine Street; its
inscription was there for all to see, in
black letters six feet high on a white­
painted board fence:
BEATS ALL CREATION –THE NEW
C.P.R. STATION!
It was, withal, sacrileg­
ious in both spiritual and temporal con-
ON
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1506

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This 1879 map shows what the site of Windsor Station looked like ten years
before its opening. The block formed by Windsor. Osborne. St. Antoine and
Mountain streets was then a pleasant residential area. with a few shops and
stores along St. Antoine. where the Montreal City Passenger Railways
horsecars ran. Bisson and Donegani streets have since disappeared.
Canadian Rail Page 29
texts, repudiating the whole Book of Genesis and all that it impl­
ied, as well as the lesser accomplishments of mere man in the per­
iod of recorded civilization. In point of fact, the building could
with difficulty compare with the Parthenon or the Temple of Baalbek
much less with the. Gothic cathedrals of the Renaissance, but the
statement itself did reflect the enthusiasm of the infant Canadian
Pacific Railway for the new headquarters and terminal which was then
rising at the corner of Windsor and Osborne streets. More partic­
ularly, it portrayed the characteristic personal views of William
C. Van Horne, to whose authorship this slogan is at.tributed.
IvJontrealers had watched with more than passing interest as the
historic hillside orchards and farms along the south flank of the
little mountain –WestmoWlt –were bought up to be used as a
railway right-of-way. Starting at what is now Montreal West, the
four-and-a-half mile route eastward had an easy course initially
lying generally to the south of the villages of Montreal JWlction,
Kensington and Notre-Dame-de-Grace, a bare quarter-mile or so from
the edge of the escarpment which rose above Coteau Saint Pierre.
As Montreal was approached, however, the hillside track took on a more
tortuous aspect, ending up in a near two percent drop from
Cote St. Antoine (now WestmoWlt) along a man-made shelf whose
southern exposure was faced with stone arches, into the four-track
terminal at Hindsor Street; and thats what they called it –Wind­
sor Street Station. In fact, the street named the station, though
at a later date, the word Street was dropped and the building was
called simply lJindsor Station.
To design and construct the initial building, which was sur­
mOWlted by a small tower mildly suggestive of Windsor Castle, the
railway company engaged the services of the noted architect Bruce
Price, gifted son of an equally-gifted mother, Emily Post. The
site chosen was a commanding one, at the southwest corner of the
old Catholic burying ground which by then had become Dominion Sq­
uare. The land purchased for the building itself went back to the
rear lot line on YJindsor Street, bounded on the north by Osborne
Street and on the south by Donegani Street. The stone terrace
houses along the south side of Osborne west of the station remained
undisturbed, and the four-track terminal access was in the rear of
the backyards of these homes. The locale has some cultural inter­
est for French-speaking Canadians in that it was the scene, more
than half-a-century before the station was built, of the foundation
of the Societe-Saint-Jean-Baptiste, whose initial meeting was held
in 1834 in the garden of what was then the Belestre-McDonell home.
The
land for the site had been purchased in 1887, hard on the
heels of the completion of the Lachine Bridge, which was the key in
the development of the western terminal lines of the CPR on the Is­
land of Montreal. Hitherto, Canadian Pacific had used the Dalhousie
Square or Quebec Gate Barracks station, at Berri and Notre Dame
streets, which had been inherited from the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa
& Occidental Railway, when the western division of that line had
been acquired in 1882. All trains used this east-end station, inc­
luding those bOWld for Ontario and western Canada. The only route
out of Montreal for these services, until completion of the Winch­
ester Subdivision in 1887, was via Ste. Therese, Lachute and Ottawa
(Broad Street) to Carleton Place. There, western trains turned
northward up the Ottawa valley, while Ontario trains turned south
to Smiths Falls, then west through Perth and Peterboro to Toronto.
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Diagrams show arrangement
of Windsor Station from 1889
to 1900, right, and from 1900
to 1910, left. In the latter
year, construction was comm­
enced on major extensions and
rearrangement, as shown at
page 39.
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Canadian Rail Page 31
jlhile the station facilities had been at what was later to be­
come Place Viger, the headquarters offices of the Company were at
Place dArmes. The building which was to amalgamate these facil­
ities took shape during 1887 and 1888, and it was built of stone
in the classic style, counterbalancing harmoniously the Gothic
lines of St. Georges Church at the northwest corner of Windsor and
Osborne. The ground floor contained a waiting room and other pass­
enger facilities, while the four upper floors were devoted to off­
ice space. The railway terminal proper consisted of a four-track
trainshed, ninety feet wide and 500 feet long, extending westward
from the station toward Mountain Street. This shed was concealed
from Osborne Street by a row of private homes which still occupied
the south side of the street west of the original station building
almost to Mountain Street. On the southeast corner of Mountain and
Osborne was the octagonal Olivet Baptist Church. The train shed re­
mained in place until the present tlBush type structure replaced it
in 1913.
Opening
It was hoped to have the station ready for use in the latter
part of 1888, but unforeseen deterring factors postponed its in­
auguration until the new year of 1889 had well begun. Finally, all
was in readiness and the offices were moved into the new structure
on February 1st. On the same day, a special train, consisting of a
locomotive and JIIIr. Thomas Shaughnessys official car tlChamplain , made
the first official trip from Windsor Street to Montreal Junc­
tion, now Montreal West. Those on board included Mr. Shaughnessy,
who was Assistant General Manager, and his chief, the indomitable
President, William C. Van Horne; also George Olds, General Passen­
ger Agent; T.A. McKinnon, Superintendent, Ontario and Atlantic
Divisions; P.A. Peterson, Chief ~ngineer; James Ross, Superinten­
dent of Construction; and other officials.
Ref,ular trains started to use the new station beginning on Monday,
February 4th, the first being the 9:00 M1 Day Express to
Boston via the Montreal and Boston Air Line, a through-routing com­
prised of the Canadian Pacific and several N9l England roads now
part of the Boston & r.1aine. There is some suggestion, however,
that the first passenger train to leave the station was the 8:45 PM
so-called I/estern Express tI for Toronto! Owen Sound and Chicago, on
the evening of Sunday, February 3rd, 18~9.
The trains leaving the station initially, were:
9:00 AM -Day Express to Boston via Montreal & Boston Air Line.
9:20 tI to Toronto.
3:40 PM -Fast Express to Lake Megantic, St. Hyacinthe, Sorel.
8:05 tI -Night to Boston.
8:45 -~festern to Toronto, Owen Sound, Chicago.
There were corresponding arrivals.
Services for Quebec, Ottawa St. Gabriel, St. Jerome St. Eus­
tache, and the Pacific Express leaving at 8:20 PM for Vancouver,
continued to depart from Dalhousie Square Station in the east end
of the city. John Elliott, who was Station Agent at Dalhousie
Square, was transferred to the new station in the same capacity,
and he was succeeded at the old station by J. Hamilton, hitherto
Agent at Hochelaga.
~P~a~g~e~3~2~ ______________________________________________ ~C~a~n~a~dian Rail
The newspapers pronounced the station a great boon to western
and southern travellerseven thoufh its inaufuration coincided with
the beginning of the annual Winter Carnival. The ne depots cast­
ellated lines vied in permanent stone with the equally-classic
outline of an ice palace erected opposite it in Dominion Square, as
the focal point of the carnival. On opening day, Canadian Pacific
had to swear in six special constables to control cab traffic in
front of the station, as yet unprovided with a formal cab rank.
The Gazette editorialized without mentioning the new station
by name:

Visitors by rail will remember that the gorgeous railway sta­
tions at which they disembark, are part of the city and not
part of the Carnival. The explanation may be necessary to
travellers accustomed to being dumped on the river bank below
Dalhousie Square or in the ramshackle structure that did such
noble duty under the name of Old Bonaventure..
The Operating and l-1echanical facilities for the new terminal
were constructed between Mountain and Aqueduct streets, on th-e
north side. Here, in an unbelievably small space, was concentrated
a roundhouse and turntable, with fuel and water facilities. Sever­
al sidings, south of the main line and opposite the roundhouse,
served for the storage of cars which could not be accomodated in
the trainshed.
Extensions A Ion g o s b 0 r n e S t r e e t
It was not long before the demands of an expanding company
necessitated plans to increase the office space radically. The tempo
of rail traffic was also on the increase, particularly after
1893, when the Lakeshore suburban service was established, with
one round trip daily between Montreal and Point Fortune, Que. For
this service, the C.P.R. constructed a special 4-6-4T suburban en­
gine, No. 624, which was a familiar sight for many years at the
Mountain Street roundhouse. In 1898, the N&O Subdivision was
completed, extending from a connection with the Point Fortune bran­
ch just west of Rip,aud, to Ottawa, resulting in the establishment
of new, fast services to the national capital via Rif,aud and Van­
kleek Hill. Accordinr,ly, the private homes along the south side of
Osborne Street, extending west to Bisson Street, were acquired and a new
extension, known as the Maxwell, constructed. This win~,
initially three storeys high, followed the architectural lines of
the original building quite closely. On the trainshed Side, there
was a space left between the north side of the old shed and the
south wall of the new wing, into which three new terminal tracks
were placed, increasing Windsor Stations capacity to seven tracks.
At about this time, Glen Yard was opened up to replace the Mountain
street engine terminal and passenger Sidings, and the roundhouse
was demolished, though the seventy-foot turntable was allowed to
remain for the time being.
RIGHT -(Top): An immigrant train at Windsor Station in 1911 j
structure of the main building and tower, then under construc­
tion, is barely visible in the background.
(Bottom): A train embarking passengers inside the 1889
trainshed, about 1905. Records fail to reveal what the occas-
ion was that prompted the throng of expectant spectators.
-Collection of O.S.A.Lavallee.

Canadian Rail Pa~5
Only six years later, in 1906, further extensions were under­
taken along Osborne Street, extending west of, and obliterating,
Bisson Street. This new wing,unlike the original building and the
1900 extension, was finished in stucco, earning it the practical if
uncomplimentary title of The Mud Hut. This expression is still
in the currency of conversation among older habitues of Windsor St­
ation. At about the same time, a fourth floor was added to the
Maxwell wing.
The A c c ide n t
This was the arrangement of the station when, on March 17th,
1909, it was the scene of its one and only serious railway accid­
ent. On that day, the morning train from Boston went out of con­
trol just east of Montreal West, when a spring or spring hanger on
the right-hand rear driver of 4-6-0 locomotive No. 902 failed,
causing the engine to list slightly resulting in the driving wheel
tire cutting the head from a staybolt. The resulting steam was
deflected directly into the cab at the enginemans poSition; in vain
did engineer Mark Cunningham try to stop the engine, scalding his
hands badly in the process. He either jumped or fell from the en­
gine, sustaining injuries from which he died almost instantly. The
fireman fared rather better, jumping after the engineer and suffer­
ing only slight bruises. A following train from Point Fortune re­
trieved the fireman and the body of the engineer.
The train continued on its way toward the station, the train
crew only suspecting somethinr. was amiss when it failed to stop at
Westmount. The .8 of one percent downgrade from Westmount to Wind­
sor Station served to accelerate the runaway, which was lined
for the southernmost track in the trainshed. It is estimated that
the train was doing 50 m.p.h. when it hit the stopblock, crossed
the platform area, and burst through the walls of the station into
the waiting room, killing a woman and three children. The engine
came to rest in the waiting room, sinking partially through the
floor into the basement. The passenger cars telescoped, the bagg­
age car breaking through the south wall of the train shed and over­
hanging Donegani Street. Miraculously, no one remaining on ooard
the train was more than slightly injured.
The death toll might have been greater but for the great pres­
ence of mind of a ticket collector, Thomas Whelan, who realized
what was wrong as the train came in sight, and at peril of his life
pushed passengers, who had congregated at the end of the track to
meet the train, out of the way. Mr. Whelan was the father of His
Grace Bishop Lawrence Whelan, present Catholic Auxiliary Bishop of
Montreal. The final touch of pathos was lent by the fact that the
husband and father of the woman and two of the children killed was on
board the train. On being told, at first, that there were no
casualties, he went to his home in Verdun only to learn that his
family had gone to meet him. lk was apprised of the terrible news upon
his return to the station.
Engine 902, formerly No. 853 (North British #6433 1903), was
repaired and, as No. 2102 after 1912, survived until i938 when it
was scrapped. It was a 70-drivered 4-6-0 of Class E-5-e.
LEFT: Beginning in June. i902. a thrice-weekly occasion at Windsor Sta­
tion was the departure of a new summer transcontinental service, the
Imperial Limited Express. Here. its varnish-and-gilt cars get under
way smartly at the behest of a beautifully-proportioned E-5 4-6-0, No.
813, freshly outshopped (August 1902) from De10rimier Works.

Canadian Rail Page 37
The GCr eat E 1 e c t r i f i cat ion P 1 a n
New and further expansion of the station facility got under
way in 1910, by acquisition of the remaining property in the block
bounded by St. Antoine, Windsor, Osborne and Mountain streets. At
this time, a firm of consulting engineers pr.epared a study on the
feasibility of electrifying haulage of trains into and out of the
station, as far as Westmount.
The object of this study was the elimination of the smoke and
noise nuisance caused by the steam locomotives ascending the grade
to VJestmount. It was found that an average of 52 passenger trains
and one freight train each day had to climb this grade. Average
trailing weight of the trains was 200 tons, while the maximum load
at that time was 600 tons. The report advocated three 40-ton Bo-Bo
electric locomotives, working at a pressure of 1200 volts D.C. and
they were designed to have sufficient capacity to handle 200-ton
trains with a considerable margin, but that two units operating in
mUltiple could handle the 600-ton train. Only three such locomot­
ives were contemplated, and they would be capable of 25 m.p.h. with
the maximum load. They were to be 700 h.p. units at the one hour
rating.
The total cost of this installation, including a steam-oper­
ated power generating station, locomotives, overhead trolley and
everything necessary was estimated to be 1P376,000. Unfortunately,
nothing came of this interesting proposal, which would have seen
catenary strung in Windsor Station and at Glen Yard, and on the
Green Avenue Switchback down to St. Henry yard.
E x pan s ion Sou t h war d
Ground was
broken in 1910 for the major extension to the stat­
ion to the south of the original building. This extension, cost­
ing ~1,512,000, was more than double the expenditure made on the
terminal up to that time. It embraced a prolongation of the orig­
inal structure, varying, because of the hill on Windsor Street,
between six and nine storeys in height, the fifteen-storey tower
which is now the most prominent architectural feature of vlindsor
Station, and the eight-storey extension along St. Antoine Street.
These works were two years in the building, and were completed in
1912. In 1913, the old 1889 trainshed was torn down and the new Bush
type shed erected, spanning eleven terminal tracks. A major
track relocation was carried out in connection with this work, the
new arrangement bearing little relationship to the original one.
The terminal tracks themselves were shortened by forty feet at the
station end, in order to allow construction of a ~lass-roofed con­
course between the ends of the tracks and the buildinp; proper.
These works cost $850,000. During this process, Donegani, and what
was left of Bisson Street disappeared completely. More space was
acquired on the railway approaches to the station, and the const­
riction occasioned by the fact that all of the lead tracks had been
east of Aqueduct Street was obliterated in the new arrangement.
The fan started just a little to the east of Seigneurs Street,
and a new interlockin~ tower built between Guy and Aqtieduct Str­
eets. The track positionin~ of this time has been essentially re­
tained to the present day, still controlled from Guy Street tower.
LEFT: The present trainshed as it appeared, when new, in 1914. Note the
platform skylights which have since been removed and the roof closed.
Train at left is a Lakeshore local, headed by 4-6-4T engine 5991.

Canadian Rail Page 39
ful drabness of the depression. The first came in the summer of
1933 when, as an expensive but effective publicity gesture, the
London, Midland & Scottish Railway of Great Britain, sent its
famous Royal Scot train to North America for a transcontinental
tour, ending up at the Century of Progress exposition in Chicago.
Locomotive No. 6100 (actually No. 6152) and its ei~ht-car train
were prepared for their journey at Angus Shops, principally by eq­
uipping the locomotive with a bell, headlight and pilot, and inser­
ting extra linkage in the screw couplings of the train in order to
negotiate the comparatively sharp curves in the Rockies. The train
made its public debut on display at Windsor Station, its maroon
decor contrasting effectively with the tuscan-red livery that has
become so much a part of Canadian Pacifics public image.
Then, three years later, on a fine June day in 1936, H-l-a
4-6-4 No. 2803 backed down into VHndsor Station suitably bedecked
in flags and bunting, commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the
departure of the first regularly-scheduled transcontinental pass­
enger train, which had occurred at the Dalhousie Square station on
June 28th, 1886. The conductor and engineer compared orders while
photographers recorded the occasion, then No. 2803, getting swiftly
into stride up the grade to Vlestmount, hauled No. 7 into the sunset
to mark a half-century of fulfillment of the promise made by the
original Canadian Pacific syndicate to the country, that they would
build a transcontinental railway.
1939: the towering image of Mars had once again appeared over
Europe; yet again the peaceful progress of the world had to be
interrupted –this time for six years –by the even more terrible
consequences of the Second viorld War. Once again the martial caden­
ce of military movements was heard on the concourse of Windsor Sta­
tion, which was eirded from the threat of war from the air by the
replacement of glasses in corridor doors and windows with masonite.
An air raid precaution organization evolved, and certain areas of
the vaulted underground of the massive terminal were deSignated as
shelters. Arrows pointinp: to the Red Shelter or the Blue Shel­
ter were commonplace around the station, as were the maps of the
theatres of war which the Public Relations Department displayed and
maintained, with coloured markers, to show the progress of military
operations. With the return of peace late in 1945, the maps dis­
appeared, the air raid shelter signs were removed, and civilian
clothes began once again to outnumber the military. Windsor Stat­
ion resumed its role in the direction of the great C~nadian Pacific
organization, whose services outside Canada on larld and sea had
been drastically curtailed by the war •
. ~ 0
Windsor Station Terminal Trackage, as revised in 1913.
Page 40
Ca.nadian Rai 1
Die s eli z a t ion
An event of unusual significance occurred on September 13th,
1949. At noon on that day, the train from Newport arrived with a
diesel-electric road switcher, No. $404, at the head end; this was
the first diesel-hauled passenger train ever to use the station.
More than eleven years then remained, hov/ever, before the station
would see its last operating steam locomotive. Even as the newly­
arrived maroon-and-yellow mechanical monster burbled within the
confines of the trainshed, hitherto sacrosanct to the invention of
Trevithick, plans were going on upstairs for the first new add­
itions to the station in four decades. These studies culminated in
the construction of yet a further wing along Osborne Street in
1951-52, bringing it finally to Mountain Street. Upon completion
of this building, a plaza was built to the west for the accomodat­
ion of express trucks; this was finished in 1953.
The years 1953 and 1954 marked the construction and opening of
another wing along St. Antoine Street –this one physically uncon­
nected, except for passageways, with the main bUilding. This str­
ucture, eight storeys in height and completely air-conditioned,
served to centralize the Accounting Department in one location and,
incidentally, provide space on its ground floor for a new mid­
TWentieth Century concept in business, the electronic computer. It
was in this building that the CPR installed an IBM 705 computer in
1955, later updating it (to use computerese) to a more advanced
IBM 70$0 assembly. The space vacated in the main building served
to accomodate many departments hitherto farmed out in other buil­
dings in Montreal.
The trains continued to run in and out of the station as they
had since 1$$9. In 1955 much publicity inaugurated the new ser­
vice between Montreal and Vancouver, with an early-afternoon pass­
enger departure from Windsor Station. The new, Budd-built, stain­
less steel and scenic-domed Canadian made its first run on April
24th, 1955, the go Signal having been given at a joint ceremony
in which the then-Chairman of the Company, William Mather, and the
Mayor of Montreal, Jean Drapeau, officiated.
The intensive suburban service maintained by CPR continued to
function with steam locomotives until early in 1960, when the die­
sels finally became numerous enough to take Qver for good. The
last steam-hauled passenger train to use the station was a special
chartered by our Association and using venerable A class engine
No. 29, on November 6th, 1960. Only two years older than the old­
est part of Windsor Station, No. 29 acquitted itself splendidly on
that occasion, in keeping with the finest CPR traditions.
Now, on February 1st, 1964, the Station observes its seven­
ty-fifth anniversary, and we are bound to ask, I~hat of the fut­
ure 7. While this is a question whose answer may well, for~
RIGHT -(Top): Illumination of public buildings for notable events was fash-
ionable forty-five years ago. Here. an incandescent Windsor Station
shines a welcome for the visit of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. in October.
1919. (OSAL Collection)
(Bottom): Windsor Station tempurarily assumed a continental air one day
early in the summer of 1933, when Britains famed Royal Scot loco­
motive and its eight-car train backed down against the stopblock prior
to departure on a transcontinental North American tour. Engine is eq­
uipped with a bell and headlight. freshly applied at Angus Shops. (CPR)
. ….­
. .,..­
./
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, ……..
. ~ ———–/
~~~——~ …….. ~. -.,~ …. –~~————~—-~–~~~.——–~~
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Page 48 Canadian Rail
Ic.::…..;a::..;;;:n….;a-d….;i….;a::..;;;:n __ P–a;….:.c_:i..::fc..;i-C-=–_M_o-t_i,_v~e __ P_o w e r Situation
I
During the year just past. Canadian Pacific Railway scrapped thirty-eight
steam locomotives. and disposed of thirteen others for preservation. The total
. of 51 locomotives thereby retired during 1963 represented a decrease from the
previous year. when 57 units were disposed of. The 1963 retirements were:
To the Canadian Rail Transportation Museum. for preservation:
jA-l 4-4-0 No. 29; D-4 4-6-0 No. 492; D-I0 4-6-0 No. 999; G-l 4-6-2 No. 2231;
G-3 4-6-2 No. 2341j H-14-6-4 No. 2850; F-l 4-4-4 No. 2928; M-3 2-8-0 No.
,3388; P-2 2-8..,.2 No. 5468j T-l 2-10-4 No. 5935j U-3 0-6-0 No. 6271. (March)
I
To Ontario Northland Railway. for preservation:
P-2 2-8-2 No. 5361j H-I 4-6-4 No. 2839.
I
Scrapped:
D-I0 4-6-0: No. 926
G-2 4-6-2: Nos. 1207. 1209. 1213. 1279. 1296.
G-3 Nos. 2352. 2358. 2360. 2363. 2372. 2384. 2389. 2432. 2445.
H-l 4-6-4: Nos. 2829. 2831.
N-2 2-8-0: Nos. 3663.3676.3677.
P-l 2-8-2: Nos. 5128. 5174. 5205. 5210. 5211.5230.5241.5263.
P-2 Nos. 5372.5387.5431.5432.5435.5436.5439.5442.5444.5450.
In addition. eight electric locomotives from the Grand River/Lake Erie & Nor­
thern operation were disposed of. as follows:
Grand River Ry. No. 222 sold Iowa Terminal Ry •• July 1963.

224

October 1963

226

January 1963.

228

July 1963.
230 sold Cornwall St. Ry •• Light & Power Co •• Decr 1962.
232 scrapped at West Toronto. September 1963.
234 Preston. Ont •• February 1963.
Lake Erie & Northern Ry. No. 337 sold Iowa Terminal Ry .• January 1963.
At. the end of 1963. therefore. eighty steam units remained to be disposed of
composed of 9 4-6-0sj 364-6-2s; 5 4-6-4s; 24-8-4s; 5 2-8-05; 15 2-8-2sj
2 2-10-0s; 60-8-0s. Quite a nUmber of these are being held pending possible
historical preservation. In fact. since the end of the year. N-2 2-8-0 No. 3651
has reportedly been earmarked for preservation at Lethbridge. Alta.
Those readers who wish to know the ;ndividual identities of the eighty loco­
motives remaining at the beginning of 1964. are referred to the July-August iss­
ue of Canadian Rail. for 1963. in which a list of locomotives remaining as of the
beginning of June last year. was pUblished. It is suggested that the list be re­
vised in the light of the foregoing.
As a result of the sale of wheat to the U.S.S.R •• and the consequent move­
ment of this staple by rail. a shortage of motive power has developed necessitat­
ing the rental of diesel-electric units from United States roads. At the middle
of January, Canadian Pacific had officially leased twenty-three units:

.
f
~-
7
-=–=-~
·
·~·
—~_-…
_____
_
__
a
__
A.
The
subject
of
our
diagram
corner
this
month
is
a
Canadian
Pacific
Ra:i.hiay
extra
gang
boarding
car
of
the
vintage
of
1902.
This
sixty-foot
car
was
one
of
four
constructed
by
the
Company
in
that
year,
numbered
4824,
4825,
4826
and
4827.
These
units
weighed
65,600
pounds.
The
exterior
was
painted
freight
brown
and
sheathed
in
pine;
the
interior
was
also
pine-sheathed
and
paint­
ed
in
grey
and
drab.
The
car
was
illuminated
by
oil
lamps
and
heat
was
provided
by
a
Gurney
New
Globe
heater.
The
se
cars,
along
with
a
corresponding
type
of
bunk
car,
were
intended
for
the
accolllOdation
of
crews
composed
of
Orientals,
who
were
employed
in
heavy
main­
tenance
work
on
western
lines.
At
the
period
in
ques­
tion,
there
were no wooden
passenger
cars
available
for
conversion
as
there
have
been
latterly,
hence
the
need
for
these
passenger
car-length
service
cars.
All
were
scrapped
~
years
ago.
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U
BOARDING
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Foreigner DeuB Wright –Mont~eal Star
Its not a through train to Hollywood, Marilyn … its just one of the engines theyve rented to belp move
Russian grain!
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
e.,.61ishu 1932 • :Box 22 . Sldlien 13 . jUollllusl 2 . Que • 8lfCOfpo,.tcJ 1941
CANADIAN RAIL: Published eleven times annually by the Publications Committe,
Canadian Railroad Historical Association. Subscription included
with Associate Membership: $4.00 annually.
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS CO~IMITTEE: David R. Henderson
EDITOR, CANADIAN RAIL:
ASSISTANT EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
COMMITTEE:
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SUBSCRIBERS I
BEFORE YOU MOVE-WRITE!
ADVERTISING MANAGER: S. S. Worthen
At ICHat 5 week, before you
mOH~. Icnd us a leHer, 1 card,
or a posl-o(£lcc change-of.
address (ofm tellips u. both your
OLD and yotlr NEW
addrellu.
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
OTTAVIA VALLEY:
PACI fI C COAST:
SOUTHERN ONTARIO:
ALGOMA:
SASKATCHEWAN:
ROCKY MOUNTAIN:
Kenneth r. Chivers, Apartment 3, 67 Somerset Street West, Ottawa,
Peter Cox, 2936 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
~illiam D. McKeown, Apartment 201, 859 Kennedy Road, Scarborough,
wi lliam F. Cooksley, 594 11cDonald Avenue, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
J. S. Nicolson, 2329 Dufferin Avenue, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
V.H· Coley, 11243-72 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta
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